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42' fishing boat lost and crew killed crossing Yaquina Bar in Oregon

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42' fishing boat lost and crew killed crossing Yaquina Bar in Oregon

Old 01-10-2019, 12:51 AM
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Default 42' fishing boat lost and crew killed crossing Yaquina Bar in Oregon

https://www.oregonlive.com/news/2019...xperience.html


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...hree-crew.html
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Old 01-10-2019, 05:52 AM
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Sad story. Seemed inevitable.
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Old 01-10-2019, 06:13 AM
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In this situation, would it have been better to weather the storm at sea? Although since the USCG agreed to escort them in, maybe this is a common occurrence with the bar?
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Old 01-10-2019, 12:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Chimpo View Post
In this situation, would it have been better to weather the storm at sea? Although since the USCG agreed to escort them in, maybe this is a common occurrence with the bar?
The latest reports state they took the wrong approach coming in....they were coming in too far North..in an area that is know for issues.
And the boat took a 20' breaker over the bow and capsized.
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Old 01-10-2019, 01:23 PM
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If your from the gulf this terrain will almost be unimaginable .

Scenario in Oregon is usually, old neglected boat, strike or some other reason the season is delayed. Season starts off late, big storm, big bills two month's late... lots of pressure.

Old boat, underpowered, that bar has moved around a lot this year with the rain / wind combo. Doesn't take much, 20 ft breakers and one bottom contact and your done. Loose a few each year, sad reality of the game.
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Old 01-10-2019, 04:33 PM
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20ft breakers.... God bless the Coastguard for going out in that shit.

This goes to reinforce the saying that the most dangerous thing on a boat is a tight schedule.
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Old 01-10-2019, 08:08 PM
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I read this online yesterday, what a shame. Isn't there something that can be done to make the areas that the sand bars form more safe? You would think they could make a channel with rocks or a break wall of some kind so the boats could run through a channel.....but what do I know?

RIP sailors...…..
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Old 01-10-2019, 09:27 PM
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I know this is a stupid question but Im going to ask it anyway. What kills these guys and do they always die after a boat goes down? Im really being serous not trying to be an ass. Do they die from hypothermia or is the wave action too much or a combination? Is it contact with the boat? Or, are there a lot of guys that survive this, we just dont hear about it across the country? I know this is a different world, in the winter, in the pacific, 20 ft seas, at night, etc. Im really just wondering if its the cold that is so deadly or the wave action.
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Old 01-10-2019, 09:28 PM
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Originally Posted by RussH View Post
I read this online yesterday, what a shame. Isn't there something that can be done to make the areas that the sand bars form more safe? You would think they could make a channel with rocks or a break wall of some kind so the boats could run through a channel.....but what do I know?

RIP sailors...…..
Im pretty sure they have some significant jetties there, like a mile long.
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Old 01-10-2019, 11:56 PM
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Originally Posted by RussH View Post
I read this online yesterday, what a shame. Isn't there something that can be done to make the areas that the sand bars form more safe? You would think they could make a channel with rocks or a break wall of some kind so the boats could run through a channel.....but what do I know?

RIP sailors...…..

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Old 01-11-2019, 04:45 AM
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^^^
Sounds like what I've heard about Jupiter Inlet. If Jupiter inlet was in the dungeons of Hell. Nice place to go boating...
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Old 01-11-2019, 04:59 AM
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42’ boat and 20’ waves. Isn’t that pretty standard for THT?

In all seriousness, no f’ng way. I was in 20’ waves on a 650’ naval vessel and I thought the ship would break in half.
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Old 01-11-2019, 11:08 AM
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Old 01-11-2019, 01:56 PM
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I sell bait to these guys---it's one of the most dangerous occupations there is.

Just got off a phone with one of my colleagues who works with boats in Monterrey. Over the last few weeks the wind has been howling and it's been only the 80 footers that have gone north to fish in that crap and set their pots.

Everyone was surprised that a 40 footer would have gone out in those conditions, though it sounds like weather started off o.k. then got bad in a hurry.

On top of that, it sounds like there was a skipper who might not have known the proper approach to Yaquina bar. Either that or he didn't have enough power to make the corrrection once he figured out where he was

A poster above asked what kills these guys. My guess is that boat went over so fast nobody was prepared. A lot of these guys wear some type of cotton (hoodies etc). That's a good start to hypothermia---killed lots of guys in the Bering Sea where you've only got a few minutes of immersion before hypothermia kicks in---the waters off the Oregon coast this time of the year and not much friendlier then the Bering Sea as far as temperature

Those guys down in Yaquina: you can imagine getting dumped off a boat in 20 footers---if you're in the water On that bar you have rock jetties on both sides and then there's your own boat and whatever came off the deck in the water with you ---you're getting tossed around in the washing machine with all stuff that going on--- Blunt trauma or hypothermia---take your pick

Last edited by marketic; 01-11-2019 at 03:31 PM.
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Old 01-11-2019, 02:39 PM
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Our “inlets” in the Pacific NW can be plain shitty. Like the east, tide direction Oman’s rate is important. Not uncommon to have the “bars” closed to 30’ and under or flat out closed to all vessels. And big swell, wind from a different direction, big outgoing tide, and then add runoff from a heavy recent rain or snowmelt, and shit gets real, really fast. Sandbars move and dredging can’t be done year to year (way to much cost and environmental crap for that frequency). Then, add the human dimensions from bravado, complacency, to outright lack of experience, and we end up losing boats and folks every year.

Water temps are below 50°, so a person isn’t going to survive for long. If we go in, biggest hope is that we are wearing a PFD so the USCG can find our bodies for our families.
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Old 01-11-2019, 02:47 PM
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When a boat rolls in breakers if you're not out instantly you're gone. Even if you are out there's undercurrents, the temperature, and the sheer violence of the wave action.

My guess is tank slacked a bit, caught a wave funky and not enough power to keep from broaching. Boat rolled quick, either crushed or drowned in minutes. Most of the small Oregon coast crab boats are in pretty tough shape. It's a little shocking what they go to sea in.

What's the survival time in 38-degree water, drowning probably about the same amount of time as freezing to death. I've been in once in that kind of water, hard to describe the shock to your system.
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