Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > Dockside Chat
Reload this Page >

Guitar Question (updated at post 68)

Notices
Like Tree40Likes

Guitar Question (updated at post 68)

Old 01-09-2019, 12:05 PM
  #1  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Pineville, LA
Posts: 5,082
Default Guitar Question (updated at post 68)

From reading the posts on here, I can tell some of y'all are accomplished guitar players. I have been playing low brass instruments (mainly trombone and baritone) since I was in sixth grade, so about 29 years. I played in the LSU Marching Band for four years and I have dabbled since then. I say this so you know I am music literate to a degree and I have an idea of how much work it takes to get truly proficient in something.

I would like to learn to play the guitar as something I can mess around with and practice to relieve some stress and boredom. I tried (both acoustic and bass) years ago and gave it up. I got frustrated with how little process I made. Also, in my town there are very few folks who teach adults guitar lessons. My Mom has played for 60 years or so, so she said she will teach me the basics.

I have been doing a little reading today. I found this guy's blog and I like some of his points. Mainly, to find things you like to play and progress in stages.
Learn to Play the Guitar in 10 Hours ? No Musical Talent Required

So, guitar gurus, give some tips. I will be borrowing my Mom's nylon stringed guitar to start. I want to move to a steel string one later on, but I want to gauge my interest before I start buying nice stuff. The goal eventually (gonna be a while) is to learn some electric also and maybe attempt bass again. I am not trying to play gigs or anything. Just enough to mess around with and practice my singing with at the start.

Last edited by cwhite6; 03-18-2019 at 12:40 PM.
cwhite6 is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 12:19 PM
  #2  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Amongst the FL fishies
Posts: 6,799
Default

I quit lessons and then learned to play on my own - played tons in high school , both folk and rock. In college I quit for cars, booze and women. Now some 50 years later, I have a real desire to start again.

If you want the music, take it in steps. Master each one, then move to the next. The more you practice, the better t will become. Get a good instructor. I got my first guitar at about 7 and my instructor was a jerk, so I lost interest. He was an old man and I was a kid - nothing worked.
cwhite6 likes this.
airbrush is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 12:26 PM
  #3  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Posts: 2,373
Default

Instruction is only useful if you can stay interested. This guy is great for beginners:

https://www.justinguitar.com

As for guitars, nylon is good, or an electric with low action until your fingertips toughen up.

High-action acoustics have slayed millions of beginners.

Best of luck...
sealion2288, cwhite6 and avenger79 like this.
Chuckster is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 12:38 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: WI
Posts: 103
Default

chuckster beat me to it with Justinguitar

also look up Martymusic on youtube. guy is amazing and teaches very well.
mwgoldman and cwhite6 like this.
avenger79 is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 12:38 PM
  #5  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Mt. Pleasant, SC
Posts: 130
Default

If your goal is to play bass or electric, then start with a bass or electric. You may not want to spend money initially, but at some point you are going to need to and you might as well get off to a good start. Sounds like you've got tons of expierence that should help.

Rocksmith is really fun for someone that is new: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocksmith . Super-easy to start making music with it and you can play bass.
cwhite6 and Sheepsheadhunter like this.
JP 3 is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 12:48 PM
  #6  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Pineville, LA
Posts: 5,082
Default

Originally Posted by JP 3 View Post
If your goal is to play bass or electric, then start with a bass or electric. You may not want to spend money initially, but at some point you are going to need to and you might as well get off to a good start. Sounds like you've got tons of expierence that should help.

Rocksmith is really fun for someone that is new: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocksmith . Super-easy to start making music with it and you can play bass.
I am going to look for the Rock Smith game at my local game reseller. I am starting with acoustic for a couple of reasons. One, I have access to a couple of them for free to try out. Two, I have been singing for years and I want to learn some of the older country songs to sing along to. Most of them are on acoustic (Johnny Cash, Garth, Willie Nelson, etc.).
cwhite6 is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 12:50 PM
  #7  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsyltucky
Posts: 7,139
Default

Learn you're fretboard. Not just all the notes along any given string, but where all the adjacent notes are. Not fun, but pays off by allowing you to figure out chords and licks more easily.

Either buy a tuner or a tuning fork. You're going to want to be able to learn by ear, and once you know your fretboard, scales, and basic chords, you can start to do that if you're guitar is in proper tuning. Dont worry about open or drop tunings for now. Just standard tuning.

Make sure you're guitar is properly setup intonation and action wise.

Learn all your major, minor, 7th and 9th chords. Learn to play them in various locations and forms. There are many, many chord variations, but the ones I mentioned will give you a start.

Learn your scales and how to apply them up and down the fretboard. I would suggest major and minor pentatonic to start. You will eventually want to learn other scales and modes.

Alot of the stuff is "movable", so once you learn it in one key, you can apply it to another.

Since you're starting off with a nylon string guitar now would be a good time to start fingerpicking. As opposed to using a pick. If you're using a pick, master alternate picking and dabble in hybrid picking. But don't lose sight of finger picking. Especially if you're playing accoustic.
Brad1 is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 01:02 PM
  #8  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsyltucky
Posts: 7,139
Default

Forgot to mention, there are numerous techniques which can really make you're playing sound more interesting. Like bending, vibrato, muting, raking (which is like palm muting), sliding. Eventually you'll want to learn all of those techniques, but the only one I would recommend for a beginner is sliding. Meaning, on the same string, slide up or down a half step or a whole step.
Brad1 is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 01:12 PM
  #9  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
THT sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Houston/Sargent, Texas
Posts: 5,330
Default

Listen to Brad1, he is a very accomplished guitar player.

But...Justin guitar and Marty Schwartz are both really good places to start. That is where I started and I was playing a song that I could sing along to in a month or too.

I would also advise buying a used Yamaha steel stringed guitar...you can always sell it for about what you paid for it.
Chuckster likes this.
freedbaby is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 01:20 PM
  #10  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Pineville, LA
Posts: 5,082
Default

Originally Posted by freedbaby View Post
Listen to Brad1, he is a very accomplished guitar player.

But...Justin guitar and Marty Schwartz are both really good places to start. That is where I started and I was playing a song that I could sing along to in a month or too.

I would also advise buying a used Yamaha steel stringed guitar...you can always sell it for about what you paid for it.
My Mom favors the Yamaha steel string also, so i was planning on getting an acoustic/electric one if I stick with it. They are not very expensive used either, which is nice.

I joined the Justin site and will be starting there.
Chuckster likes this.
cwhite6 is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 01:21 PM
  #11  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Pineville, LA
Posts: 5,082
Default

Originally Posted by Brad1 View Post
Learn you're fretboard. Not just all the notes along any given string, but where all the adjacent notes are. Not fun, but pays off by allowing you to figure out chords and licks more easily.

Either buy a tuner or a tuning fork. You're going to want to be able to learn by ear, and once you know your fretboard, scales, and basic chords, you can start to do that if you're guitar is in proper tuning. Dont worry about open or drop tunings for now. Just standard tuning.

Make sure you're guitar is properly setup intonation and action wise.

Learn all your major, minor, 7th and 9th chords. Learn to play them in various locations and forms. There are many, many chord variations, but the ones I mentioned will give you a start.

Learn your scales and how to apply them up and down the fretboard. I would suggest major and minor pentatonic to start. You will eventually want to learn other scales and modes.

Alot of the stuff is "movable", so once you learn it in one key, you can apply it to another.

Since you're starting off with a nylon string guitar now would be a good time to start fingerpicking. As opposed to using a pick. If you're using a pick, master alternate picking and dabble in hybrid picking. But don't lose sight of finger picking. Especially if you're playing accoustic.
Thanks!!! That is a lot of stuff to learn, but I have plenty of time.
cwhite6 is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 01:22 PM
  #12  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 5,601
Default

Brad knows what he's talking about, but if you don't see progress you get defeated and give up. There are a ton of 2 and 3 chord songs out there that you can master in a short amount of time. Look up Margaretville by Jimmy Buffett, it's a pretty basic 3 chord song, D, A, G. The intro is even pretty easy to get down and Marty will show you on youtube. If you practice a simple song or 2 along with learning your notes etc it will give you something to feel good about when you get frustrated learning notes.
rainmaker, Chuckster and cwhite6 like this.
YFMF is online now  
Old 01-09-2019, 02:46 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
gatorbus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Palm Harbor, Fl
Posts: 1,044
Default

Youtube is your friend. If that was in existence 30 years ago, man. We used to learn songs by ear using records, picking up the needle and going over each passage until we learned it. Now days there are at least 20 different guys giving lessons on any particular song. Kids these days have it so easy.

Start off by learning G, C, and D. There are a million songs that have that progression.

PS, you can only get out what you put into it.
Chuckster, SweetD and cwhite6 like this.
gatorbus is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 04:16 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: RI
Posts: 1,513
Default

Originally Posted by gatorbus View Post
Youtube is your friend. If that was in existence 30 years ago, man. We used to learn songs by ear using records, picking up the needle and going over each passage until we learned it. Now days there are at least 20 different guys giving lessons on any particular song. Kids these days have it so easy.

Start off by learning G, C, and D. There are a million songs that have that progression.

PS, you can only get out what you put into it.
^This

I've been playing for about 30 years, since late high school. Mostly acoustic rhythm/lead vocals, as I play with two other guys (acoustic lead and electric bass) - we play out from time to time at local joints, for (a little) money, and a lot of fun.

YouTube is definitely your friend these days. Pick songs that you want to learn - almost every tune can be played, at least basically, with 3-5 chords. Also, get your chord progression down for any given song before you start trying to sing along with your playing. Make sure whatever guitar you use is set up well, meaning the strings are comfortably and correctly spaced from the fretboard. This will keep your fingers and hands comfortable and not as fatigued, leading to less frustration and longer periods of play.

Have fun!
SweetD is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 04:18 PM
  #15  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 272
Default

I learned at 23. Here’s my advice...buy an acoustic guitar with a solid top. Spend $50-$100 to get it set up with low action and put 12s on it. I bought a ‘64 epiphone Texan and with the setup I was all in for $475. If you’re on this site, you can swing that. Learning on an electric is tough because muting strings ringing out when they’re not supposed to is a bit difficult—in other words, when you suck, you’ll sound better on an acoustic. Learning on an acoustic with high action will make you quit. Justin Sandercoe on YouTube and Marty Schwartz are your friends. Learn songs that are easy, to keep you interested. Learn an open E chord without using your index finger. Then learn e shaped bar chords. Then learn an open D, then learn an open G. Tackling an open C and F will be more difficult but since you know barre chords you can get by until your fingers stretch. Best of luck.
prestigemid is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 04:59 PM
  #16  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Destin, FL.
Posts: 727
Default

long time player and you have some great suggestions above. whatever you buy you should buy a tuner and a stand. I found that if the guitar was in the case and stuffed under a bed or in a closet I wouldn't play it often. when its on the stand and ready to go I will stop and play every chance I get. maybe just a spare 5 minutes or a quick song but having it out and ready helps and I know I play it more when its on the stand. Marty Schwartz is a great youtube teacher.
SweetD likes this.
HuntersDad is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 05:09 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: RI
Posts: 1,513
Default

Originally Posted by HuntersDad View Post
whatever you buy you should buy a tuner and a stand. I found that if the guitar was in the case and stuffed under a bed or in a closet I wouldn't play it often. when its on the stand and ready to go I will stop and play every chance I get. maybe just a spare 5 minutes or a quick song but having it out and ready helps and I know I play it more when its on the stand.
This is so true. I'm a "fifteen minutes a day guy" if I'm lucky when it comes to practicing at this point...but I would be a "zero minutes per day" guy much more often if the guitar and stand were not out and at the ready.
SweetD is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 05:37 PM
  #18  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Pineville, LA
Posts: 5,082
Default

Y’all are awesome!! Thanks!! My Mom brought her guitar over tonight. I need to get it restrung. It is an Epiphone C-10/NA and it has half metal strings and half nylon which Mom says she prefers. I am bringing it to the local music shop tomorrow to get it restrung. Any of you ever play one with half nylon and half metal strings?

Last edited by cwhite6; 01-09-2019 at 05:46 PM.
cwhite6 is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 05:39 PM
  #19  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 2,832
Default

Originally Posted by HuntersDad View Post
long time player and you have some great suggestions above. whatever you buy you should buy a tuner and a stand. I found that if the guitar was in the case and stuffed under a bed or in a closet I wouldn't play it often. when its on the stand and ready to go I will stop and play every chance I get. maybe just a spare 5 minutes or a quick song but having it out and ready helps and I know I play it more when its on the stand. Marty Schwartz is a great youtube teacher.
Originally Posted by SweetD View Post
This is so true. I'm a "fifteen minutes a day guy" if I'm lucky when it comes to practicing at this point...but I would be a "zero minutes per day" guy much more often if the guitar and stand were not out and at the ready.
I have to third this. It's a simple thing, but IMO makes a big difference.

Also, as you probably already know, break down and master portions of a song versus attempting a whole song at once. IMO that is a quicker way to learn muscle memory. And try to stay away from tablature - you should already be able to read music.
chrisjb is offline  
Old 01-09-2019, 05:44 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 537
Default

I found when learning to play that progress comes in steps. It's not linear. You will find that you seem to play at the same level for weeks possibly even months at a time, and then you'll see a sudden change in your playing like you got better over night.

If you can find an accomplished player (friend) to jam with..rather than lessons, that's where you will learn the most. If you eventually get an amp, buy yourself a looper pedal to lay down some rhythm allowing you to explore soloing in key.

Last edited by JonisMist; 01-09-2019 at 06:05 PM.
JonisMist is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread