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2X6 or 2X4 Exterior Studs for New House?

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2X6 or 2X4 Exterior Studs for New House?

Old 01-03-2019, 05:44 AM
  #121  
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Most new homes are using metal studs around here. The same sub often does the framing AND the sheetrock. Of course trusses are still untreated SYP. I have found termite damage in just about house we've done any serious remodeling in.

The other issue..termite barrier. A couple years ago the gubment mandated a switch from chlordane to something like dursban. Dursban is what your wife sprinkles on rose bushes. Worthless for termites after a year or 2. This is why older houses often have fewer termite problem than new houses.
They used Bifen on my garage. I thought that is what they used to treat all slabs. I think they do a stronger mix than what we use for mosquito treatment.
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Old 01-03-2019, 05:55 AM
  #122  
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Originally Posted by RyanL11 View Post
lol...Mr.100 homes is butthurt because he's a budget home builder and tried to build 1 nice home and he was out of his league. Stick to four 4 walls and some siding. Lol
I believe that's exactly the issue. I've gotta buddy who designs/builds his own simple rental homes/duplexes. Does a great job. He's found his niche.

What do architects also provide? Aesthetics. Functional attritributes. Just plain good design. Bad art? Hide in the closet! Bad architecture? We've gotta look at it until Kudzu covers it......
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Old 01-03-2019, 05:57 AM
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Originally Posted by TheRealMacGyver View Post


They used Bifen on my garage. I thought that is what they used to treat all slabs. I think they do a stronger mix than what we use for mosquito treatment.
I do believe it is getting better, but none is as good as the old stuff. And, termites are getting worse.
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:02 AM
  #124  
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Neither. Why? Termites. I haven't seen a quality frame house built around here in years. CBS, steel studs for partition walls.
I'm getting ready to build a house like this! I wouldn't consider a house in Florida without block walls.
I'm also going to use 1-1/2" steel furring on the block walls which allows thicker insulation and no need to cut holes in the block for electrical boxes.

The only wood in my house will be the trusses and roof sheeting!
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:15 AM
  #125  
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Originally Posted by Jus Teasin View Post
I'm getting ready to build a house like this! I wouldn't consider a house in Florida without block walls.
I'm also going to use 1-1/2" steel furring on the block walls which allows thicker insulation and no need to cut holes in the block for electrical boxes.

The only wood in my house will be the trusses and roof sheeting!
Good idea. Insulating or shading the exterior walls can also reduce heat gain of the masonry, which holds a large QUANTITY of heat energy, which slowly dissapates thru the walls. What's it called in cold areas? A trompe wall? Absorbs and holds heat energy which is dissapated at night. Like an icecube in reverse!
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:17 AM
  #126  
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
In a way, building in Florida is getting easier. As a contractor, I don't have to know ANYTHING about building codes or materials. EVERYTHING is specified by the architect/engineer. Hell, on some jobs, even the height and location of the toilet paper holder is specified.

I deal with all my subs on a verbal basis. I don't shop subs either. We do a lot of stuff T&M. I don't do anything that requires a permit either. Technically some stuff SHOULD be permitted, like a water heater change-out. My take, ANY licensed plumber can change out a water heater..it ain't rocket surgery and it SURE ain't worth $200 in permits.
To which I disagree.

I believe homes/houses should be plug and play like replacing a stove or refrigerator. The 2nd and 3rd installation process is usually crappy, performed as quick as possible, and subs do not look at anything beyond the scope of their discipline.
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:18 AM
  #127  
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Originally Posted by RyanL11 View Post
lol...Mr.100 homes is butthurt because he's a budget home builder and tried to build 1 nice home and he was out of his league. Stick to four 4 walls and some siding. Lol
Ugh, honestly you're just too dense to get it, I mean you couldn't even figure out that there was a rhetorical question in my earlier response (google rhetorical). I've never built a house under $400k in my life and wouldn't know the first thing about making money on a starter home. I"m done with you, you're arrogant, annoying and just plain wrong. All the best buddy.
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:25 AM
  #128  
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Originally Posted by boatruptcy View Post
Ugh, honestly you're just too dense to get it, I mean you couldn't even figure out that there was a rhetorical question in my earlier response (google rhetorical). I've never built a house under $400k in my life and wouldn't know the first thing about making money on a starter home. I"m done with you, you're arrogant, annoying and just plain wrong. All the best buddy.
One quick question, you're a builder, worked with an architect, and you weren't smart enough to know a design feature wasn't going to be able to be built? Like I said...you're naive, and likely a budget builder and you were out of your league. Like Bill said, everyone has their niche.
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:31 AM
  #129  
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Originally Posted by dsharp View Post
If you are going with 10 and 12’ walls I would go with a 2x6. Trying to find straight 2x4’s in stud length is bad enough, I can’t imagine how many you would cull through for 10 and 12 footers. You will have a much stronger structure with the 2x6 exterior walls. Also depends on how long you plan to stay in the home. I would think the additional costs for door jambs and window sills would be negligible.
this guy got it right, hard enough to find straight 2X6, you will notice when they sheetrock over non plumb walls. Go 2x6 and make sure carpenters straighten walls prior to sheetrock.
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Old 01-03-2019, 06:53 AM
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Originally Posted by DavenFla View Post
To which I disagree.

I believe homes/houses should be plug and play like replacing a stove or refrigerator. The 2nd and 3rd installation process is usually crappy, performed as quick as possible, and subs do not look at anything beyond the scope of their discipline.
To some degree, we agree. A licensed plumber won't use sharkbites, and will probably install a new ball valve. Hacks won't. But the building department now wants an expansion tank and a NEW manual electrical disconnect with a 25 amp breaker..25 amp, not 30. Historically, HWH here have been installed using a 30 amp dryer cord and plug. No problems.

I've found new electric ranges to be extremely plug location specific. Units won't flush to the wall unless the plug and cord are in the exactly correct position. We request the client tell us what stove they are using, so we can position the range outlet correctly.

Much of remodelling is done by unlicensed hacks with a smattering of knowledge, not licensed and professional "subs". We just demoed a kitchen, handyman had hooked up a new microwave. Pulled the power off one side of the range cord. Sparky said he's seen that frequently. Homeowners seem to think ANY tradesman or even a handyman hack is competent in everything. Thank God for breaker panels.
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Old 01-03-2019, 08:16 AM
  #131  
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Most new homes are using metal studs around here. The same sub often does the framing AND the sheetrock. Of course trusses are still untreated SYP. I have found termite damage in just about house we've done any serious remodeling in.

The other issue..termite barrier. A couple years ago the gubment mandated a switch from chlordane to something like dursban. Dursban is what your wife sprinkles on rose bushes. Worthless for termites after a year or 2. This is why older houses often have fewer termite problem than new houses.

Couple of years ago?
1983 – 30 years ago
Chlordane products were allowed for restricted underground termite control for an additional five years until suspended in 1988
Used to use it around the house. You were supposed to have a license to purchase it
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Old 01-03-2019, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by TheRealMacGyver View Post
My current house is wood frame and my last house was wood frame. So the past 26 years I have lived in wood frame house in Florida. Never had termites. There are a few things to make sure you dont, but saying build concrete not wood because of termites is just plain ignorant. Block homes have plenty of wood and get termites too.

Tell my 4 (of 6 neighbors on my street) their ignorant as there houses were tented for termites in the past year! Last one they just pulled the tent off yesterday after 48 hours. Tampa area. It's a REAL problem.....
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Old 01-03-2019, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
Couple of years ago?
1983 – 30 years ago
Chlordane products were allowed for restricted underground termite control for an additional five years until suspended in 1988
Used to use it around the house. You were supposed to have a license to purchase it
Of course it was just a couple years, whippersnapper!
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Old 01-03-2019, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Lucky69 View Post
Tell my 4 (of 6 neighbors on my street) their ignorant as there houses were tented for termites in the past year! Last one they just pulled the tent off yesterday after 48 hours. Tampa area. It's a REAL problem.....
Tenting is best used for drywood termites. I've worked on houses which were tented only days before, and subterraneans were munching away undeterred.
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Old 01-03-2019, 08:54 AM
  #135  
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Might have been corrected in other posts but closed cell insulation in a 2x6 wall is 19.5. much much better than anything you can bet in a 2x4 wall.. And with the closed cell 2x6, 24" on center works.is acceptable, under code in many states
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Old 01-03-2019, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Of course it was just a couple years, whippersnapper!
How time fly's when your having fun

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Old 01-03-2019, 10:43 AM
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I built mine with 10' high, 12" thick ICF exterior walls, timberframe/SIP roof. Hardie panel siding, metal roof. Super insulated Cellular PVC windows. Passive solar heating assist. I expect it will be standing 300 years from now. However, I don't expect to live that long as I nearly killed myself building it LOL. I had no architect, no engineer, and no builder. It was all done by me. Would I do it again? Probably not. Do I regret it? No. That said, my house is too tight. If you turn on the clothes dryer, or kitchen exhaust, you can't open the front door without it slamming shut. Tough to keep humidity at bay when the AC isn't running.

The questions to ask should be... Is this your forever home.. built to usher you into the grave with full, one level living, all wheel chair accessible etc. or are you going to be living in it for a few years and then selling. If a house is being built to be sold, most folks would build to minimum code and then put some eye candy on the skeleton while paying higher utility bills for the few years they live in it. If its a forever home, build it strong, insulate it well, ventilate it well, and enjoy the savings on utility and home repairs long into retirement.

Not everyone wants a quality home. When it comes to insulating, heating, and cooling, the devil is in the installation details, not whether you used 2x4 or 2x6 or open cell vs closed vs batt. All are well proven. It's how its installed, not what's installed. Just my 2 cents and for the record, I've only built one house and am neither a framer, builder, architect or engineer. I haven't met one of those yet that I liked and I don't want to hate myself.
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Old 01-03-2019, 01:36 PM
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Originally Posted by cphilip View Post
I've heard staggered 2x4's was a superior method to 2x6?
staggered double exterior wall framings has 2 benefits. #1 it gives you opportunity for more insulation (higher R Value). #2 and more importantly it creates a thermal break in the structure. Wall thickess and insulation r value is only 1 piece of building an energy efficient home. There are alot of pieces to that puzzle and they all need to be in place and done properly to work properly.
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Old 01-03-2019, 01:46 PM
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I did the same thing 25 years ago in FL... owner/builder designed and built my own home, took me two years while working full time and I did 85-90% of all the work myself. However, I just used what was common building materials and nothing really unique min materials and design, just well done. Money WAS and issue then, with 3 kids at the time, and then 4. I had a travel trailer on my property at the time (technically not allowed) . The bones of my home are as good as it comes.

Would I do it over? no! (maybe as the GC). Am I glad I did, yes. The hardest thing I ever did was lift, glue down (on trusses) and then hand nail 132 sheets of 5/8 plywood with, 10D hot dipped gal. nails, on my roof. I still hurt 25 yrs later just thinking about it.
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Old 01-03-2019, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by RyanL11 View Post
We went 2X6, and other than being stronger and better to insulate, you get 2 extra inches on your window sills, which adds a nice look.
this.

all about the sill look. looks way more custom when finished the right way.
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