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Rotary-stone for sharpening chain saw chain, anyone else ever use one?

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Rotary-stone for sharpening chain saw chain, anyone else ever use one?

Old 12-09-2018, 01:35 PM
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Default Rotary-stone for sharpening chain saw chain, anyone else ever use one?

I had a bunch of dull and broken chain saw files so I needed some new stuff as I had a lot of cutting to do as of late and my chain(s) needed to be touched up.

I had thought of using the rotary-wand I have and putting a stone sized correctly to sharpen all the cutters and had found that my local Lowe's had Oregon 5/32 that I needed so I had picked up a pack of 3 for $5. I also got a new file and a depth gauge for the depth gauges on the chain.

I had read that most keep the stone on the cutter for about 4 seconds or so and move onto the next cutter so that is what I did and boy, it was easy and quick using the rotary to touch up the chain.

After, a quick test had the chain cutting better than it has ever cut as I always filed the cutters by hand and while I'd always do a pretty good job, after having used the rotary and stone to sharpen the chain, it is going to be tough breaking out the hand file in the field after every tank of fuel. I might need to get a 12V rotary as they are not that much money and bring along a small 12V battery just because-easy. Easy and just sharp.
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Old 12-09-2018, 01:52 PM
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Works great, easy does it just a second or so, otherwise you’ll burn some life off of your chain, it’s soft steel.
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Old 12-09-2018, 01:54 PM
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Owned a tree service for a while. Used a rotary 12v a couple times a day if cutting a bunch. Sharpen before you think it needs it and don't get it too hot.
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Old 12-09-2018, 01:57 PM
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Originally Posted by tlepisto View Post
Works great, easy does it just a second or so, otherwise youíll burn some life off of your chain, itís soft steel.
Chain saw chain is high carbon steel and therefore hard steel.
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:01 PM
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Simple and work excellent. I don’t use a guide, hand held Drexel and.by eye
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by thundra View Post
I had a bunch of dull and broken chain saw files so I needed some new stuff as I had a lot of cutting to do as of late and my chain(s) needed to be touched up.

I had thought of using the rotary-wand I have and putting a stone sized correctly to sharpen all the cutters and had found that my local Lowe's had Oregon 5/32 that I needed so I had picked up a pack of 3 for $5. I also got a new file and a depth gauge for the depth gauges on the chain.

I had read that most keep the stone on the cutter for about 4 seconds or so and move onto the next cutter so that is what I did and boy, it was easy and quick using the rotary to touch up the chain.

After, a quick test had the chain cutting better than it has ever cut as I always filed the cutters by hand and while I'd always do a pretty good job, after having used the rotary and stone to sharpen the chain, it is going to be tough breaking out the hand file in the field after every tank of fuel. I might need to get a 12V rotary as they are not that much money and bring along a small 12V battery just because-easy. Easy and just sharp.
think rechargeable Drexel tool
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:20 PM
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If Drexel is the same thing as a Dremel then it works great for sharpening chain saw blades.
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:29 PM
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Used one for years, it had aligator clips to run off the truck battery. The Stones seemed to wear out rather quickly and I still carried a file in the case.
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:34 PM
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Never caught the hang of them. Can hand file quick enough that itís not an issue unless messing with dirty wood. Just keep a several spare chains with me and reserve worn chains for dirty wood. I have an Oregon 511 grinder to work them over if they get bad. Granted itís a stupid expensive grinder, but I didt pay anywhere close to full price for it.
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Garett View Post
Chain saw chain is high carbon steel and therefore hard steel.
the chain may well be but the actual cutters are relatively soft, thatís why they dull so easily if the overheat or tick a nail or sand. But the soft material allows them to be easily sharpened even with a hand file
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Old 12-09-2018, 03:26 PM
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Ineteresting gadget.

Never tried an electric. Was taught to use a round file and pay attention to the raker height.

I only use skip tooth chain so I only have half the teeth to file anyways. Get a skip tooth and cut down on sharpening.
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Old 12-09-2018, 04:00 PM
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I had a Stihl 12v sharpener, loved it. Once used though, don't expect to use a normal file afterwards.
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Old 12-09-2018, 04:20 PM
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I have been using a rotary tool for years (Dremel or clone) and I would not do it any other way. Down here, cutting up palm trees will kill a chain pretty fast but it only takes a few minutes to bring it back to life.
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Old 12-09-2018, 06:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Marlin308 View Post
If Drexel is the same thing as a Dremel then it works great for sharpening chain saw blades.
autocorrect I missed. Dremel.
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Old 12-09-2018, 07:09 PM
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I've been looking at this handheld Sharpening system. Gets good reviews. Need to ensure the proper pitch for your chains you're. Does the rake and cutter at the same time. There are a few you-tube videos for the Stihl 2 in 1.
https://m.stihlusa.com/products/chain-saws/filing-tools/2in1file/

Last edited by round2it; 12-09-2018 at 07:22 PM.
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Old 12-09-2018, 07:53 PM
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Been doing it with a dremel for years.
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Old 12-09-2018, 07:55 PM
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I have never tried one because most of the chainsaw work I do, I do in a place where electricity is hard to come by.

For anyone else in that boat I can heartily recommend the Pferd chainsaw sharpeners...they are basically a couple of files in a plastic case with steel guides that keep your cuts aligned and depth gauges set correctly.



A typical 24" bar will take me a couple of minutes to bring from "used it to cut dirt" to "could probably shave with it". It's a nice option for field sharpening.
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Old 12-10-2018, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by cracked_ribs View Post
I have never tried one because most of the chainsaw work I do, I do in a place where electricity is hard to come by.

For anyone else in that boat I can heartily recommend the Pferd chainsaw sharpeners...they are basically a couple of files in a plastic case with steel guides that keep your cuts aligned and depth gauges set correctly.



A typical 24" bar will take me a couple of minutes to bring from "used it to cut dirt" to "could probably shave with it". It's a nice option for field sharpening.
That is a nice design for sure.

If I were not hooked on the rotary stone/diamond, I'd consider it.

For the money, I might get a cheap-o cordless/rechargeable rotary at Harbor Freight and keep some stones handy for the field. It is just so much easier than the manual file.
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Old 12-10-2018, 07:14 AM
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Its been a while since I have cut wood (one of the many reasons I moved from the north), but I always thought that the teeth were mild steel. My uncles would tell stories of the older commercial chains that had hardened teeth that would snap off if you hit anything hard. We had a rotary tool (the motor hangs on a stand with a long hose to a bit), and a jig to get the angle right. I was taught to not let the teeth get to hot because they would harden and chip. We mostly cut old fence lines so hitting a nail, staple or old wire was quite common.
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Old 12-10-2018, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by tlepisto View Post

the chain may well be but the actual cutters are relatively soft, thatís why they dull so easily if the overheat or tick a nail or sand. But the soft material allows them to be easily sharpened even with a hand file
The whole chain is cut up and used in a canister style damascus knife blade; therefore the whole chain must be high carbon metal or otherwise one would never be able to get a hardenable edge on the knife.
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