Notices
Like Tree24Likes

Flooring for a nice house?

Old 11-16-2018, 05:52 PM
  #61  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: naples
Posts: 230
Default

Originally Posted by GulfC View Post
Actually TorFed is correct on retail buyers. They often if not most of the time do not have cash for much more than downpayment/closing costs. And even if they do, they DO NOT want to work on the house they're moving into. A house clean and ready to occupy without any work whatsoever has the best chance of getting the highest price possible. If the floors just match, they'll buy if it's in the right place at the right price. Really with any house/property anywhere, you're trying to get the positives to overcome the negatives for top price.
I don't disagree with that but like I said , SOMETIMES it doesn't make sense to remodel and you don't always get back what you put into it. I have seen houses where the remodel actually devalued the house, because it was to specific to the taste of the seller.

I actually walked away from a house that was beautifully remodeled because the house got flooded in iRMA. The seller gutted the whole inside including bathrooms,flooring,kitchen,walls,et and made it beautiful. The problem is that the house is in a floodzone and 6 feet below the mandated elevation. So in reality its only a matter time before it floods again . He would have likely been better off taking the Insurance money and selling the house 'as is' and as a tear down. Instead they are trying to sell the house for over 400K with documentation it has flooded and will likely flood again for being 6 ft under elevation.
alfnator is offline  
Old 11-16-2018, 06:03 PM
  #62  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Lewes, DE
Posts: 10,290
Default

Originally Posted by alfnator View Post
It depends .

Sure a remodeled move in ready home is more appealing and easier to sell, but money talks. If you can remodel and still be at a competitive price point for the area and sq footage than its worth it. Thats not always the case.

The problem is that buyers think if they put $25K into remodeling the house that they can get $50K+ back , which is not typically the case for the typical home buyer. The Flippers can do that because they buy the house cheap enough, do the work themselves or have contacts, and price it at the right price for the sq footage , based on location, and type of home it is.

The typical home owners putting $25K into a house that they likely paid at or above market value are likely to only get back $10k-$15K in the renovations. If you are adding Sq Ft to the home in the right location , that can a better chance to break even or make more money, but depending on going prices.

So while a renovated home is more appealing, your likely not going to get back what you put in to it unless you bought it cheap enough. then you have to gamble on others taste.

So if you have the designers touch to reach the masses ,the contacts to do the work cheap enough, right location and price points, then its worth it. Thats not always the case.

If the OP has neutral tile that is not horribly outdated it might be worth not spending the money on redoing it. Now if the tile is horrendous and cracked that is another thing. Even then I wouldn't expect to get my money back on the renovation cost if you paid top market dollars for the house and need to already sell at going rates before the reno. In most areas Houses top out on value.
It really doesn't depend unless you are going to extremes and theoreticals. OP is talking about a 'nice house'. People don't want to have to update a 'nice house.' In fact, needing the updates removes it from being a 'nice house' to most all buyers. If you poll 100 people you are going to get 75 not wanting to have to do a thing to the house. The general comment I hear repeatedly is " I am paying X for a house, I don't want to have to mess with reflooring the whole damn place."

I sell and have flipped houses for a living (not now with the elevated market). What you are referring to is called overbuilding. There are plenty of ways to get your investment back, but the difference is realizing what increases value, and what is a selling point, but doesn't add to value. You are coming up with assumptions to fit your point, and ignoring OP.

Originally Posted by alfnator View Post
I don't disagree with that but like I said , SOMETIMES it doesn't make sense to remodel and you don't always get back what you put into it. I have seen houses where the remodel actually devalued the house, because it was to specific to the taste of the seller.

I actually walked away from a house that was beautifully remodeled because the house got flooded in iRMA. The seller gutted the whole inside including bathrooms,flooring,kitchen,walls,et and made it beautiful. The problem is that the house is in a floodzone and 6 feet below the mandated elevation. So in reality its only a matter time before it floods again . He would have likely been better off taking the Insurance money and selling the house 'as is' and as a tear down. Instead they are trying to sell the house for over 400K with documentation it has flooded and will likely flood again for being 6 ft under elevation.
Yes, in rare instances, when a seller goes super specific to their own taste or picks a 'theme' that doesn't match the area (One around here is mediterranean with imported bricks from a historic church in Venice) they have problems. Another is one designed to be super modern by a Scandinavian architect. Would cost $2.5m to rebuild, can't sell it for $1m. So, while what you are talking about does exist, I would say it is maybe 1% or less of houses.
TorFed is offline  
Old 11-16-2018, 06:13 PM
  #63  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 3,909
Default

Originally Posted by alfnator View Post
I don't disagree with that but like I said , SOMETIMES it doesn't make sense to remodel and you don't always get back what you put into it. I have seen houses where the remodel actually devalued the house, because it was to specific to the taste of the seller.

I actually walked away from a house that was beautifully remodeled because the house got flooded in iRMA. The seller gutted the whole inside including bathrooms,flooring,kitchen,walls,et and made it beautiful. The problem is that the house is in a floodzone and 6 feet below the mandated elevation. So in reality its only a matter time before it floods again . He would have likely been better off taking the Insurance money and selling the house 'as is' and as a tear down. Instead they are trying to sell the house for over 400K with documentation it has flooded and will likely flood again for being 6 ft under elevation.
Absolutely, you walked for the reason I stated: " they'll buy if it's in the right place at the right price " It wasn't in the right place so you walked. I had a friend whose mother was in a devastated Texas town hit by a hurricane several years ago. He knew I was into real estate and asked me what I would do. She was 80 plus years old and just wanted out. I told him to put it on the market for more than he thought they could get for it right now. In disbelief he repeated the issue and I again asked if her house was flooded? It wasn't but was surrounded by flooded houses. So they stuck a sign in the yard and then got frustrated because it sold right away and the people (contracting company) wanted the house right then! They wanted her to leave the furniture and all. Real estate is all about emotions and need. I swear it seems sometimes you can tell folks the roof is about to collapse and if they're committed enough, they'll still buy it.
GulfC is offline  
Old 11-16-2018, 06:27 PM
  #64  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: naples
Posts: 230
Default

Originally Posted by TorFed View Post
It really doesn't depend unless you are going to extremes and theoreticals. OP is talking about a 'nice house'.
Whats a nice house? Do you have all the information to say what is best for this seller?

My original point was that its not ALWAYS an automatic smart thing to remodel . I'm not telling him not to do it or if its the right thing todo. Just stating that its not an automatic good thing todo for EVERYONE or CASE.

I don't know enough about the sellers house,his local market, how much he owes on it if anything, how much are homes going for in his area, if he remodels will he have to sell it above what the market would accept, does the house really need to be updated, have you seen it,etc?

Interest rates are going up and housing market may have peaked already according to many and lots of questions before I would tell someone , yeah its a good idea to spend $1000's on a remodel.

However, perhaps you are psychic and know whats best for him from a single post?

Last edited by alfnator; 11-16-2018 at 06:34 PM.
alfnator is offline  
Old 11-16-2018, 06:33 PM
  #65  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Surfside Beach, TX, USA
Posts: 2,474
Default

Buyers be crazy.

The house that ex-wife and me lived in for 30 years had a significant kitchen remodel in 2014. We invested about 15k then on new luxury tile, new stainless appliances, oak custom cabinets, Blue Pearl granite counter tops and back splashes.
The buyer (Iranian) demo'ed the whole kitchen, put in a different builder-grade painted cabinet, crappy bland tile, and Corian counter tops. Took away the island that had the built in Newtone power center (blender/food processor/etc,) Moved the oven over to the corner where he bricked-over a window. Sacrificed the big pantry to enlarge the walkway access from 3 feet to seven feet wide. Blocked off the second access to build a four foot wide pantry.

But his purchase, his choices.
savage is offline  
Old 11-16-2018, 06:40 PM
  #66  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Lewes, DE
Posts: 10,290
Default

Originally Posted by alfnator View Post
Whats a nice house? Do you have all the information to say what is best for this seller?

my original point was that its not ALWAYS an automatic smart thing to remodel . I don't know enough about the sellers house,his local market, how much he owes on it if anything, how much are homes going for in his area, if he remodels will he have to sell it above what the market would accept, does the house really need to be updated, have you seen it,etc?

Interest rates are going up and housing market may have peaked already according to many and lots of questions before I would tell someone , yeah its a good idea to spend $1000's on a remodel.

However, perhaps you are psychic and know whats best for him from a single post?
Take a deep breath before you have a heart attack. He said he is replacing his floors because they were damaged in a hurricane. His primary objective is replacing his floors and advice on flooring. He says he will probably sell it a few years down the road. He is asking what will appeal to upscale buyers. The house is on the water. They want nice, but not overly expensive. House is on the bungalow/cottage size sqft wise. Open floor plan. Plenty of info there.

He did not ask "should I replace my floors or offer a credit I'm selling my house." The dude needs to replace damaged flooring. As for "we don't know what type of shape it is in." We do. You are diverting it to an issue which is not at hand.

He didn't ask us if he should put new floors in, by the way, new floors is not a remodel. He asked what type of floors. Did you even read his post?
TorFed is offline  
Old 11-16-2018, 08:11 PM
  #67  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: naples
Posts: 230
Talking

Originally Posted by TorFed View Post
Take a deep breath before you have a heart attack.
My Breathing is just fine , ask the Wife, kidding. You made to easy to past up ;-)

anyhow,

He said he is replacing his floors because they were damaged in a hurricane. His primary objective is replacing his floors and advice on flooring
The original post mentions nothing about hurricane or being damaged see below or the OP. He said he just wanted to replace them and get a decent return on his investment. Thats what I was responding too, that your are not guaranteed always to get your money back it depends on the situation.

However, If the floor is damaged that's another thing, but even then it doesn't make it ALWAYS worthwhile to replace, but I agree for most cases it likely would when damaged.

My wife and I are redoing the flooring in our house and I would appreciate flooring recommendations. The house is a nice home that we will probably sell in a few years to downsize. It is in a nice neighborhood and on the water (fresh), so we want something that will appeal to the somewhat upscale buyers who will be looking at it. We want to install something nice, but not overly expensive. I guess the best way to put it is that we'd like a decent return for the money spent. I would like to avoid hardwood flooring mainly because I don't want to deal with the installation, sanding and finishing.

We have an open floor plan. Currently we have laminate (choice made to save money when building the home) in the entire area which encompasses the living room, dining room, kitchen and breakfast nook. We want something in the kitchen area that handles getting wet. There is a short wall and then bar/countertops that divide the floor area between the kitchen and living room. It looks kind of like the diagram below. We have columns with drywall extending down in arches from the ceiling to delineate the living room from the other rooms.

I'm thinking that the living room and dining room would have the same flooring, whereas the kitchen and breakfast nook would be a different flooring from living room. I don't care for standing on ceramic tile in the kitchen, though I guess we could put down soft rubber mats in the areas where we usually spend the most time. What are your thoughts on luxury vinyl planking in the kitchen and breakfast nook, and engineered wood in the living room/dining room? Any other ideas for something that would look nice yet not be crazy expensive?

The current flooring is just a bit over 1000 SF.

Thoughts?

Last edited by alfnator; 11-16-2018 at 08:24 PM.
alfnator is offline  
Old 11-16-2018, 08:22 PM
  #68  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Lewes, DE
Posts: 10,290
Default

Originally Posted by alfnator View Post
My Breathing is just fine , ask your Wife, kidding.

anyhow,



The original post mentions nothing about hurricane or being damaged see below or the OP. He said he just wanted to replace them and get a decent return on his investment. Thats what I was responding too, that your are not guaranteed always to get your money back it depends on the situation.

However, If the floor is damaged that's another thing, but even then it doesn't make it ALWAYS worthwhile to replace, but I agree for most cases it likely would when damaged.
Originally Posted by rickpcfl View Post
I know, sorry. I'm just not sure what the price range is. Our flooring is being replaced due to damage from the hurricane. I'm guessing we'll get about 10k for the existing flooring and can put another 3-5k with it.

If I can install it, then we can buy more expensive material. If I have to pay someone to install it, we'll probably have to go with something not quite as expensive

I forgot to mention that the area is probably about 1000 SF total.
Post #6.
TorFed is offline  
Old 11-16-2018, 08:36 PM
  #69  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: naples
Posts: 230
Default

Originally Posted by TorFed View Post
Post #6.
Like I said, My original reply was in regards to the original Post which was about getting a decent return on the money spent ,nothing about hurricane damage.

I present Exhibit 1 your honor: POST #1. LOL

and emphasis on
. I guess the best way to put it is that we'd like a decent return for the money spent.
alfnator is offline  
Old 11-17-2018, 01:30 AM
  #70  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Raleigh & Surf City, NC
Posts: 12,848
Default

So where are we on flooring for a nice house? We'll be breaking ground within a month or so and are still trying to figure this out. We have new lvp in our current house because it's piss and crap proof (small puppies). It looks great but I agree with a previous poster, it just doesn't have a tremendous feel of quality. It seems plasticy. We're leaning towards site finished hard woods. What type and how many coats of varnish will stand up to urine sitting on it for a few hrs?

We've always had dogs and always will. All of our previous dogs were large enough to hold it for several hrs when we were away. Our latest two are 8# and 12#. The 8 lbs of terror can't hold it long enough sometimes. These two replaced a 15# Jack Russell and a 90# Doberman mix who were both very well trained. We both decided on small dogs this time but it seems in my research it somehow escaped me that small dog = small bladder.
baypro21 is offline  
Old 11-17-2018, 05:11 AM
  #71  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,505
Default

Originally Posted by baypro21 View Post
So where are we on flooring for a nice house? We'll be breaking ground within a month or so and are still trying to figure this out. We have new lvp in our current house because it's piss and crap proof (small puppies). It looks great but I agree with a previous poster, it just doesn't have a tremendous feel of quality. It seems plasticy. We're leaning towards site finished hard woods. What type and how many coats of varnish will stand up to urine sitting on it for a few hrs?

We've always had dogs and always will. All of our previous dogs were large enough to hold it for several hrs when we were away. Our latest two are 8# and 12#. The 8 lbs of terror can't hold it long enough sometimes. These two replaced a 15# Jack Russell and a 90# Doberman mix who were both very well trained. We both decided on small dogs this time but it seems in my research it somehow escaped me that small dog = small bladder.
Yes, site finished hardwood is a very good choice. Select red or white oak. The white oak is slightly more moisture resistant. Remember that all wood floors will change size slightly with varying moisture content. This is why I discourage wider boards. 3.25 max. and 2.25 is better.

If using stain go 1 stain and 2 coats of poly. Satin is the best look in my opinion. Gloss and semi-gloss are slightly harder finish. It is ok to have first coat semi and top coat satin. It keeps the finish from looking too flat.

Adding coats is not a good idea as it builds up thickness and can actually make the finish softer.
Have hardwood in entire house and we always have dogs.
muskrattown is offline  
Old 11-17-2018, 05:51 AM
  #72  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Lewes, DE
Posts: 10,290
Default

Originally Posted by alfnator View Post
Like I said, My original reply was in regards to the original Post which was about getting a decent return on the money spent ,nothing about hurricane damage.

I present Exhibit 1 your honor: POST #1. LOL

and emphasis on
Only on THT would someone take pride in only reading a portion of the information provided.

Originally Posted by muskrattown View Post
Yes, site finished hardwood is a very good choice. Select red or white oak. The white oak is slightly more moisture resistant. Remember that all wood floors will change size slightly with varying moisture content. This is why I discourage wider boards. 3.25 max. and 2.25 is better.

If using stain go 1 stain and 2 coats of poly. Satin is the best look in my opinion. Gloss and semi-gloss are slightly harder finish. It is ok to have first coat semi and top coat satin. It keeps the finish from looking too flat.

Adding coats is not a good idea as it builds up thickness and can actually make the finish softer.
Have hardwood in entire house and we always have dogs.
Same for dogs and hardwoods. I have a few extra cases of the wood in the attic to replace any pieces that get too beat up by dog claws. Also, as long as you let the wood adjust for a few days to the environment in which it will be laid, you shouldn't have too much problem with the wood swelling/contracting.
TorFed is offline  
Old 11-17-2018, 06:42 AM
  #73  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: naples
Posts: 230
Default

Originally Posted by TorFed View Post
Only on THT would someone take pride in only reading a portion of the information provided.
.
Only on tht would someone give firm advice on something they dont have all the info on. That portion is what the post was written about btw. Do you always read every post on a thread to reply, likely not, its a freaking boating forum not an exam or court hearing.

like i said i replied to his original post and stated that lots of variables can determine if you will get your money back. This applies to even damaged homes, unlike yourself who gives canned advice that its always good idea to spend the money.

perhaps you are as good at fishing as you are a realtor?

actually if he wants to save money money he should look into listing the house on mls for 300-500 bucks with an online service and give the buyer 3% commission and 0 commission to a listing agent..

Pay a real estate attorney 500 bucks to provide and review the contract when he has a buyer and sell the house for around 1k-2k at most versus paying 3% to the listing agent. Just call your local real estate attorney before hand , so you know who to use when you get the buyer and understand the process.

anyhow i feel like we are married with all this bickering, even though my point still stands that you are not automatically guaranteed a return on your investment, i will reply back with yes dear.

Last edited by alfnator; 11-17-2018 at 07:02 AM.
alfnator is offline  
Old 11-17-2018, 07:02 AM
  #74  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Lewes, DE
Posts: 10,290
Default

Originally Posted by alfnator View Post
Only on tht would someone give firm advice on something they dont have all the info on. That portion is what the post was written about btw. Do you always read every post on a thread to reply, likely not, its a freaking boating forum not an exam or court hearing.

like i said i replied to his original post and stated that lots of variables can determine if you will get your money back. This applies to even damaged homes, unlike yourself who gives canned advice that its always good idea to spend the money.

perhaps you are as good at fishing as you are a realtor?

actually if he wants to save money money he should look into listing the house on mls for 300-500 bucks with an online service and give the buyer 3% commission and 0 commission to a listing agent..

Pay a real estate attorney 500 bucks to write up the contract when he has a buyer and save himself 3% commission from the listing agent and sell the house for around 1k. Just call your local real estate attorney before hand so you know who to use when you get the buyer.

anyhow i feel like we are married with all this bickering, even though my point still stands that you are not automatically guaranteed a return on your investment, i will reply back with yes dear.
Touchy.

Having flipped 20 or so properties and turned a profit on all but one (about $500 off of breaking even) , and deal with what he is referring to for a living, with the info he provided and about 5 min online, yes, I do feel I can make an educated opinion. Being on retainer essentially as a consultant to a few investors who have me help them select properties to flip, and advise on what to focus $ on in renovations. Hundreds of clients and one complaint (of someone who made me break their contract two days before settlement to re-rent their home), must be doing something right. Hell, have helped dozens on here who have reached out to me from all over the country with questions. I'm not concerned with your evaluation of my professional prowess (or attempt at stating a lack there-of). But, I mean, you are probably just as qualified to comment because you are pissy about one home sale, and have a half dozen or so under your belt. Did you sleep at a Holiday Inn Express while watching HGTV last night?

Don't want to use a real estate agent, don't. Simple concept. But that doesn't give you the right to state that I am shitty at my job.

Last edited by TorFed; 11-17-2018 at 07:12 AM.
TorFed is offline  
Old 11-17-2018, 07:11 AM
  #75  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: naples
Posts: 230
Default

Originally Posted by TorFed View Post
Touchy. Having flipped 20 or so properties and turned a profit on all but one, and deal with what he is referring to for a living, with the info he provided and about 5 min online, yes, I do feel I can make an educated opinion. Hundreds of clients and one complaint (of someone who made me break their contract two days before settlement to re-rent their home), must be doing something right.
yes dear,

Go ahead and give firm canned advice to a stranger online who you have no idea about their local market,financial situation, real current state of their home, and a Godzillian other variables.

i will continue to suggest, you could get your ROI back but its not an automatic thing as other variables come into play and do your research. I know crazy, here im advocating doing some research and play with the number to see if it really makes sense for him.
alfnator is offline  
Old 11-17-2018, 08:50 AM
  #76  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Jax, Fl
Posts: 4,064
Default

TorFed likes this.
fijon is offline  
Old 12-05-2018, 05:17 AM
  #77  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Between Richmond and Williamsburg
Posts: 2,964
Default

Originally Posted by baypro21 View Post
So where are we on flooring for a nice house? We'll be breaking ground within a month or so and are still trying to figure this out. We have new lvp in our current house because it's piss and crap proof (small puppies). It looks great but I agree with a previous poster, it just doesn't have a tremendous feel of quality. It seems plasticy. We're leaning towards site finished hard woods. What type and how many coats of varnish will stand up to urine sitting on it for a few hrs?

We've always had dogs and always will. All of our previous dogs were large enough to hold it for several hrs when we were away. Our latest two are 8# and 12#. The 8 lbs of terror can't hold it long enough sometimes. These two replaced a 15# Jack Russell and a 90# Doberman mix who were both very well trained. We both decided on small dogs this time but it seems in my research it somehow escaped me that small dog = small bladder.
I always reccomend to people I build for that have dogs to use use Bona Traffic ( used to be called Bonaseal Traffic). It's an extremely durable finish
twobyfour is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread