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Nicest car I've ever seen

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Old 11-07-2018, 07:49 PM
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For when you've put the kids' toys away and want to enjoy a Christmas treat of your own..........
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Old 11-07-2018, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Domoe View Post


Sorry its the only picture i took of it.
Is that one of Rick Hendrick's? When I was viewing his car collection he had one that I recall being just like that. Full modern drive train with a classic body, all massaged to fit together seamlessly.
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Old 11-07-2018, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by yachtjim View Post
Is that one of Rick Hendrick's? When I was viewing his car collection he had one that I recall being just like that. Full modern drive train with a classic body, all massaged to fit together seamlessly.
the guy that owns it is out of New Orleans, I think his name is Lamar
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Old 11-07-2018, 08:18 PM
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I'd take classic boat tail Riv over anything.

Dream car!
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Old 11-07-2018, 09:41 PM
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Here's my fathers survivor car 1962 327/340 with 56,000 miles, all original but the tires.
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Old 11-07-2018, 10:46 PM
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mine

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Old 11-08-2018, 04:05 AM
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Went to a large out door regional car show this summer, hundreds of cars, out of them all this was my favorite, street/strip dodge dart.

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Old 11-08-2018, 04:33 AM
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THIS.....Hands down........
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Old 11-08-2018, 05:48 AM
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That's a sweet 'vette. Not crazy about the ghetto wheels but I wouldn't refuse the car because of them.

My dream cars currently go like this:

1970 Chevelle Malibu 2dr hardtop coupe. 350/300 w/ powerglide. Pretty much all stock. Built for cruise-ins and date nights. This was basically my first car.


1970 GMC Sprint. Hotchkiss TVS kit. LSX engine. For a daily driver.

Factory 5 Type 65 Coupe. Coyote Engine. Built for race day/track car but fully streetable.



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Old 11-08-2018, 06:08 AM
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My dream car is the Factory Five 35 Hot Rod Truck, but by the time if I ever make it a reality, it will be like one of those Garage Squad shows on TV, my daughters saying, this was dad's dream car he was building in the garage but he died half way through it, lol.

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Old 11-08-2018, 06:59 AM
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With all these online auctions making rich wallet types who want a nice car without actually restoring it themselves quite common, we see prices of average old cars skyrocketing. A few decades ago I always envisioned myself picking up an older Mopar in my later years, like a 'Cuda or Challenger...somewhere around '69 or '70..and fixing it up in my garage.

But as these online auctions started getting popular, "flipping" old cars has become a career for many people, so finding old garage/barn finds....they're cost prohibitive now. Look around..you'll see old rust bucket examples of classic muscle going for near 20 grand if not more, even though they're not even driveable yet. Because the market knows these car flippers will pay premiums for them just to fix up and sell for high $$$ at auctions.

Even cars we considered not so desirable back in high school, old rusty Novas, Scamps, Maverick grabbers, they're all going at premiums now.
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Old 11-08-2018, 07:24 AM
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I like restomods. A 280z with a LS1 and modern suspension is on my short list. Just love the lines of a 280z.

Staring at cars I can't afford doesn't do it for me.



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Old 11-08-2018, 07:28 AM
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I am partial to these two.
My 2018 Grand Sport and the 1965 327/4spd Coupe that I sold earlier this year after 29 years of ownership.
For the past 10 years or so, after I finished its last restoration to near NCRS top-flight specs, it became essentially a museum piece sitting in the garage that I wasn't using more than about 200 miles a year and with the market for C2 Corvettes being as hot as it is, it was time to part with it.
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Old 11-08-2018, 07:37 AM
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heres mine,
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Old 11-08-2018, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by YeOldeStonecat View Post
.........................

But as these online auctions started getting popular, "flipping" old cars has become a career for many people, so finding old garage/barn finds....they're cost prohibitive now. Look around..you'll see old rust bucket examples of classic muscle going for near 20 grand if not more, even though they're not even driveable yet. Because the market knows these car flippers will pay premiums for them just to fix up and sell for high $$$ at auctions..................
Proof that we are in a bubble and due for a downturn. The EXACT same thing was going on in the early 2000's. I remember watching all these car flip it shows on discovery channel and speedvision. The same crap as today. People paying lots of money for rust buckets that were $500 a few years prior. When people can "make money" doing full frame off restorations of cars and even making clone cars, it's good proof to me that [bad] change is coming. After 2008 all these cars took a HUGE beating and that whole industry almost vanished.
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Old 11-08-2018, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by johnny.dollar View Post
Proof that we are in a bubble and due for a downturn. The EXACT same thing was going on in the early 2000's. I remember watching all these car flip it shows on discovery channel and speedvision. The same crap as today. People paying lots of money for rust buckets that were $500 a few years prior. When people can "make money" doing full frame off restorations of cars and even making clone cars, it's good proof to me that [bad] change is coming. After 2008 all these cars took a HUGE beating and that whole industry almost vanished.
I agree to an extent. There is a lot more going on under the hood than that though. When the economy is flush with disposable cash, people look to spend it. Classic muscle cars have shown over the years to perform rather well as an investment so those who know their cars and have the cash to invest are willing to pay top dollar for "investment grade" examples of classic cars. These are not restomods that started out as rust buckets. These are all original, low mileage, well optioned, rust free cars, or cars that were in this condition and then restored to show room condition. When the average blue collar joe turns on the TV and sees a Meccum or Jackson Barrett type auction taking place, he automatically assumes the rust bucket in his backyard "must be worth a lot of money" because a mint version of the same care just sold for $65K+. So he starts advertising it on Craigslist or Letgo and asking top dollar. Some less than knowing individuals that have no idea what it costs to do a top shelf restoration will buy these rust buckets with the intention of turning them into and investment car but they usually end up selling them for less than they have put in them and in many cases they are in boxes when they are sold. This drives up the value of the true investment cars even more as it makes the number of complete, numbers matching and factory accurate cars even fewer.

All collectible items are like this. Baseball cards, art, antique furniture, pottery, vintage toys, etc. The value of the true collectibles is pretty solid, it's the clones and coat tail riders that suffer in an economic downturn.

I won;t deny that there is likely a market correction going to happen.

These are the reasons that I actually think a car Factory Five Racing puts out is a great value. You get all the looks and performance of a modern, track day car, with all the looks and style of a vintage sports car, for a fraction of what you would pay for a poorly done rustomod. I call that good value. Hard to say what a Factory Five coupe might be worth in 50 years. Numbers are certainly less than many production counterparts and performance is undeniable with an added measure of reliability and parts availability.
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Old 11-08-2018, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by MrWesson View Post
I like restomods. A 280z with a LS1 and modern suspension is on my short list. Just love the lines of a 280z.
A guy that lives sorta near me did a fantastic restoration on a 240z a couple of years ago...I often see him driving down the road in the summer. Did a nice restoration with a little bit of period authentic upgrades...like remember those dual tipped Monza exhausts? And BBS rims.
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Old 11-08-2018, 12:11 PM
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I lived in Phoenix many years and went to Barrett-Jackson almost every year.
As a result, I have close to 200 favorite cars
I did have the honor of going on stage with a friend that had a Torino drag pack car. He got $58k for it. Was hoping for $70k
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Old 11-08-2018, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by 1blueheron View Post
I agree to an extent. There is a lot more going on under the hood than that though. When the economy is flush with disposable cash, people look to spend it. Classic muscle cars have shown over the years to perform rather well as an investment so those who know their cars and have the cash to invest are willing to pay top dollar for "investment grade" examples of classic cars. These are not restomods that started out as rust buckets. These are all original, low mileage, well optioned, rust free cars, or cars that were in this condition and then restored to show room condition..............
To add another thought (and I agree with what you said), there is also a big driver in the "value" of these "investments"...nostalgia. Ford model A's and Duesenbergs and old 1920's and 1930's cars used to be the high dollar "investments". I bet they are worth much less today as the age group that grew up with those cars is now mostly dead. The muscle cars brought huge premiums, but as boomers become less relevant, those will lose value. Recently the huge increase in air cooled Porsche. I am no means a close follower of classic car values, and these comments are just quick observation.

"Antique" furniture used to bring tons of $$$ (remember the antique road show TV show?). Now with all the old people dying, the market is flooded with the stuff and the value is nil.

https://www.nextavenue.org/nobody-wants-parents-stuff/

Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents’ Stuff

Advice for boomers desperate to unload family heirlooms

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Old 11-08-2018, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by johnny.dollar View Post
To add another thought (and I agree with what you said), there is also a big driver in the "value" of these "investments"...nostalgia. Ford model A's and Duesenbergs and old 1920's and 1930's cars used to be the high dollar "investments". I bet they are worth much less today as the age group that grew up with those cars is now mostly dead. The muscle cars brought huge premiums, but as boomers become less relevant, those will lose value. Recently the huge increase in air cooled Porsche. I am no means a close follower of classic car values, and these comments are just quick observation.

"Antique" furniture used to bring tons of $$$ (remember the antique road show TV show?). Now with all the old people dying, the market is flooded with the stuff and the value is nil.

https://www.nextavenue.org/nobody-wants-parents-stuff/

Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents’ Stuff

Advice for boomers desperate to unload family heirlooms

True. My son who is 16 bought a 1987 camaro. 3rd gen camaros today are mostly getting gutted for drag cars or going to the crusher. GM has not released the copyright on the sheetmetal for reproduction which makes them tough to restore. Will they ever be of collector value? I don't know. They certainly have potential. You can buy one complete for $500. Who would have dreamed a '66 nova would ever be highly sought after? If they do become collectible, I suspect it will be like most investments... Buy low and sell high, otherwise lose your shirt.
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