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AE flood zone water front home

Old 11-04-2018, 07:57 PM
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Default AE flood zone water front home

Thinking about buying a home on the imperial river n bonita that is in an AE flood zone. It flooded once that i know for sure. During irma . Seller says only about an inch in the house but they replaced all base boards cabinetry and flooring. And 4 ft of wall.

Is there any actual door systems or dry flood prevention system that anyone has used to prevent flooding 1 foot or less.

the home is block with tile flooring.

love the house just not sure if worth the risk or hassle of dealing with floods. I have been told not if but when.it will occur again.

the newer houses around it are at higher elevation. Should i run forest run ?

other option is buying land and raise elevation then build but dirt aint cheap from what i have been told and impact fees.are not fun.
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Last edited by alfnator; 11-04-2018 at 08:09 PM.
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Old 11-04-2018, 08:55 PM
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Last option. Buy land and build a house on big wooden "sticks" pile-driven in. Put no structure or walls on the ground level.
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Old 11-05-2018, 02:16 AM
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Never build in a hole.
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Old 11-05-2018, 02:18 AM
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Have you checked the cost of insurance? That may answer the question for you.
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Old 11-05-2018, 03:48 AM
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Originally Posted by GaryDoug View Post
Last option. Buy land and build a house on big wooden "sticks" pile-driven in. Put no structure or walls on the ground level.
This
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Old 11-05-2018, 04:00 AM
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Does the house have an elevation certificate? That can determine cost of insurance . After I had mine done the insurance went from 2800.00 to 500.00
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Old 11-05-2018, 04:22 AM
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Originally Posted by fireisland1 View Post
Does the house have an elevation certificate? That can determine cost of insurance . After I had mine done the insurance went from 2800.00 to 500.00
we are trying to get the elevation certificate. Current owner stated they paid around 1840 for flood insurance.

We were thinking more around 2500
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Old 11-05-2018, 04:23 AM
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I am not sure I would bet on some of these systems, but I do like the Aqua Dam idea.

Aqua Dam, The Original Water Filled Cofferdam.

https://hydrabarrier.com/collections/hydrabarrier

Flood Barriers | Removable Flood Walls - Flood Control America

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...C9B8&FORM=VIRE
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Old 11-05-2018, 05:01 AM
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Originally Posted by alfnator View Post
we are trying to get the elevation certificate. Current owner stated they paid around 1840 for flood insurance. We were thinking more around 2500
If they are paying more than $600/yr (for $250k/$100k policy) the house is too low in elevation for the flood zone it is in.
Run Forrest Run.
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Old 11-05-2018, 05:26 AM
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A little background info on Flood Zones. In my state every square foot of property is in a flood zone. I classify them as the good, the bad and the ugly. The good is Zone B,C or X. In these zones there are no Federal elevation requirements for the lowest floor of a structure known as base flood elevations (BFE) although there can be requirements imposed by the local government agency. Flood insurance is optional with a mortgage. Quite often you will here home owners say "I'm not in a flood zone", what they really mean is that they are in a Zone B,C or X.

The ugly are coastal areas designated as Zone V. There is a federal elevation requirement for the lowest floor of a structure "BFE" that can be quite high when compared to the ground elevation. Most buildings are on pilings with very little structure built underneath. Flood insurance is mandatory with a mortgage.

The bad is Zone A either with a letter or number behind it, in your case it's a Zone AE. There is a federal elevation requirement for the lowest floor of a structure "BFE" that can be anywhere from just above the ground elevation to many feet above it. Depending on how high the BFE is compared to the ground elevation, structures can be built with a slab on fill, piers or pilings. Flood insurance is mandatory with a mortgage.

Flood Insurance. For Zones B,C or X since there isn't a federal elevation requirement, if the home owner wants flood insurance most will pay the same assuming the same coverage and deductions. For V and A zones the insurance is based upon how high the lowest floor of the structure is compared to how high it it suppose to be. This information is stated on an elevation certificate. The premiums will be different depending if the lowest floor is above the BFE, at the BFE or below the BFE. The difference can be large.

I would recommend you compare the elevation of the lowest floor of the structure to the current federal required BFE. Flood Zones do change, so while the house may have been in compliance at the time it was built, check it against today's BFE. Flooding is all about risk. The higher above the BFE the lower the risk .

If considering building on a vacant lot, hire a licensed surveyor to check the ground elevation near the center of the proposed structure. Check that elevation it against the BFE. This will tell you how high above the ground level you need to build. As examples Ground elev. = 25 and BFE is 27 you need to build up two feet. Ground elev. = 25 and BFE is 31 then you need to build up six feet. In addition check with the local Floodplain Administrator, they may have building requirements above and beyond the federal requirements which is called free board.

Personally I would buy a structure only if the lowest floor is at least one foot above the current BFE. If building new, I would design the lowest floor at least two feet above the BFE.
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Old 11-05-2018, 05:57 AM
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I just got a quote for $795 for a $200,000 home in AE8. House is 30 years old and has never flooded. I would imagine you'll be paying $4000/yr plus depending in actual elevation, maybe much more in that house. Really comes down to how much risk you want to accept, or if ins. is required with a mortgage. Chances are it will never flood again in your lifetime, but......
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Old 11-05-2018, 06:19 AM
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I built a home in an AE flood zone. Tore down an existing home and rebuilt. The old home had been flooded multiple times and was vacant for many years before I acquired it. My solution to flooding was to build up. No living space on the ground floor, just garage and entry. My neighbor's home is all on grade and has been flooded many times, but each time it was refurbished. They pay about 6 times what I pay in flood insurance.
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Old 11-05-2018, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by phillyg View Post
Chances are it will never flood again in your lifetime, but......
Around here, people whose homes flooded in 2011 during Hurricane Irene, a once in 50 year storm, were told the same thing, and then came Sandy, a once in 300 year storm in 2012 - no home that flooded in Irene did not also flood in Sandy.
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Old 11-05-2018, 06:52 AM
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Yeah I'm going into it knowing "not if" , "but when" it floods kind of thinking.

I did talk to an engineering company today and they did say they can do an elevation inspection ($1500) and recommend best type of barriers for the doors to prevent a flood and manufactures.

The Engineer is also familiar with the area and said that where the house is you are better off because its in the wider part of the river versus up the river near the downtown area.

She said she wouldn't walk away from it.
However , I'm debating to order the $1500 test now or later after when the sale is complete incase we walk away from the deal. She appeared to be confident in measures that would minimize the risk on a 2' foot flood range as she has done them in business areas befoer in downtown where it floods more. She estimated 3 doors around $5K to barrier, but forget to ask if that included the garage.
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Old 11-05-2018, 06:53 AM
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Originally Posted by LI32 View Post
Around here, people whose homes flooded in 2011 during Hurricane Irene, a once in 50 year storm, were told the same thing, and then came Sandy, a once in 300 year storm in 2012 - no home that flooded in Irene did not also flood in Sandy.
The term "100-year flood" is misleading because it leads people to believe that it happens only once every 100 years. The truth is that a flood can happen any year or several consecutive years in a row. The term "100-year flood" is really a statistical designation, and there is a 1-in-100 chance that a flood this size will happen during any year.

Keep in mind "During the span of a 30-year mortgage, a home in the 1-percent AEP (100-year) floodplain has a 26-percent chance of being flooded at least once during those 30 years!
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Old 11-05-2018, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by alfnator View Post
Yeah I'm going into it knowing "not if" , "but when" it floods kind of thinking.

I did talk to an engineering company today and they did say they can do an elevation inspection ($1500) and recommend best type of barriers for the doors to prevent a flood and manufactures.

The Engineer is also familiar with the area and said that where the house is you are better off because its in the wider part of the river versus up the river near the downtown area.

She said she wouldn't walk away from it.
However , I'm debating to order the $1500 test now or later after when the sale is complete incase we walk away from the deal. She appeared to be confident in measures that would minimize the risk on a 2' foot flood range as she has done them in business areas befoer in downtown where it floods more. She estimated 3 doors around $5K to barrier, but forget to ask if that included the garage.
I went in to my project with the same mindset. When it will flood, not if. You could look at the $1500 for the engineering inspection like the money you'd spend on a marine survey before buying a new boat. Cheaper to get it done before you buy than you buy it and deal with a mess.

Originally Posted by rod-n-reel View Post
The term "100-year flood" is misleading because it leads people to believe that it happens only once every 100 years. The truth is that a flood can happen any year or several consecutive years in a row. The term "100-year flood" is really a statistical designation, and there is a 1-in-100 chance that a flood this size will happen during any year.
This is correct. There is a 1% chance on any given year that a 100 year storm will happen.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:02 AM
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Run
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:03 AM
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Did I mention, run!
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Old 11-05-2018, 09:49 AM
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Ok got a copy of the elevation certificate and survey.

Yikes
The finished floor is at an Elev of. 4.0'. The areas required elevation for new homes is an Elev. of 10' . So if I were to build a new house It would be required to be 6'-0" above the elevation of the house we are looking at.

Not looking Good. According to the seller it only flooded during irma. However, being 6' below the new required code ordinance, I can only think it will flood more often than just with a direct hit like IRMA. I'm thinking that property is likely to flood more frequent than just during major natural events.

I have my jogging shoes on right now, but leaning to put on the sprinting shoes .

Talked to the insurance agent who is family he said in the last 14 years he hasn't seen a property having the lowest point more than 5' below the ordinance. this one would be 6.5 below. the garage top slab is also only 3.5 ' elevation.













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Old 11-05-2018, 10:28 AM
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The hydrabarrier where it only covers the doors looks interesting since the house is block and would only have to worry about the 3 doors and garage.

Thanks
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