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Tell me about Nanotechnology??

Old 08-16-2018, 08:24 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Obvious View Post
"nano" might come in close second place to "literally" as being the most misused word. Too many companies have latched onto it as a cool buzzword to sell their crap. Actual nanotechnology is pretty cool though.
Or the word "extreme", everything has become extreme. I got a quote from a house cleaning company I saw on a bulletin board, the quote came from a company called "Most Extreme Cleaning". After seeing the name I was to ascared to have them clean my house!

If you have a business with "extreme" in the name does it mean you are officially an "extremist"?
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Old 08-17-2018, 04:03 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by nccoaster View Post
Below is everything published on nanotechnology.

You just have to zoom in to read it, it is written with Buckyballs.



Interesting read
Link must be broken. You should have used graphene. Makes a much stronger link.
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Old 08-17-2018, 04:48 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by tprice View Post
I am Board Chair of our local school Board of trustees and yesterday we had our “opening day” ceremony for all employees of our district . We had a guest speaker yesterday by name of Dr Bill Daggett. He was talking about technology and how the public education system will have to adapt


More of a rant, but don't you love it when some "really smart person" states how the public education system will have to adapt (aka change in some mysterious undefined way). If the education system can't "support this type of technology", then how was it invented or discovered? With all these "new technologies", rarely does the underlying science and math change; it's sometimes discovery, but more often further refinement of existing. It is highly doubtful that discovery will occur in the public school setting (grades 1 - 12) for many reasons. But I feel it is safe to say that discover is made more difficult without knowing where to look. Knowing where to look comes from a thorough and complete understanding of existing math and science basics and how the basics apply to areas beyond the test, and not just building some stick bridge.

In education, I think a narrow focus is problematic. I'm glad I was able to learn basic, cobalt, and fortran.
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Old 08-17-2018, 07:20 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by tprice View Post



NO TECHNOLOGY can fix some things 😂
its called chloroform! look it up. very high success rate!
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Old 08-17-2018, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by chrisjb View Post
More of a rant, but don't you love it when some "really smart person" states how the public education system will have to adapt (aka change in some mysterious undefined way). If the education system can't "support this type of technology", then how was it invented or discovered? With all these "new technologies", rarely does the underlying science and math change; it's sometimes discovery, but more often further refinement of existing. It is highly doubtful that discovery will occur in the public school setting (grades 1 - 12) for many reasons. But I feel it is safe to say that discover is made more difficult without knowing where to look. Knowing where to look comes from a thorough and complete understanding of existing math and science basics and how the basics apply to areas beyond the test, and not just building some stick bridge.

In education, I think a narrow focus is problematic. I'm glad I was able to learn basic, cobalt, and fortran.
COBOL COmmon Business Oriented Language.
FORTRAN FORmula TRANslation.
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Old 08-17-2018, 08:29 AM
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I'm already the master at boating small fish . . . don't need nano gear.
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Old 08-17-2018, 08:36 AM
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Nanotechnology is nothing more than the use of technology measured in nanometers and specifically in the range of 1-100 nanometers. A nanometer is 0.001 micrometer. It is still relatively large unit by some standards. As an example, the smallest physical unit of measurement presently known to man is called Planck Length. It's value is numerically expressed as 1.616 199(97) × 10−35 m. In more common terms, it is the smallest anything in the universe can be and still exist before it reaches theoretical nothingness. If you want to insult someones manhood, refer to them as Planck Length. Gives new meaning to the term laying plank. LOL

I work with Fiber Optics most every day. The fiber itself is measured in microns. The frequency of the light which commonly transmits data over the fiberoptics is measured in nanometers. Typical frequency is 850nm. It would qualify as nano technology if it were only 8.5 times smaller.


The future is certainly vast for nanotech, things like nanowires, and memristors will drastically alter the computers of tomorrow. Imagine computers that require no boot cycle when powered on and no standby power to retain vast memory banks.
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Old 08-17-2018, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by 1blueheron View Post
Nanotechnology is nothing more than the use of technology measured in nanometers and specifically in the range of 1-100 nanometers. A nanometer is 0.001 micrometer. It is still relatively large unit by some standards. As an example, the smallest physical unit of measurement presently known to man is called Planck Length. It's value is numerically expressed as 1.616 199(97) × 10−35 m. In more common terms, it is the smallest anything in the universe can be and still exist before it reaches theoretical nothingness. If you want to insult someones manhood, refer to them as Planck Length. Gives new meaning to the term laying plank. LOL

I work with Fiber Optics most every day. The fiber itself is measured in microns. The frequency of the light which commonly transmits data over the fiberoptics is measured in nanometers. Typical frequency is 850nm. It would qualify as nano technology if it were only 8.5 times smaller.


The future is certainly vast for nanotech, things like nanowires, and memristors will drastically alter the computers of tomorrow. Imagine computers that require no boot cycle when powered on and no standby power to retain vast memory banks.
Of course, you are referring to the light's wavelength, in nanometers, not the frequency. There is a mathematical relationship between the two, but 850nm is the wavelength. Frequency equals speed of light divided by wavelength.
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Old 08-17-2018, 05:08 PM
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That hz.
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Old 08-17-2018, 05:09 PM
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To humbly disagree, nanotechnology is much much more than simply using technology on the nanoscale. It’s the fabrication, design, manipulation and control on the nanoscale, or atomic scale. That’s why graphene, carbon nanotubes, quantum dots are so special.

To the OP, if you’d like to chat more about this, send me your number and i’d be more than happy to chat




Originally Posted by 1blueheron View Post
Nanotechnology is nothing more than the use of technology measured in nanometers and specifically in the range of 1-100 nanometers. A nanometer is 0.001 micrometer. It is still relatively large unit by some standards. As an example, the smallest physical unit of measurement presently known to man is called Planck Length. It's value is numerically expressed as 1.616 199(97) × 10−35 m. In more common terms, it is the smallest anything in the universe can be and still exist before it reaches theoretical nothingness. If you want to insult someones manhood, refer to them as Planck Length. Gives new meaning to the term laying plank. LOL

I work with Fiber Optics most every day. The fiber itself is measured in microns. The frequency of the light which commonly transmits data over the fiberoptics is measured in nanometers. Typical frequency is 850nm. It would qualify as nano technology if it were only 8.5 times smaller.


The future is certainly vast for nanotech, things like nanowires, and memristors will drastically alter the computers of tomorrow. Imagine computers that require no boot cycle when powered on and no standby power to retain vast memory banks.
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Old 08-17-2018, 08:04 PM
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I think this guy is holding nano nanotechnology in his arm.
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