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Quit Drinking

Old 07-11-2018, 07:20 AM
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I commend you for getting to this decision on your own.

Good luck!
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:37 AM
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Thanks for the support guys. I think I will refrain from drinking on this fishing trip. I already poured out all of the alcohol last week, no need to question my thinking from then.

Good luck to anyone suffering with this disease.
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:38 AM
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If anyone wants to tell me I don't know what the fuck I'm talking about, I'll accept that...

Truth is I don't have an addiction problem... I drink maybe one drink a month...(If that)...Now, that wasn't always the case. When I was in HS and college, drinking was all part of the social atmosphere...and I drank to excess like most students on the weekends, etc...But what changed it for me was becoming a bartender.... Two things happened....One, I saw what drunk college students were really like on the other side of the bar...Two, I saw some bartenders were in the career because of their drinking habit...Neither thing appealed to me and it was an eye opener. So I was fortunate that very early I had an experience that turned me off to drinking much....That bartending job was a life lesson in human behavior... But, my point is, I could relate to what you were saying about being sober and seeing how others who were drunk were acting....The world is a great and very different place when you're not inebriated.

The second thing I wanted to mention is I watched a Tim Ferris podcast on addiction once and I found it very interesting. The guest was a psychiatrist, I think from Hungary, and he was discussing what he delt with with his own addictions and what he's learned over the years...Perhaps you might want to search and find the episode, it might help....Basically, his belief is if you want to stop an addiction you need to do the work and find out what in your childhood might be causing the behavior....In other words, don't just think you can focus on the drinking without looking at the possible underlying childhood causes behind it....Though, don't be thinking this is victimization type talk... Not like that at all....

Anyways, I jumped in here to offer support and good luck....You know the right thing to do and I wish you and others with the issue, well.
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by TonyStark View Post
If anyone wants to tell me I don't know what the fuck I'm talking about, I'll accept that...

Truth is I don't have an addiction problem... I drink maybe one drink a month...(If that)...Now, that wasn't always the case. When I was in HS and college, drinking was all part of the social atmosphere...and I drank to excess like most students on the weekends, etc...But what changed it for me was becoming a bartender.... Two things happened....One, I saw what drunk college students were really like on the other side of the bar...Two, I saw some bartenders were in the career because of their drinking habit...Neither thing appealed to me and it was an eye opener. So I was fortunate that very early I had an experience that turned me off to drinking much....That bartending job was a life lesson in human behavior... But, my point is, I could relate to what you were saying about being sober and seeing how others who were drunk were acting....The world is a great and very different place when you're not inebriated.

The second thing I wanted to mention is I watched a Tim Ferris podcast on addiction once and I found it very interesting. The guest was a psychiatrist, I think from Hungary, and he was discussing what he delt with with his own addictions and what he's learned over the years...Perhaps you might want to search and find the episode, it might help....Basically, his belief is if you want to stop an addiction you need to do the work and find out what in your childhood might be causing the behavior....In other words, don't just think you can focus on the drinking without looking at the possible underlying childhood causes behind it....Though, don't be thinking this is victimization type talk... Not like that at all....

Anyways, I jumped in here to offer support and good luck....You know the right thing to do and I wish you and others with the issue, well.

I recall listening to a podcast just like that a few months back. Maybe it was on Joe Rogans Podcast site.

Yeah, Iím sure there are some underlying issues going on. The only childhood memories I have of my dad are when he was beating the shit out of my mom or being beaten up by the police. Had the swat team at our house many of times throughout my childhood.. I on the other hand always swore that I would never be like him, and I havenít been anything like him accept for the drinking part. He was an angry drunk and I am a happy go lucky pervert drunk. I was functioning and have raised two decent kids so far. I am 44 years old and I want to be in better or same shape in another ten years.

Thanks for the reminder of that podcast. I need to look it up.
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:49 AM
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15 years for me.
I am totally happy with that choice and would never look back.
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:49 AM
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Well hell, I'll jump in on this as well. I had noticed that my drinking was getting excessive. Had been kinda easing towards really restricting myself, and really only drank on Friday or Saturday but most times, I'd be missing the end of the evening and I'd look at the empties and pray it was part of my husband's collection. Low point for me was July 3rd. Woke up on his side of the bed and him asking why I had to sleep there. No clue. It was all gone in my memory. Had been monkeying around with the idea of switching to a ketogenic diet and that made my decision for me. Spent my first 4th of July in 21 years sober as a judge and I had a blast. Had a helluva hangover too. But then I made it through this past weekend, even going out on the boat and coming back and cleaning it. And it's amazing to wake up on Sunday morning with no hangover. I come from alcoholics. I thought because I was just drinking on the weekends, I didn't have a problem. I do. I was functioning but not really. So I'm not drinking a drop for 30 days. Then I'll see where I am. But I know I'm never going back to blackouts. I saw my mom relapse and it scared the shit out of me at age 39. And I don't want to continue the cycle with my kid. OP- You got this. I suggest checking out some of the sparkling waters out there. They have them sugar free, they taste great, they have no artificial shit and it will feel like you are drinking a fancy drink. You got this! I commend everyone else who has gotten sober.
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:57 AM
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Good thing is the body can repair its self. Try some water and a workout routine. Good luck to you
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:58 AM
  #28  
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Quit drinking for 30 days now. I had surgery for broken leg on 6/15, and got hammered on 6/13. Didn't feel like drinking after surgery for some reason. Still don't. Probably because of cast on my leg. Alcohol makes me have energy, and I have to sit around now (no weight allowed on leg). I have been sleeping much better (and more). Eating a bit more probably. Definitely less active. Weight has not changed I don't think.

I know I will start again after I get active, or when I go to biker convention on 8/5. Scheduled for a physical with blood work just before that. Last time I quite was 4 years ago due to illness, and that lasted 6 weeks.
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:05 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by dkknaebel View Post
Well hell, I'll jump in on this as well. I had noticed that my drinking was getting excessive. Had been kinda easing towards really restricting myself, and really only drank on Friday or Saturday but most times, I'd be missing the end of the evening and I'd look at the empties and pray it was part of my husband's collection. Low point for me was July 3rd. Woke up on his side of the bed and him asking why I had to sleep there. No clue. It was all gone in my memory. Had been monkeying around with the idea of switching to a ketogenic diet and that made my decision for me. Spent my first 4th of July in 21 years sober as a judge and I had a blast. Had a helluva hangover too. But then I made it through this past weekend, even going out on the boat and coming back and cleaning it. And it's amazing to wake up on Sunday morning with no hangover. I come from alcoholics. I thought because I was just drinking on the weekends, I didn't have a problem. I do. I was functioning but not really. So I'm not drinking a drop for 30 days. Then I'll see where I am. But I know I'm never going back to blackouts. I saw my mom relapse and it scared the shit out of me at age 39. And I don't want to continue the cycle with my kid. OP- You got this. I suggest checking out some of the sparkling waters out there. They have them sugar free, they taste great, they have no artificial shit and it will feel like you are drinking a fancy drink. You got this! I commend everyone else who has gotten sober.
The coming home after a long boat day and cleaning the boat!!! I would always put it off til the next day. Not anymore. LOL
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:17 AM
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Hats off to you for facing your issues and your fears before they endangered you or killed someone else. I would encourage you to go alcohol free. There are a multitude of reasons to do it and all you need to do is pick one or two as a motivator.
1. Heart health
2. Liver health
3. Mental clarity
4. Weight loss
5. Financial benefit
6. Self respect
7. Respect of others
8. Safety of yourself
9. Safety of others
10. An example to your children/grandchildren

I would choose financial benefit as it is the most tangible immediately. Every time you are tempted to take a drink, put the cost of that drink in a jar. You will be surprised how quickly it adds up. Focus on that savings and set goals for a purchase as a reward for your abstaining. If you slip and take a drink, all the money comes out of the jar and goes to a charity and you have to start over.

Best wishes in your pursuits of sobriety. Don't be afraid to seek help from friends and/or professionals.

You are ahead of the curve as most people drinking at the level you were have to really hit bottom
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:21 AM
  #31  
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Having a crappy childhood has nothing to do with the fact one is an alcoholic or not. What it can do is screw with your head enough that it gives you the "right" to have another drink.

That's all most drunks need. Just a reason, any reason....an excuse to start. And once the alcohol hits the system and the obsession and compulsion starts...then we are off and running. And once that buzz starts, all the other shit we prayed for and promised that we would never do is off the table. Be it drugs, women, gambling, food....

Again, remember no two of us are ever alike when it comes to our addictions....Your experience is just another version of a bad story.
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:22 AM
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I did a 30 day detox a few years ago to see if I could do it. I did and it felt good. BTW I still went to the bars with my buddies but did as suggested and hit the "mocktails".. Good luck too you..

Also - having a kid at 45 will kill your desire to wake up hungover...daddy daddy daddy...
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by humpinit View Post



I recall listening to a podcast just like that a few months back. Maybe it was on Joe Rogans Podcast site.

Yeah, Iím sure there are some underlying issues going on. The only childhood memories I have of my dad are when he was beating the shit out of my mom or being beaten up by the police. Had the swat team at our house many of times throughout my childhood.. I on the other hand always swore that I would never be like him, and I havenít been anything like him accept for the drinking part. He was an angry drunk and I am a happy go lucky pervert drunk. I was functioning and have raised two decent kids so far. I am 44 years old and I want to be in better or same shape in another ten years.

Thanks for the reminder of that podcast. I need to look it up.
I just want to say I think you're a rock star for self assessing yourself....It's not easy to be introspective, and I think that's half the battle....Sounds to me like you already know what might have lead you down this rabbit hole and that's awesome (I do not use that word often)....The beauty of life is you don't have to be one of those people that play the victim to the past or circumstances... You search out the issues to become aware and overcome the negative behavior patterns...As far as I know, we only have one life and you can make tomorrow anything you want....I know one thing for sure, you're kids will respect it....knocking off the drinking, eating healthy, working out is a lifestyle that's enjoyable and easier than most people think....Best of luck to you....
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:42 AM
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I'm on day 25 today myself. I enjoyed drinking IPA's and would average six per day. My blood work would come back in terrible shape.
My tryglyceride's were over 1500. The doctor said I was at high risk for a sudden cardiac episode. The Sunday after a long fishing trip, I drank my last beer. Luckily my girlfriend joined in on this sabbatical. The withdrawals were bizarre. I would actually become very absent minded and spacey without those drinks. That is starting to subside now.
I have been on a couple fishing trips and found the actual fishing part was much more rewarding. I think I am done for good.
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Old 07-11-2018, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by humpinit View Post
I lied and told everyone that I had food poisoning but I am sure it was alcohol poisoning.
And how! You had 50+ drinks in just a couple days. Your liver was crying uncle. Quitting drinking is hard. I have done it and then just gone back to drinking again many times. Seems like every time I quit for a while, when I ultimately start drinking again its less than before. I only drink lite beer now when I drink. I also fake people out with Becks lite non alcoholic when Im in a situation where I know people are going to be drinking a lot more than I want to be drinking. No one ever notices because its in a coozy.
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Old 07-11-2018, 09:27 AM
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In the most respectful way, to those who want to prove a point by abstaining for a month, you are only proving you can stop drinking for a month. Trying to limit or control your drinking suggests you feel it's a problem. Most people who do this will be back to drinking the way they were within a month only this time with a false sense of security. I have a little experience with this and haven't had a drop of alcohol in over nine years.

Best of luck to anyone struggling with their alcohol consumption.
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Old 07-11-2018, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Boat Bum View Post
In the most respectful way, to those who want to prove a point by abstaining for a month, you are only proving you can stop drinking for a month. Trying to limit or control your drinking suggests you feel it's a problem. Most people who do this will be back to drinking the way they were within a month only this time with a false sense of security. I have a little experience with this and haven't had a drop of alcohol in over nine years.

Best of luck to anyone struggling with their alcohol consumption.

Spot on! Dry Drunk Syndrome. Abstaining is good. But the underlying reasons are still there.
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Old 07-11-2018, 10:24 AM
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Glad to see that you have identified your drinking as a problem. I used to put a few back and had more than a handful of rough mornings, but changed all that after I divorced my first wife. My ex thought her level of drinking just suited her fine, but I grew sick and tired of all the crap that went along with her handle of Bacardi, several bottles of wine and 12-pack of beer in a typical week. After 15 years of making excuses for and enabling her drinking, I walked out of the marriage. In the 20 years since, her life has made a serious downward spiral and her health is shot - looks like she's in her 70's not 50's. I have a 2 drink limit, if I am drinking, which keeps me below DUI thresholds and from waking up with regrets. I have no problem being around people that drink all day, I'm just not going to join them in drinking - I found out that I don't necessarily need to keep up with them beer for beer.

Sometimes it doesn't matter if you think you drink too much, it is what others think - you don't have to be around you, they do. If there is a chance that someone close to you has had enough of your drinking and don't care if they walk out of your life, then I guess you don't have a problem. Hang in there!
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Old 07-11-2018, 11:07 AM
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Very good topic, and it's good that you see the issue and sharing. I believe lots of folks find it hard to admit their dependencies (alcohol, tobacco, scripts, food, etc). It's embarrassing, difficult to control at times, and hurts others around us. It makes those with the ut-most integrity look bad at times. And we all want to be seen in a good light. Realizing our problems is the first step. Motivation and planning is not to be underestimated if you want to abstain. Very easy to pick it back up without filling the void with something. When you're ready to quit, take that pissed-off-at-yourself feeling and use it to find things to help cope with urges and triggers (friends, family, work, goals, chores, hobbies, travel, Judo, fishing, etc). Like others have said, it gets easier with time.
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Old 07-11-2018, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Boat Bum View Post
In the most respectful way, to those who want to prove a point by abstaining for a month, you are only proving you can stop drinking for a month. Trying to limit or control your drinking suggests you feel it's a problem. Most people who do this will be back to drinking the way they were within a month only this time with a false sense of security. I have a little experience with this and haven't had a drop of alcohol in over nine years.

Best of luck to anyone struggling with their alcohol consumption.
In the least-defensive way, that's all I was trying to prove with my dry month. I hear your points and agree with them. I was also experimenting to see what the impact would be on weight. I'm sure it was a flawed experiment. I've seen drug addicts and smokers to try abstain and fail miserably, so I thought I'd apply the same challenge to myself with alcohol.

I wound up with a strange realization. I like the taste and "habit" of drinking, and maybe enjoy a buzz just enough to "take the edge off" of a hard day, but I do NOT enjoy being drunk. With my regular routine of drinking, I don't get drunk, but after the abstinence I felt drunk after two.
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