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Ever taught anyone to drive stick?

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Ever taught anyone to drive stick?

Old 06-29-2018, 08:32 PM
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Default Ever taught anyone to drive stick?

I want my kids to at least know how to drive stick. I've never taught anyone before but I recall learning pretty easily. My daughter is 15 now and she has driven some in an automatic. The only stick I have is an 85 mustang gt, which is too much for her. Has anyone used a school to teach this skill? I could pick up a little civic or something but I may not be the best instructor. Any advice?

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Old 06-29-2018, 08:46 PM
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Taught my wife on her Nissan Sentra, new car I drove off the lot when she bought it. I drove a Toyota Celica GTS standard at the time, had her in parking lots for an hour then hit the road. Hill stops were interesting and patience is needed for at least two months. Best of luck. Standard shift is a dying art.
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Old 06-29-2018, 08:47 PM
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How is she going to text, put on make up and shift while driving?
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Old 06-29-2018, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Gsims View Post
I want my kids to at least know how to drive stick. I've never taught anyone before but I recall learning pretty easily. My daughter is 15 now and she has driven some in an automatic. The only stick I have is an 85 mustang gt, which is too much for her. Has anyone used a school to teach this skill? I could pick up a little civic or something but I may not be the best instructor. Any advice?
just teach her on the mustang. Assuming it is stock, it is what, a 200 hp car, the equivalent to a modern civic.
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Old 06-29-2018, 09:03 PM
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I suppose I could on the mustang. It's got plenty of torque. It's just a different experience than a modern car. Low seat, high dash stiff clutch etc. She is a bit intimidated by it.

funny sidebar- neither of my kids had never seen a car with roll up windows before I brought it home.
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Old 06-30-2018, 01:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Gsims View Post
I want my kids to at least know how to drive stick. I've never taught anyone before but I recall learning pretty easily. My daughter is 15 now and she has driven some in an automatic. The only stick I have is an 85 mustang gt, which is too much for her. Has anyone used a school to teach this skill? I could pick up a little civic or something but I may not be the best instructor. Any advice?
My son is 17 and has little interest in driving in general. I have a manual 06 GT that I thought someday he would beg me for it but cars are not his thing.
BTW, my first car was an 85 Mustang GT - white with that black hood sticker! Good times in that thing. Sold it to help pay for my wedding. A week later
the dude who I sold it to wrapped it around a tree at a nearby park.
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Old 06-30-2018, 02:26 AM
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Taught our son when he was 14, his first car was a Miata and even car after that was a Eclispe Spyder GT


Since I own a teen driving school I get folks all time as us about it and how to teach them. Like most best thing is to get them in a vacant parking lot until the get the hang of it . Daughter is 24 and does not know how to drive one as far as I know .


Problem is so few households have manual transmission vehicles anymore, when I was growing up seems like every household had one so easier for them to learn
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Old 06-30-2018, 02:45 AM
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I taught my daughter on the 85 GMC. Not the easiest, but she got it.
a little car would be easy.
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Old 06-30-2018, 02:47 AM
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Just my opinion, but to me a realatively stiff clutch with a very noticeable contact point, coupled to a motor with a decent amount of power, is ideal for teaching. IMO you donít necessarily want to teach with an easy to drive clutch, but rather one that lets you grasp the technique through feel. Most of the Japanese stuff has a very dead clutch peddle feel. Another key advantage to your mustang. Clutches are cheap, especially in regards to labor to replace compared to anything front wheel drive.
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Old 06-30-2018, 03:00 AM
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Be cool to teach them but probably as useful as learning to drive three on the tree when you were young. More useful things to teach would be back a trailer, change a tire and know basics under the hood like fuses, fluids and such. That said use the mustang. If they can learn to drive that a modern car will be easy.

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Old 06-30-2018, 03:01 AM
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Taught my daughter to drive a standard the day after she bought what she could afford on her own, a base level Cobalt - that I drove home for her from the dealership. [Replacing the Civic that I helped buy that got wrecked.] It was winter, so we went out to the biggest empty, ice-covered parking lot in the area to practice. Near-zero traction made it easier for her to get a feel for slipping the clutch and getting moving without being intimidated about stalling. She still talks about that day. Good times!
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Old 06-30-2018, 03:06 AM
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It can be an adventure....

Taught my wife on a '65 Rambler..."3 on the tree"
Oldest daughter...'70 Capri 4-speed
Mid daughter..single axle dump truck
youngest daughter...can't remember

They're all glad to have learned
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Old 06-30-2018, 03:10 AM
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My kids started with 50 cc motorcycles, then 125cc, 250 etc, then 2 strokes, then 4 wheelers, then cars and trucks.
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Old 06-30-2018, 03:29 AM
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Tried to teach my wife in a 80 CJ 7 with a tricky clutch and worn shifter. It didnít go well. She had no real interest in learning but I wanted her to so she played along for about 5 minutes of stalls before she got out and said she was done.

i learned on an 80ís F 250 farm truck but really already had the concept of a clutch down from a Massey tractor. Donít currently have anything with a stick but itís a skill Iím glad to have.

Id let your daughter give it a shot in the stang.
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Old 06-30-2018, 03:41 AM
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Taught my kids on a 90 twin turbo mustang....took a few years off my life & now itís the only thing they want to drive
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Old 06-30-2018, 03:45 AM
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My son got a job as a teen at a dealership washing cars. He learned on their stock
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Old 06-30-2018, 03:49 AM
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If you want a real trick, go to australia an get an opposite side center stick. I promise it will test your skills.
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Old 06-30-2018, 03:58 AM
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When I was buying a replacement commuter car I was specifically looking for a stick so I could teach the kids. They are really getting hard to find anymore. One of my deals for them to be able to drive was to be able to change a tire and drive a stick.

My son was the guinea pig and I had difficulty explaining the concept. Was rough for a bit but he was determined......actually just wanted to be able to without my insistence. He is good with it and often prefers the stick now.

By the time it came to my daughter driving I had listened to a "Car Talk" re-run where someone had asked the best way to teach. Of course the deserted parking lot / road. This was after I had been with her a few times on some dirt roads which are a little more forgiving. Anyway the suggestion was to not touch the gas for the first 10minutes or so and let them get the car moving by just feathering the clutch to let them get the feel of when it starts to engage. This worked pretty well and it didn't take long for her to get it. Now she knows and hasn't really practiced much, but she could get you home if she had to. Would not be a smooth ride though.
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Old 06-30-2018, 04:01 AM
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Why??
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Old 06-30-2018, 04:05 AM
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See the years of all the vehicles mentioned?

Probably not worth teaching and all that comes with it.
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