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Beekeepers "leasing" your land?

Old 06-29-2018, 07:24 AM
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Default Beekeepers "leasing" your land?

Does anyone out there in 'THT" empire have any experiences with allowing beekeepers to put their beehives on their property? We want to have some hives on our property in the country and have sent an email to our local beekeepers association seeing who would be interested. So far we have had two beekeepers show an interest. How do you go about doing this? Is there a financial aspect to it or do the beekeepers pay by giving a portion of the honey? Do you have to worry about the bees taking over your property? What to we need to know? Thanks for any info!
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Old 06-29-2018, 07:28 AM
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In my experience people that want bees on their land actually need them for crop production purposes. My cousin is a large ornamental tree grower. Bees are an absolute necessity in his business. Depending on who has available hives they show up for free, or he pays a modest fee for them. He never has a shortage of honey, but how much can one family eat.
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Old 06-29-2018, 07:31 AM
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I am a bee keeper, people pay us to put hives on their place for the purpose of their crops....of course we share the honey with all of them......just jarred up 19 quarts last night....
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Old 06-29-2018, 07:36 AM
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My sister in law had a couple of hives on her property for a few years. Really other than seeing the stack of boxes, you would not know they were there. They would come and go from the hive to wherever but take no interest in people using the backyard. You never saw more than a few at a time.
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Old 06-29-2018, 07:43 AM
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I used to be over several very large properties. The bee guys would pay a very low rent, like $0.10 per acre for 10,000 or more acres, to put the bees out there for gallberry and tupelo honey. Bears are a nuisance and they would put up fencing or solar hot wire. One guy that was half crazy would sit in the bee yard all night with a shotgun and shoot the bears when they came in.
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Old 06-29-2018, 07:50 AM
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Usually just a share of honey is more than fair. Unless you need them for a commercial ag business. Then be prepared to pay some cash for rental.

You won't even know the hives are there for the most part. I can stand within a few feet of mine and watch their activity and see what kind of pollen they are bringing in. Wear light clothes and a hat if you have dark hair. Don't want to be mistaken for a bear.

Speaking of which, you should definitely consider an electric fence around the hives if bears are present in your area.
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Old 06-29-2018, 08:48 AM
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We don't have any commercial crops. We were actually thinking that having them on the property would allow us to have the zoning changed from residential to agricultural resulting in a much lower property tax assessment. Its good to hear that the bees themselves don't cause any issues.
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Old 06-29-2018, 09:27 AM
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Like bluffman2, my uncle paid to have bees for his orchards. No bees equals no crop.

He had 145 acres of cherries, pears, peaches, and italian plums.
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Old 06-29-2018, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by sea tonic View Post
We don't have any commercial crops. We were actually thinking that having them on the property would allow us to have the zoning changed from residential to agricultural resulting in a much lower property tax assessment. Its good to hear that the bees themselves don't cause any issues.
They do have big trucks that can sometimes rut up the property however.
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Old 06-29-2018, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by bluffman2 View Post
I am a bee keeper, people pay us to put hives on their place for the purpose of their crops....of course we share the honey with all of them......just jarred up 19 quarts last night....
Beekeepers are unsung heros. Congrats!
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Old 06-29-2018, 09:35 AM
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Originally Posted by debugger View Post
They do have big trucks that can sometimes rut up the property however.

we use a fork lift
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Old 06-29-2018, 09:39 AM
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i have 3 small farmers that i keep bees on their land. Two of them have watermelons and cantaloupes and we had agreed on $50 per hive for the pollination services but they are small farmers and i ended up just swapping watermelons/cantaloupes/tomatoes for the pollination services. The other farmer is close and it gives me a place to add to my apiary and he gets the added benefit of having the bees around at no charge to either of us. i'm sure you can find someone around that wants to increase their hives and needs another bee-yard to place hives.
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Old 06-29-2018, 10:07 AM
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Originally Posted by bluffman2 View Post
we use a fork lift
.... And you bring them onsite with a big truck. LOL.

My nephews a second generation commercial beekeeper.

https://www.facebook.com/FloridaRaw/
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Old 06-29-2018, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by debugger View Post
.... And you bring them onsite with a big truck. LOL.

My nephews a second generation commercial beekeeper.

https://www.facebook.com/FloridaRaw/
dodge 1500 quad cab

but your right alot of them use big ole flat beds.......one even has a old army deuce and a half.....talk about ruts
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Old 06-29-2018, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by bluffman2 View Post
dodge 1500 quad cab

but your right alot of them use big ole flat beds.......one even has a old army deuce and a half.....talk about ruts
Oh yeah. He has a couple 5500 flatbeds and one of those loaders that's specific to beekeeping. (It pivots or something special). Also has a semi that goes to Cali for the almond season. You can buy honey from him in a 55 gal drum. He moves a lot of those.
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Old 06-29-2018, 10:22 AM
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Those loaders are nice. Takes most of the back work out of it.
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Old 06-29-2018, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Hayden01 View Post
Those loaders are nice. Takes most of the back work out of it.
He has a couple loaders but one is special. 100k worth of special. Joystick controlled, AC, Lighting. The engine vents in the back are a cutout of a honeybee. It's cool.
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Old 06-29-2018, 10:38 AM
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My grandparents and great uncles have a guy keep hives on their orange groves in exchange for some free orange blossom honey.
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Old 06-29-2018, 10:39 AM
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Neighbor has hives right across the back yard. About 30 yards from where the boat is parked. Haven't bothered me working on the boat at all. I was worried they might get attracted to the gel coat, urethayne, or epoxy while I was working on it. Wouldn't even know they were there. Says he keeps them to introduce pollen to his system to fight severe allergies.
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Old 06-29-2018, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by sea tonic View Post
We don't have any commercial crops. We were actually thinking that having them on the property would allow us to have the zoning changed from residential to agricultural resulting in a much lower property tax assessment. Its good to hear that the bees themselves don't cause any issues.
It's nice if you can get it! I have 24 cows on 41 acres, and my tax is under $200 per year,
But, you're not going to get the AG qualification with a couple of beehives!

You need to read the requiremants of your state/county. These are the "Bee" conditions in Martin county (Stuart) Florida https://www.pa.martin.fl.us/learn-mo...classification
.
  • Beekeeper must be registered with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and provide the Martin County Property Appraiser a copy of their registration.
  • Beekeeper must have all hives inspected annually and provide Martin County Property Appraiser with a copy of inspection certificate.
  • Beekeeper must have their own, or access to, honey extracting equipment and hive building and repair equipment.
  • Beekeeper must provide the Martin County Property Appraiser with a copy of their federal IRS form 1040F or 1040C or other approved document showing business activity in beekeeping.
  • Land classified as agricultural for beeyards would be land area that is used to house bees and produce plants that produce nectar or forage for the bees. Adjacent land areas used by the bees but not owned by the applicant cannot be considered as part of the application. Beeyards would have 24 hives or colonies per acre. A hive being a receptacle that houses a colony of bees or localized population of bees.
  • Leased land can be granted when the following conditions are met. (a) The applicant provides the Martin County Property Appraiser a copy of a bona fide lease, (b) a copy of the beekeepers registration, (c) a copy of the current year's inspection certificate from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services for all hives located on the property of the applicant, (d) location of the beekeepers extraction and hive repair facilities.
They will come out and verify!
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