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-   -   Employment Contract For Construction Superintendent (https://www.thehulltruth.com/dockside-chat/932692-employment-contract-construction-superintendent.html)

humpinit 05-21-2018 08:19 AM

Employment Contract For Construction Superintendent
 
Has anyone ever heard of an employment contract for a superintendent. I have an opportunity to make a move to a new company but I dont want the project to be a one trick pony and then Im looking for work again down the road. I was thinking a five year contract to protect me in case they can not provide work withing a certain distance from my home town.

Mooney6959 05-21-2018 08:27 AM

Florida is a right to work state, so I'm not sure how much a contract could / would help you.
I admit I'm far from the best person to solicit this advice. Though I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night! :thumbsup:

Joey_Tampa 05-21-2018 08:36 AM

Because Florida is a right to work state is exactly why the OP is looking for a contract....

DirtKat 05-21-2018 08:51 AM


Originally Posted by humpinit (Post 11440495)
Has anyone ever heard of an employment contract for a superintendent. I have an opportunity to make a move to a new company but I dont want the project to be a one trick pony and then Im looking for work again down the road. I was thinking a five year contract to protect me in case they can not provide work withing a certain distance from my home town.

Who's protecting them so they get the next job?

Why leave where you are If they have work and you are "protected"?

humpinit 05-21-2018 08:54 AM


Originally Posted by DirtKat (Post 11440628)
Who's protecting them so they get the next job?

Why leave where you are If they have work and you are "protected"?


Its a long sad story that unfortunately I can not discuss online.

For the record, I didnt go looking for employment. They tracked me down.

autobaun70 05-21-2018 08:55 AM

If you can get a contract for a construction super position, it will be so full of contingencies that protect the employer that it will be basically worthless.

That said, if FL is anything like other southern markets, good supers are in demand. If you have the skills, that alone will protect you fairly well. If that is the case, your biggest risk is going to be economic downturn. No contractor is going to tie their hands from being able to make economy based layoffs.

DirtKat 05-21-2018 09:01 AM


Originally Posted by humpinit (Post 11440640)
Its a long sad story that unfortunately I can not discuss online.

For the record, I didnt go looking for employment. They tracked me down.

Sorry to hear. Good luck with whoever you get on with. I've been in the commercial construction industry (sitework/excavation) for 20+ yrs. I don't know anyone around Tx that does employment contracts

Fish Hunter IV 05-21-2018 09:18 AM

As a 20yr vet with one of the world's largest construction companies and one that get's tons of calls from recruiters, I will share one thing I have learned:

The good companies that take good care of their people, do not need recruiters to find employees. There is the occasional exception to that rule but they are few and far between.

I would certainly not entertain a contract position.

Boataholic 05-21-2018 10:23 AM

Contracts work both ways. I wouldn't even think about asking for a contract.

humpinit 05-21-2018 10:26 AM


Originally Posted by Fish Hunter IV (Post 11440736)
As a 20yr vet with one of the world's largest construction companies and one that get's tons of calls from recruiters, I will share one thing I have learned:

The good companies that take good care of their people, do not need recruiters to find employees. There is the occasional exception to that rule but they are few and far between.

I would certainly not entertain a contract position.

I avoid recruiters like the plague. This company actually tracked me down through the local building department.

Lprizman 05-21-2018 10:29 AM

Life is full of risks....your risking not getting this job.
I was a pm on the corporate side...my counter parts for the GC's or me never heard of one.

sharktripper 05-21-2018 10:38 AM

I spent my life working in construction. Among the many things I learned, there’s this, if they don’t have enough work to keep a superintendent busy, they don’t have enough work to keep their doors open. A contract won’t do you any good if they’re no longer in business. The risk is all yours.

Having said that, only you know if the risk is worth taking.

flatbroke2 05-21-2018 10:41 AM

Right to work will have no impact on your contract. But, I do recommend you have a contract. So many people today work without one. You buy a car with one, a home, and even sometimes a boat. Right to work in Florida means: employees' right to bargain collectively through a labor union shall not be denied or abridged. ... The right of persons to work shall not be denied or abridged by membership or non-membership in any labor union or organization. This means you do not have to pay union dues to keep your job. Florida has both “at will” and “right to work” At will means: neither you or your employer has any long term obligations to each other. Just my 2 cents.

bluedart 05-21-2018 10:44 AM

Since they tracked you down you can negotiate anything you want. You may want to add a requirement for severance pay to cover you if the job ends and you are out work.(Above unemployment). Remember the worse they can say is no ( and so can you). 5 years seems high ( I Think more like 2/3) but I have seen some pretty generous employment contracts. Moving expenses, housing allowance, time off etc.

I always like to get any benefits or bonuses upfront rather than on the tail end. In construction and development companies disappear somewhat frequently and are sometimes controlled by individuals who can be volatile.(talented but impulsive) Get pissed off one day, fire you and you have to sue for performance.

Its a contract and has nothing to do with labor law (long as it complies with it).

Ultimately it is the salary that will entice you and you really have to do your due diligence on the company to see how they operate.

Sharpest 05-21-2018 10:46 AM

I'm an assistant superintendent in Texas and I have recruiters beating my door down every week right now. I don't know if my experience/education/age ratio is really that great or if there are just that many available positions to fill but its pretty crazy right now. I am with a badass company that I have no intention of leaving but its still nice to be wanted. I wouldn't stress over a contract even if it was available. With the average turnover rate in this business I wouldn't want to be tied down anyway!

Blythe1022 05-21-2018 11:22 AM

If you think you may end up a one trick pony, that is a reason not to make a move. If you know you will be an asset to the new company you shouldn't worry about it. With the volume of work out there right now people are desperate for help. You are probably better than a few others they may have right now. Rather than asking for a contract you should be asking what type of work this company sees itself going after in the next five years. A lot of it is industry dictated and you never know what jobs you will get. If the work they would like to focus on is moving toward your strengths then you are probably going to be fine. If you are being tapped to bail this job out or it's outside of what this company usually does, you may want to hold off.


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