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Signs of someone new to boating, and pet peeves

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Signs of someone new to boating, and pet peeves

Old 04-28-2018, 05:09 PM
  #21  
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I always drive my boat. Always have. And I ask people if they want to drive. But I do fly a planes.

I always get get caught with fenders out..... but that’s not my job. I’m the captain so five minutes into the harbor I always ask if they are in.... and they never are. I got one ex navy guy who never forgets them though. And he drives all the time too.

My my pet peeve was the minnow bucket. Nothing like seeing someone cruise by with bucket bouncing behind them. I stopped counting how many of those we lost over the years leaving them out when we changed spots.

+1 on the ramp. I love watching the ramp. Thank god my boat is slipped because I would probably be the funniest show around.... driving up to the ramp with my bumpers still hanging out.

We we all live and learn I guess..... some just little faster than others.
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Old 04-28-2018, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by NedLloyd View Post


or “captain”. That one’s even worse.
you forgot to capitalize “Captain”!!
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Old 04-28-2018, 05:38 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by Rhinesel View Post
As a new "boater" , I'm subscribing. Interested in learning the simple "don'ts". Would be need to hear from a dock hand perspective also, what a "boatman" (never heard that term before) does that annoys them.
I've been boating for forty years, grew up on the water, did a short stint in the Navy, attended numerous numerous power squadron and USCG Aux courses over the years, and even took my boat on a navigating exclusively by chart and compass to see if I could do it. Despite all that, I never used the term "boatman".

You never stop learning. Yes I cringe when I see someone say they put their "bumpers" out and tied them with ropes, but I'd rather kindly point out the usual terms, and most folks will listen if you are willing to tell them.
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Old 04-28-2018, 05:52 PM
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I’ve been boating all of my 58 years, had my first boat when I was eight, grew up cruising from the Jersey shore to Nantucket, and up into Lake Champlain & the Canadian boarder. Went to college for commercial fishing, worked in the offshore scalloping industry (100 -150 miles offshore for ten days at a shot) and worked in a shipyard building 40 -95 ft commercial boats.
Up until the “woman’s lib’ movement of the early 70’s, a “boater” was a straw hat, and a “boatman” was someone who enjoyed boating. There were commentaries in the national boating magazines of the day discussing the change from boatman to boater, and was it really necessary, and were “man hole covers” next going to be called “people hole covers”.
Yes,...... the proper term used to be “boatman”.
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Old 04-28-2018, 05:57 PM
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Never heard of the term boatman. I've owned a boat of one kind or another for 40 years and spent 20 years at sea on ships. I have heard the term watermen used for Chesapeake commercial fishermen. Who uses the term?
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Old 04-28-2018, 06:07 PM
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Interesting thread. I've always "operated" a boat, and have heard that's the proper term. I do laugh at the folks who "park at the dock" lol. But that's like me being active duty USAF and using head/latrine interchangeably out of habit.

noob pet peeve #1 of mine is people that block the ramp to fix transom straps and lower bimini, put the cooler in the truck, etc... get your slow dumb ass over to the staging area, sheesh.
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Old 04-28-2018, 06:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Drako View Post
If you want to call yourself a boatman, you'd better be sitting in a wooden boat with a pair of oars, or tending a sail.
Who let the rag baggers in!?
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Old 04-28-2018, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by NedLloyd View Post


or “captain”. That one’s even worse.
My father is a retired captain (master of towing), ran tugboats his whole life. When we go fishing, I make sure to always answer him with "Aye, Captain!".

Old man strength is going to kick in and he's going to kick my ass or throw me overboard any time now.
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Old 04-28-2018, 06:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Buckyss20 View Post
Ned-

Don't get me started............ Boat Ramps.............'nuff said...........If I could spend the money for a high & dry spot somewhere around the Homosassa FL area, and didn't want the flexibility the trailer offers us to take our 20' panga many different places, I would avoid them for the rest of my boating days.

It's like ramps attract stupid. $90k boat, $65k truck, and you can't back it up? Really? Oh, your winch strap broke because it's 10 years old and you're blocking the only ramp with the boat stuck halfway on? Really? Oh, you're co-boater is gonna climb over my boat at the dock while you nearly ram mine to race me to the trucks? Really? So your boat "driver" doesn't know how to negotiate a tidal flow while attempt #4 is made to hit the trailer at 4 knots? Really?

But I wasn't gonna start............
A marina that I used to dock my boat had an open dock right across from the boat ramp, I knew I wanted this dock so I could watch the people. To bad I didn't have a video camera at the time, I could have made hours of footage. Before anyone rips on me I would have been happy to help some of them but I had to drive all the way to the end of the channel, through a gate with a pass card so by the time I would get there whoever would not need my help. I was very surprised that most of the people just smiled and stared at the guy having trouble and didn't offer to help.

I
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Old 04-28-2018, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by N2boats View Post
Along the Chesapeake many are called Watermen.
If the take the Chesapeake to the open sea, are they called seamen?
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Old 04-28-2018, 07:02 PM
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Time to relax. After a few frosty beverages, I don't care what you call things. Right, left, port, starboard, rope, line, anchor, hook...just don't piss or yak in the boat. Hang it over the side/gunnel and don't put the chum/bait in the food cooler.
If we're airboating in the Everglades, don't do nuthin stupid and don't get eaten by a Gator. They usually keep what they bite. Lol.
Now, let's go have a good time. Follow my lead.
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Old 04-29-2018, 04:42 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by NedLloyd View Post
I’ve been boating all of my 58 years, had my first boat when I was eight, grew up cruising from the Jersey shore to Nantucket, and up into Lake Champlain & the Canadian boarder. Went to college for commercial fishing, worked in the offshore scalloping industry (100 -150 miles offshore for ten days at a shot) and worked in a shipyard building 40 -95 ft commercial boats.
Up until the “woman’s lib’ movement of the early 70’s, a “boater” was a straw hat, and a “boatman” was someone who enjoyed boating. There were commentaries in the national boating magazines of the day discussing the change from boatman to boater, and was it really necessary, and were “man hole covers” next going to be called “people hole covers”.
Yes,...... the proper term used to be “boatman”.
Slightly older then you and from New England and don't remember ever hearing the term " Boatman " . While I was always around boats , it was nothing like your experiences .
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Old 04-29-2018, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by NedLloyd View Post
I’ve been boating all of my 58 years, had my first boat when I was eight, grew up cruising from the Jersey shore to Nantucket, and up into Lake Champlain & the Canadian boarder. Went to college for commercial fishing, worked in the offshore scalloping industry (100 -150 miles offshore for ten days at a shot) and worked in a shipyard building 40 -95 ft commercial boats.
Up until the “woman’s lib’ movement of the early 70’s, a “boater” was a straw hat, and a “boatman” was someone who enjoyed boating. There were commentaries in the national boating magazines of the day discussing the change from boatman to boater, and was it really necessary, and were “man hole covers” next going to be called “people hole covers”.
Yes,...... the proper term used to be “boatman”.
I looked up the Wikipedia glossary of nautical terms and boatman is not listed. Scrolled a bit down the list, I believe the term to describe my current status is a corinthian which is defined as amateur yachter. I will concede that one man's yacht may be another man's dingy.

Last edited by BackEastDon; 04-29-2018 at 07:47 AM. Reason: forgot
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Old 04-29-2018, 08:08 AM
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Ive heard of "Boatsman"

Definition of boatsman

plural boatsmen
: one who manages, uses, or works at boats
although not listed in the nautical terms
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Old 04-29-2018, 08:15 AM
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If one woman is motorboating another lady, does that make her a Motorboatman? Motorboater? Motorboatress?
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Old 04-29-2018, 08:22 AM
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two pet peeves.

1. blocking the gas pumps
2. blocking the ramp
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Old 04-29-2018, 08:23 AM
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Gotta agree with the ramp rant. Clowns don’t stage their boats prior to waiting their turn in line and think noting of holding up the ramp to load their shit in the SS Minnow and I’ll forgo comments on their ability to back down the ramp and find water.
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Old 04-29-2018, 09:20 AM
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Must be a northern thing never heard of boatman, seems to me that northerners are much more uptight about boating in general, down south we drink, boat and have a blast all year long.
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Old 04-29-2018, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by N2boats View Post
Along the Chesapeake many are called Watermen.
And it's pronounced wuddermen
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Old 04-29-2018, 10:14 AM
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Perhaps this is why the term boatman is no longer used in nautical circles. Urban Dictionary definition of Boatman
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