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Well water experiences?

Old 03-12-2018, 08:44 AM
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Default Well water experiences?

I figure I'll turn to the THT Brain Trust for some input. Looking into purchasing my first home. I've told my realtor the two utilities i absolutely positively DO NOT want are electric heat (I live in NJ) and well water.

Well we may be having to go back on one of those because we came across some really nice properties with wells.

What are your experiences?

My concerns are:

- Well running dry
- Low water pressure
- Power going out = no water (can be solved with a generator w/ sub-panel)
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:48 AM
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We lived in Florida, so I'm not sure how relevant it is to wherever you're at, but we had 4 wells on property suck sand/silt and basically go dry. The only way my parents solved it was to run to the far end of the property and drill there, they're now 20 years without issue.

The power thing is a real issue, and depends on how far out you are. One thing I'd remind you of though is that when Orlando gets a major power outage, it's not unlikely that we'll be under a boiled water alert and not be able to drink the water anyways. For flushing toilets and bathing, if you have a pool you can likely make due by stealing water from that and going for a swim during hurricane season.
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:54 AM
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I have the best water ever, with power off you have some reserve in the tank that is still under pressure you can use.
Millions of homes in the US have them with no horror stories. You will be fine with a deep well.
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:55 AM
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Wouldn’t trust a well in this world anywhere. Not worried about it running dry either.
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by jj1987 View Post
We lived in Florida, so I'm not sure how relevant it is to wherever you're at, but we had 4 wells on property suck sand/silt and basically go dry. The only way my parents solved it was to run to the far end of the property and drill there, they're now 20 years without issue.

The power thing is a real issue, and depends on how far out you are. One thing I'd remind you of though is that when Orlando gets a major power outage, it's not unlikely that we'll be under a boiled water alert and not be able to drink the water anyways. For flushing toilets and bathing, if you have a pool you can likely make due by stealing water from that and going for a swim during hurricane season.
The running dry thing doesn't seem so common here. I've actually never come across someone needing a well re-drilled here yet. However, like you said, Florida is a little different.

How feasible is it to run a well pump with lets say a 7.5kW generator?
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by magua View Post
Wouldn’t trust a well in this world anywhere. Not worried about it running dry either.
So where do you think municipal water comes from?
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:58 AM
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I live in NH, while I have all public utilities, I know plenty of people with well water. I am not sure what the concern might be (pollution?). But generally speaking it is the best tasting water hands down. Most people I know have it tested about once a year and I have never heard of any problems. In extreme drought, people get stressed about the well going dry, but I have never actually heard of that happening.
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:59 AM
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consider the municipal tap's quality and their infrastructure... pros/cons for both
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:06 AM
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Originally Posted by t84a View Post
So where do you think municipal water comes from?
I’ll take my chances with a constant monitoring 24/7 round the clock. I see pump handles on golf courses welded shut with warning signs.

Your water is more than likely really good.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by HookMeUpII View Post
How feasible is it to run a well pump with lets say a 7.5kW generator?
EASILY. I ran my whole house on a 4kW genset. The important part is to get a genset that does 220/240v, as most pumps use that.

We had a well for 15 years and we also had a well at my parents house. Given a good whole-house filter, the water at both was fine. We added a softener at our house which was a great addition. If you do that, seriously consider a double tank one (our was Kinetco), as you will NEVER run out of softened water because it just toggles between the tanks.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:11 AM
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We had a well in Maryland for 26 years. Water was fine. We had a softener and added a slight bit of chlorine. Water was tested every year and it tasted better than any city water. On city water now in Florida and have to use a chlorine filter for the taste.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:13 AM
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What I really don't understand is folks who only drink bottled water anyways and are still averse to having a well.

You can filter or even reverse-osmosis all the water you need for cooking, and if using R-O it will be purer than any city water in the country!
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:14 AM
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Originally Posted by km1125 View Post
EASILY. I ran my whole house on a 4kW genset. The important part is to get a genset that does 220/240v, as most pumps use that.

We had a well for 15 years and we also had a well at my parents house. Given a good whole-house filter, the water at both was fine. We added a softener at our house which was a great addition. If you do that, seriously consider a double tank one (our was Kinetco), as you will NEVER run out of softened water because it just toggles between the tanks.
If I do purchase a house with a well, I was looking at a diesel portable 5000-7500. I'd rather spend the $1800. Most of them have 220v output.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by km1125 View Post
What I really don't understand is folks who only drink bottled water anyways and are still averse to having a well.

You can filter or even reverse-osmosis all the water you need for cooking, and if using R-O it will be purer than any city water in the country!
That's just really it. I'm not concerned much about purity. I'm just concerned about running dry, no power, well pump breaking, etc. R/O filtration systems can turn any water into the best water on earth.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:30 AM
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First house I bought, 400+ foot deep well through granite - ice cold spring water 24/7!! Some of the best water I ever had! My house in northern MA - brown iron - sulfur laden water - had to put in and maintain a greensand system - after the initial cost, not too bad, maybe $200/year maintenance, but $1500- 2500up front . Have a house near the Severn river in MD, the condition of the plumbing should have been a give away - super acidic water, hard water, and iron!! Not planning on keeping this house too long so went with Culligan - $80/month :-(

SO my point is it all depends on where you are. That first house, that well water was a reason TO BUY that house it was so good!! My neighbors told me stories about when they drilled it, the builder just kept making them go deeper! Must have cost a fortune but it was great!
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by HookMeUpII View Post
The running dry thing doesn't seem so common here. I've actually never come across someone needing a well re-drilled here yet. However, like you said, Florida is a little different.

How feasible is it to run a well pump with lets say a 7.5kW generator?
Going to depend on the HP of the well pump, and what else you want to run. Power requirements of the pump will vary a good bit depending on rated flow, depth of the well, etc.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:35 AM
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Wells are generally not an issue. You should inquire how deep the well is, the newer the house the deeper the well...usually. I grew up in a house with a well, pumps usually aren't a problem, ours lasted 25 years before replacement. Replacement is a pia to pull the pump out but it can be done with 2 abledd bodied men. My dad and I did ours in an afternoon. If power goes out you will have a few gallons in the tank but then you need the genny after that. My parents have a 8kw and it runs the whole house and pump No issues.

I'd be more concerned if there was public sewer, septic tanks and drain fields/sand mounds seem to cause more issues than wells do in my experience.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by HookMeUpII View Post
I figure I'll turn to the THT Brain Trust for some input. Looking into purchasing my first home. I've told my realtor the two utilities i absolutely positively DO NOT want are electric heat (I live in NJ) and well water.

Well we may be having to go back on one of those because we came across some really nice properties with wells.

What are your experiences?

My concerns are:

- Well running dry
- Low water pressure
- Power going out = no water (can be solved with a generator w/ sub-panel)
I am a realtor, and would not agree with your realtor regarding well water.

However, it depends on the area in which you are looking. I have a well, and am in the same general region as you. It has never run dry, my water pressure is pretty good, and the power rarely goes out, so that hasn't been an issue.


I would not discount any properties just because they are on wells. I would be more concerned about if there are contaminants that are common in the well water in the area. When you get the inspections done, get a well water test done and the well inspected. That should assuage any concerns.

Vacant houses are winterized now, but if they aren't, turn on a shower during the showing and see how the pressure is. Also, other things like changing the shower head and removing any water saving apparatuses from the shower heads can help with pressure.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by magua View Post
Wouldn’t trust a well in this world anywhere. Not worried about it running dry either.
Originally Posted by magua View Post
I’ll take my chances with a constant monitoring 24/7 round the clock. I see pump handles on golf courses welded shut with warning signs.

Your water is more than likely really good.
With the water debacle that happened near you, I probably would have the same opinion. And that was supposedly being monitored!
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Boat Hound View Post
With the water debacle that happened near you, I probably would have the same opinion. And that was supposedly being monitored!
No worries here. The water we have here has been rated the best in the country for municipal water. See Consumer Reports.
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