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What a load of crap

Old 02-12-2018, 12:05 PM
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I get tired of reading all the crap people post on this forum. Many posts are so full of crap and are posted by people that are full of crap.

For those of you who like those types of posts, did you know that if you pump your crap into the ground, and then you drink water from a well, eventually you will be drinking your own crap? Well, of course you did (well probably only 73% of you did, the other 27% are screaming "don't tell me where to put my crap").

Apparently our friends in Hawaii didn't know this simple fact. Enjoy the load of crap that I've posted.

From today's Wall Street Journal:

HONOLULU—Paradise has a sewage problem.

Cesspools—holes in the ground where untreated human waste is deposited—have become a crisis in Hawaii, threatening the state’s drinking water, its coral reefs and the famous beaches that are the lifeblood of its tourist economy.

Sewage from cesspools is seeping into some of Hawaii’s ocean waters, where it has been blamed for infections suffered by surfers and snorkelers. It is also entering the drinking water in part of the state, pushing nitrate levels close to the legal limit.

Hawaii has 88,000 cesspools across its eight major islands, more than any other state. Collectively, they deposit 53 million gallons of raw sewage into the ground every day, according to the state health department. More than 90% of the state’s drinking water comes from groundwater wells.

State lawmakers, who outlawed new cesspools in 2016, are scrambling to find a solution to the thousands that exist.

Replacing all of the state’s cesspools with alternate sewage systems would cost at least $1.75 billion, according to the health department.

The problem is concentrated in suburbs and rural areas outside Honolulu, where cesspools have long been the primary method for storing sewage from homes.

Most beaches remain safe for swimming, and public water remains safe to drink for now, state officials said. The tourism industry continues to grow each year, despite instances of contamination at beaches.

But the problem is growing worse, officials said, as the state’s population has continued to grow.

In Upcountry Maui, a rural area in the central part of the island where drinking-water wells are most threatened by cesspools, officials are monitoring water quality closely.

At one groundwater well, nitrate levels are already at 8.7 milligrams a liter; the legal limit is 10, and the Department of Health estimated that some parts of the aquifer are already over that limit. Environmentalists say they are worried about the potential effect of the water on infants, who can be killed by high levels on nitrates, which are chemicals found in fertilizer and sewage.

State Sen. J. Kalani English, who represents Upcountry Maui, said it can cost as much as $100,000 to replace each cesspool, a prohibitive figure for most property owners. There are about 8,000 cesspools in Upcountry Maui alone.

Replacing the cesspools is “a huge financial burden,” he said.

Hawaii’s cesspool problem is a remnant of its agricultural past, when many parts of the state were off the electrical grid. Mr. English said, growing up on Maui, he remembered digging holes for outhouses, and then after a few years filling them with lye and digging new ones.

Outside of Honolulu, the state remains largely rural, and the mountainous terrain makes laying sewer lines to connect to sewage treatment plants expensive and, in many areas, not feasible.

Many bathrooms in homes outside Honolulu still pump sewage into nearby holes in the ground.

Before they were outlawed, the state received about 500 requests to put in new cesspools each year. Last year, the state passed a law requiring all cesspools to be replaced by 2050.

Yet, some residents resist plans to replace cesspools, worried about expense. In January, Upcountry Maui residents overwhelmed a Department of Public Health meeting, complaining about potential costs.

“You may want a clean environment, but you can’t afford to pay for it,” said Keith Kawaoka, deputy director for environmental health at the state agency. “It’s a real dilemma.”

Lawmakers are still searching for solutions. They recently called on engineers to bring them new ideas, adding that simply converting to septic systems—in which solids and liquids of waste are separated and the solids are later pumped out—wouldn’t solve the contamination problems in some areas, because nitrates would still seep into the groundwater.

Health officials said the 740 cesspools around Kahaluu, on the east coast of Oahu, contributed to high bacteria counts in the bay.

“Skin infections consistent with sewage-contaminated surface waters have been documented in this area,” the department’s report said.

Officials said it is difficult to definitively prove that any specific infection resulted from sewage contamination.

In Puako, a popular snorkeling destination on the Big Island, residents fear that sewage from the area’s 150 cesspools has already harmed the coral reef, which is its signature tourist attraction.

Peter Hackstedde, president of Puako Community Association, said he now avoids the water if he has a cut; he has gotten infected before.

He said the community had already spent more than $2.5 million of its own money studying the problem.

“We found that sewage is leaking into the ocean, and we swim in it,” Mr. Hackstedde said.

They now hope to install a small-scale sewage-treatment plant, which would avoid having to dig and install pipes to the nearest town, about 50 miles away.

A treatment plant would cost about $15 million, Mr. Hackstedde said, and residents don’t want to put up that money on their own. He said his association is hoping for a public-private partnership.

“Everyone who lives down here is pretty much for cleaning up the ocean,” Mr. Hackstedde said. “We just need the money.”
Old 02-12-2018, 12:13 PM
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I only ready the first sentence of your post, it seemed pointless to go any further. Let me clue you in to a forum works. YOU CHOOSE what you want to read. Peace out.
Old 02-12-2018, 12:25 PM
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That is a bunch of crap!
Old 02-12-2018, 01:14 PM
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Oh SHIT!
Old 02-12-2018, 01:23 PM
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That's why the Hawaiian state fish is the humuhumunukunukuapua'a. Translated, it means "little turd eater."
Old 02-12-2018, 01:27 PM
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When our resident ATC posted about moving to atoll I wondered what they did with all their chit if they move all their trash off the side of the island.....
Old 02-12-2018, 01:27 PM
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Are they talking about septic tanks?

A cesspool is an open air shit pit.

They are two different things.
Old 02-12-2018, 01:28 PM
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Why don’t they call sewage cess?
Old 02-12-2018, 01:29 PM
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Doody, doody
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Old 02-12-2018, 01:48 PM
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They don't have any sewage treatment plants? ;? That certainly changes my view of Hawaii.

We had a septic system for 20+ years but it didn't have the typical leach field. A pipe came out of the septic tank and went 500+ feet north into the farm field behind the house. Then there was an intersecting pipe that went east and west and ended up going into a pond. I guess it wasn't against the law when this was originally done. We were always more worried about the chemicals put on the farm field and the farmer would spray liquid pig waste and not turn it over or bury it. I finally got the health department involved that made him stop spraying the vile stuff...worst smell ever.

We started buying bottled water for drinking since we moved in because we were paranoid about what was in the ground water. Our well is only 40' deep, that isn't far enough from the surface for me.
Old 02-12-2018, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by YFMF View Post
Oh SHIT!
amazing the language you can use in dockside now. ive been banned for far less
Old 02-12-2018, 04:01 PM
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Aerobic systems can be put in for around $15,000. Not $100,000 each. Split the cost between individual nd state, affordable.
Old 02-12-2018, 04:22 PM
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oh the price they pay to live in paradise
Old 02-12-2018, 04:24 PM
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[QUOTE=ol guide;11118782]amazing the language you can use in dockside now. ive been banned for far less[/QUOTE


Yep! Lot of perma banned folks would still be here with the newest standards that are more realistic.
Old 02-12-2018, 04:35 PM
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that stinks
Old 02-12-2018, 04:42 PM
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Describes tht on bad days
Old 02-12-2018, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by SEATOAD View Post
Are they talking about septic tanks?

A cesspool is an open air shit pit.

They are two different things.
This.... and if it costs $100,000 to replace one? ........ I’m buying a backhoe!!!!
Old 02-12-2018, 05:08 PM
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Oh but you don’t have to pay. This article shows that they have not been paying, or more explicitly, that their local gubernmunts have been spending the tax money on other things, not so fundamental.
Like buying votes and not telling the truth of needing to build treatment plants.

Do you really believe the governments in Hawii will tell the whole truth about beach and water contamination?
Old 02-12-2018, 05:22 PM
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Actually, most Hawaiians don't really give a s**t about stuff like that......
Old 02-12-2018, 05:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Dulcecita Lures View Post
That's why the Hawaiian state fish is the humuhumunukunukuapua'a. Translated, it means "little turd eater."
That's Shit is funny!!!!

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