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Quick havc question...

Old 12-15-2017, 05:41 PM
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Default Quick havc question...

I an in a new house. Every other new one I built myself. This one has a Trane HVAC system. Have the heat on, the compressor outside is coming on.

Is that right? Heat pump? No manuals with the house.

Thanks!
Old 12-15-2017, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by skibum View Post
I an in a new house. Every other new one I built myself. This one has a Trane HVAC system. Have the heat on, the compressor outside is coming on.

Is that right? Heat pump? No manuals with the house.

Thanks!
Yep - heat pump.
Old 12-15-2017, 05:55 PM
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Sounds like your new to heat pumps . . .

When it goes into defrost mode (while set for heating in colder temps outside coil will ice up) the reversing valve will reverse flow of refrigerant and you may here some strange noises.

I would describe it is a big "whoosh" sound.

Don't panic, it's normal.
Old 12-15-2017, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by wdemo View Post
Yep - heat pump.
Thank you!

That's good, right?
Old 12-15-2017, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by skibum View Post
Thank you!

That's good, right?
in moderate climates yes

in very cold climates, not so much
Old 12-15-2017, 06:29 PM
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Heat pumps work Ok until you get down to the 20s or so - then, the amount of warmth provided is pretty lackluster.
Old 12-15-2017, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by skibum View Post
Thank you!

That's good, right?
maybe. The colder it gets, the less efficient a heat pump is.
Old 12-15-2017, 07:01 PM
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I'll "splains" it to ya when I see ya..............
Old 12-15-2017, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
I'll "splains" it to ya when I see ya..............

Gracious! I'm new to heat pumps, obviously! This is our Texas house, new, but haven't been here much. Appreciate the help.

And happy that billinstuart has decided to leave the ship!
Old 12-15-2017, 07:47 PM
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take the model # and google for manual
Old 12-15-2017, 09:04 PM
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Originally Posted by trivialpursuits View Post
Heat pumps work Ok until you get down to the 20s or so - then, the amount of warmth provided is pretty lackluster.
In low temps a heat pump works great. It goes in to straight electric mode and your electric meter starts looking like the national debt clock.
Old 12-16-2017, 05:49 AM
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Properly operating heat pumps work just fine in moderate climates. They are very popular in NC but popularity fades fast as you go north from here. I've had the same hp for 26 yrs in my house. A few times over the yrs we have gotten down into the teens. I have never woken up to a house that was cooler than the set point on the thermostat (70 in winter).

I'll use a 3 ton hp as an example. Year round when it comes on, it provides about 36,000 btu's of cooling or heating. 36,000 is enough for most winter days...until it isn't. That's when the thermostat will automatically cycle on the electric heat strips, as needed, to aid the hp portion of the system. Your elec meter will spin like crazy when this happens on cold days and nights. Luckily the backup heat strips aren't needed every day so your average energy bill for the yr is lower (in the same suitable climate) when you have a hp vs. a gas heater with ac. Typically. The use of 90% + hi eff furnaces has closed that gap.

If you like to jack around the thermostat you are better off with gas heat. If you are a calm, non ADD person who can set it to heat on A SPECIFIC temperature and leave it til spring, then a hp is ok for you.

I forgot to explain why the hp keeps up on cold days/nights. 3 ton hp's typically have a 10kw heat kit installed in the air handler. When this aux heat is turned on by the thermostat the heat output is almost doubled. 10,000 watts = 34,000 additional btu's. So now you have 70,000 btu's on demand and just 36,000 btu's most of the time.

Heat pumps run time is longer, that's normal.
Old 12-16-2017, 06:11 AM
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And with heat pump the air coming out of the vents isn't "warm" like the heating systems of old
Old 12-16-2017, 06:13 AM
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Originally Posted by baypro21 View Post
Properly operating heat pumps work just fine in moderate climates. They are very popular in NC but popularity fades fast as you go north from here. I've had the same hp for 26 yrs in my house. A few times over the yrs we have gotten down into the teens. I have never woken up to a house that was cooler than the set point on the thermostat (70 in winter).

I'll use a 3 ton hp as an example. Year round when it comes on, it provides about 36,000 btu's of cooling or heating. 36,000 is enough for most winter days...until it isn't. That's when the thermostat will automatically cycle on the electric heat strips, as needed, to aid the hp portion of the system. Your elec meter will spin like crazy when this happens on cold days and nights. Luckily the backup heat strips aren't needed every day so your average energy bill for the yr is lower (in the same suitable climate) when you have a hp vs. a gas heater with ac. Typically. The use of 90% + hi eff furnaces has closed that gap.

If you like to jack around the thermostat you are better off with gas heat. If you are a calm, non ADD person who can set it to heat on A SPECIFIC temperature and leave it til spring, then a hp is ok for you.

I forgot to explain why the hp keeps up on cold days/nights. 3 ton hp's typically have a 10kw heat kit installed in the air handler. When this aux heat is turned on by the thermostat the heat output is almost doubled. 10,000 watts = 34,000 additional btu's. So now you have 70,000 btu's on demand and just 36,000 btu's most of the time.

Heat pumps run time is longer, that's normal.
Mike are heat pumps generally used on the second story? I have a hp upstairs and a gas furnace downstairs (I think...). In planning to install a 120 volt plug to power the fan on my gas furnace so I can keep the heat flowing if power goes out. How does the thermostat get power?
Old 12-16-2017, 06:39 AM
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Thanks for all the additional info!

This is a house in Denton, Texas. We really don't spend much time here - I may have slept here 20 times since we bought it in May. Here for two weeks for family Christmas, I'll let the meter spin while here, as I managed to get a pretty bad cold/green mucus attack being back in "cold" weather.

The air coming out does feel warm. Guessing the heat strips are on!

Again, thanks all for contributing.

Kent
Old 12-16-2017, 06:47 AM
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One great addition to any heat pump is a thermostat that has an outside air sensor. With it you can lock out the outside unit when temps drop below its effective operating temp, which varries slightly depending on the refrigerant used and design of the unit.

Also, most thermostats will trigger the heat strips when there is a 3 degree differential between the set point and sensed temp. You can avoid them coming on by keeping temp increases to 2 degree increments. Some of the smart thermostats will also not turn them on when “recovering” from a low hold setting or making jumps that are programmed in the schedule.
Old 12-16-2017, 06:51 AM
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If outside unit locks out you're heating with strips only correct?
Old 12-16-2017, 06:55 AM
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Thirty years in north Texas with a brother in the hvac business I would say no to heat pump if you were going to be there year round. While they do many things well, at the temp extremes, not so much. Trust me when I say it can be 50 one day and 10 the next the winter. If you have a pool make sure you have a freeze guard that works, cover the outdoor water taps with a freeze sleeve and enjoy.
Old 12-16-2017, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by cfarmd View Post
If outside unit locks out you're heating with strips only correct?
Correct. Once you drop below a certain temp (varies based on the system) it is pointless to run the outside unit. It will run and burn power all day long, but isn’t accomplishing anything.
Old 12-16-2017, 07:21 AM
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Ground water source heat pumps are the bomb! ALWAYS provide decent heat because the source of energy is constant and plentiful.

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