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Atlantic salmon in the Pacific

Old 09-04-2017, 06:32 AM
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Default Atlantic salmon in the Pacific

Nice... real nice...

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/...tcmp=obnetwork
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Old 09-04-2017, 06:42 AM
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I don't understand why anyone believes a non-native species can be brought into a new environment and contained. Didn't work with Asian carp in fish ponds along the Mississippi, now it didn't work with Atlantic salmon in the Pacific Ocean. When the inevitable escape happens, the perp whines "Oh, we had such unusual conditions! We were helpless to stop it! Don't blame us!" The only unusual condition was the one they created, so, yes, blame the dang fish farmers!

If the regulatory people we pay to protect our fisheries had a lick of sense they would never have allowed either fiasco to get started. OTOH, hundreds of thousands of Atlantic salmon have escaped from commercial fish farms in Washington since 1991 and there is still no detectable reproducing population in the Pacific.

I do like that the State of Washington is begging recreational fishermen to catch as many of these Atlantic salmon as they can, no catch limits. I'm sure that will do the trick.
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Old 09-04-2017, 10:53 AM
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This will probably be worse than the lionfish invasion of the Lower East Coast!
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Old 09-04-2017, 12:33 PM
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Maybe they will move. After all hurricane predictions are more reliable than the tides.

http://www.wral.com/coastal-lawmaker...n-nc/16721828/
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Old 09-04-2017, 12:55 PM
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Atlantics have been raised in Wash and Bc since the early 80's. What evidence does anyone actually have of the"harm" they have done. Sounds like there are just more extra fish to catch. All fish spread parasites, as do birds like Herons.
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Old 09-04-2017, 09:05 PM
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Originally Posted by yarcraft91 View Post
I don't understand why anyone believes a non-native species can be brought into a new environment and contained. Didn't work with Asian carp in fish ponds along the Mississippi, now it didn't work with Atlantic salmon in the Pacific Ocean. When the inevitable escape happens, the perp whines "Oh, we had such unusual conditions! We were helpless to stop it! Don't blame us!" The only unusual condition was the one they created, so, yes, blame the dang fish farmers!

If the regulatory people we pay to protect our fisheries had a lick of sense they would never have allowed either fiasco to get started. OTOH, hundreds of thousands of Atlantic salmon have escaped from commercial fish farms in Washington since 1991 and there is still no detectable reproducing population in the Pacific.

I do like that the State of Washington is begging recreational fishermen to catch as many of these Atlantic salmon as they can, no catch limits. I'm sure that will do the trick.
Some of the first shipments of king salmon eggs destined for the great lakes came from my hatchery in Oregon. Guess that worked out ok.
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Old 09-05-2017, 04:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Bullshipper View Post
Atlantics have been raised in Wash and Bc since the early 80's. What evidence does anyone actually have of the"harm" they have done. Sounds like there are just more extra fish to catch. All fish spread parasites, as do birds like Herons.
You sure about that? Watch the video linked below. It's over an hour long but to suggest the practice is benign is a stretch.

https://vimeo.com/61301410
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Old 09-05-2017, 04:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Bullshipper View Post
Some of the first shipments of king salmon eggs destined for the great lakes came from my hatchery in Oregon. Guess that worked out ok.


One of the few success stories involving a species intentionally introduced by man, but that was because the unintentional introduction of the alewife had already destroyed the native ecosystem. Not the case with the Pacific NW.
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Old 09-05-2017, 05:39 AM
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When they opened the St. Lawrence seaway, many years ago ,and let the invasive Chad into
Lake Michigan. Course they let in Smelt ,and Coho salmon so yeah, that's what they refer to as unintended consequences!
All the best!
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They tell me lionfish eat good.
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Old 09-05-2017, 06:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Bullshipper View Post
Some of the first shipments of king salmon eggs destined for the great lakes came from my hatchery in Oregon. Guess that worked out ok.
It worked out great for many years, so thanks for the eggs! The salmon did such a good job of eating the invasive alewives that the salmon plants had to be reduced to avoid starved chinooks. Great Lakes salmon fishing is a mere wisp of what it was 40 years ago.
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Old 09-05-2017, 07:59 AM
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Since I owned the largest king and coho hatchery in the 70's and early 80's I think I am farely well informed on this subject as my clients also brought in atlantics for pen rearing instead of release and recapture which was my market.
These stories are generated by comercial fishing marketers trying to give non wild fish a bad name, but a high percentage of the salmon from Chile, Scandanavia and southern Bc are farmed fish as wild stocks continue to fail even with gov hatcheries pumping out smolts.
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Old 09-05-2017, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Bullshipper View Post
Since I owned the largest king and coho hatchery in the 70's and early 80's I think I am farely well informed on this subject as my clients also brought in atlantics for pen rearing instead of release and recapture which was my market.
These stories are generated by comercial fishing marketers trying to give non wild fish a bad name, but a high percentage of the salmon from Chile, Scandanavia and southern Bc are farmed fish as wild stocks continue to fail even with gov hatcheries pumping out smolts.

So you have no concern your hatchery frankenfish are gonna get on the gravel with wild genetics?


Wow.

Hatchery fish suck. Fix the instream habitat and keep your fake fish out of the river.
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Old 09-05-2017, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by bayrunner16 View Post
So you have no concern your hatchery frankenfish are gonna get on the gravel with wild genetics?


Wow.

Hatchery fish suck. Fix the instream habitat and keep your fake fish out of the river.
Typical uniformed reaction.

We released all our fish to the ocean as smolts in a bay. We also marked our fish to assure that we could detect unwanted migrations into rivers by precocious jacks.

Once they returned to us we selected the best examples to maintain a strong gene pool, sepetate from river fish that were severely declining prior to our arrival. Private industry was releasing around 10 m smolts a year at no cost to the public.
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Old 09-05-2017, 11:15 AM
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What about the 10,000 Cobia that escaped last year off Cabo? Has anyone caught those on hook and line in California or anywhere?
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Old 09-05-2017, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Bullshipper View Post
Typical uniformed reaction.

We released all our fish to the ocean as smolts in a bay. We also marked our fish to assure that we could detect unwanted migrations into rivers by precocious jacks.

Once they returned to us we selected the best examples to maintain a strong gene pool, sepetate from river fish that were severely declining prior to our arrival. Private industry was releasing around 10 m smolts a year at no cost to the public.

So you marked them. How does that stop frankenfish from straying or even how do you know you got them all as returns? What year class did they return? How did you know what year they would return? You cant be serious. We havent had a hatchery on the Eel River since about 97, yet catch clipped strays every year. Where are they coming from? How do you know your frankenfish didnt stray. You dont.

They returned and you selected the best returns? Do tell, how on earth do you look at a salmon and determine this?

Sorry. Im not unimformed. I live on the banks of the Eel River. Once the king of salmon rivers in the continental usa. Im involved in inriver counts, net counts, hatchery/brood stock counts on another river, on the board of directors for another salmon/steelhead organization.

Private industry wasnt releasing 10 million smolts a year at no cost. It was paid for in jacked up rates after they were required to release for mitigation after bonneville construction. I guess you think they just pay for the squawfish program out of the goodness of their hearts also?

You are ruining wild genetics. Fuck the bandaid hatcheries, fix the inriver habitat and flows.
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Old 09-05-2017, 05:16 PM
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Hard to answer you at length on my iphone, but ocean ranching was not sposored by the power companies. Seperate deal entirely where hatcheries put back fish destroy by power facilities. Somehow some folks still think electric power has its role to play too and the Columbia does genetate its fair share with no carbom foot promt.

My clients were companies like British Petroleum, Dupont, and Weyerhaeuser and my hatchery was 25,000 gpm well water faciliy that drained to a gravel pit. Release stations were in Coos Bay, Newport and at the mouth of the Columbia, and as I said before were all saltwater, privately funded for profit ventures.
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Old 09-06-2017, 04:07 AM
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I don't think the Atlantic Salmon will be a threat.
Great swimmers, they will find there way back to the Atlantic.

Quite the global world we have now, no one can accurately predict the future.
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