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Question for electricians

Old 08-30-2017, 06:02 PM
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I want to install a NEMA 14-50 outlet in my garage. My plan is to do the drywall work and run the wires, then pay a licensed electrician to come do the final connection. I have a few questions:

(1) Is there any minimum distance that the new outlet must be from the panel? My thought was that I could avoid having to run wires through studs if I put the new box directly below the panel. The wall is full of foam insulation, so I figured I’d just put the outlet about 6” below the panel.

(2) Is there any reason why I can not use a standard, blue plastic, double gang, “new work” box for a 14-50 receptacle?

(3) Notice that on the picture of my panel, all the wires go into conduits. Can I just put standard 3/4” knockouts on the panel box and the double gang box and then run NM-B 6-3 cable w/ground “naked” in the wall?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 08-30-2017, 06:21 PM
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1- No there is no minimum limit that will work.
2- that's the best option and is up to code in a residential house. They do have other boxes at Home Depot that will fit that.
3- going into the panel u want to make sure u have a romex Conector with lock ring.
Old 08-30-2017, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by TTB View Post
I want to install a NEMA 14-50 outlet in my garage. My plan is to do the drywall work and run the wires, then pay a licensed electrician to come do the final connection. I have a few questions:

(1) Is there any minimum distance that the new outlet must be from the panel? My thought was that I could avoid having to run wires through studs if I put the new box directly below the panel. The wall is full of foam insulation, so I figured I’d just put the outlet about 6” below the panel.

(2) Is there any reason why I can not use a standard, blue plastic, double gang, “new work” box for a 14-50 receptacle?

(3) Notice that on the picture of my panel, all the wires go into conduits. Can I just put standard 3/4” knockouts on the panel box and the double gang box and then run NM-B 6-3 cable w/ground “naked” in the wall?

Thanks in advance.
You can install the box wherever you want no problem there unless that panel is installed in a hazardous location which would require to keep it above 24" or the use of seal off/ explosion proof fittings depending of the classification of such hazardous location will be required. If this is in your house you shouldn't have these issues. I would use a regular 1900 deep box (4" x 4" x 2 1/8" ) and a piece of 3/4" EMT if you willing to cut the drywall or a cutting box with AL flex if you don't want to and use that open knockout that you have there on the bottom right corner, then pull the #6 "hot wires" and a # 10 ground. Just buy the wires cuts at the length that you need at HD. I always prefer conduits vs Romex, MC etc in that you can always rewire if necessary.
Old 08-30-2017, 07:08 PM
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Good chance that romex is not in conduit.
if conduit is used they run single wires
Old 08-30-2017, 08:13 PM
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You can fish the wire in the wall without securing it and a piece of #6/3 w-g will work fine with the right clamps. Get an old work box with 3/4" K/Os and go for it.
There may be some trial and error getting the length right so you can get the lock nut on after you set the box and tighten the wings..
Old 08-31-2017, 03:01 AM
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Voltage drop is figured starting at 100 feet
Old 08-31-2017, 03:05 AM
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cut the sheetrock two inches outside the two studs that hold the main panel
in, chop a path into the foam and pipe from the panel to the two gang box for the outlet. Run the wire or pipe and then put back regular insulation. Patch the rock and your on ya way..
If you have an issue with securing the wire or pipe within code install a 2x4 from stud to stud horizontally and your all set.
Old 08-31-2017, 03:07 AM
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That will be $500 please, lol...
Old 08-31-2017, 03:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Garett View Post
x2

....but #3, you don't need to run the wire in the wall to a box that is six inches away from the panel. You can go from the knock out to your box via 14/s or 14/3 if you want to make it a split outlet/ breaker, but the wire must be stapled even it the distance between the panel and the box is six inches. As long as your romex is backed by the drywall/ plywood backer board from the main service panel to your outlest it can be run on the surface of that substraight. If you bridge from that surface to open space then you best use BX cable from the main to your box.....but code does not dictate that....it gets complicated for me to cover all your options.
You have no idea what your talking about lol...you still run BX? lol.... If the cheep price is what you desire dont be surprised when your house catches fire...lol...
Old 08-31-2017, 03:14 AM
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TTB I'm an electrical inspector in SE PA. To answer your questions. You can attach the receptacle directly to your panel if you wish. Depending on the location of your panel it may have to be either Arc Fault or GFCI. Any new work wall case that fits the receptacle will work. Plastic is easier because of the box grounding issue. The wires in your panel now don't look like they enter via conduit. They are Romex entering with a plastic push type Romex connector.
Old 08-31-2017, 03:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Chipshot View Post
TTB I'm an electrical inspector in SE PA. To answer your questions. You can attach the receptacle directly to your panel if you wish. Depending on the location of your panel it may have to be either Arc Fault or GFCI. Any new work wall case that fits the receptacle will work. Plastic is easier because of the box grounding issue. The wires in your panel now don't look like they enter via conduit. They are Romex entering with a plastic push type Romex connector.
Thank god, please read some of these posts....o ya welcome
Old 08-31-2017, 06:49 AM
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Thanks guys!

TJ
Old 08-31-2017, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Chipshot View Post
TTB I'm an electrical inspector in SE PA. To answer your questions. You can attach the receptacle directly to your panel if you wish. Depending on the location of your panel it may have to be either Arc Fault or GFCI. Any new work wall case that fits the receptacle will work. Plastic is easier because of the box grounding issue. The wires in your panel now don't look like they enter via conduit. They are Romex entering with a plastic push type Romex connector.
Old 08-31-2017, 09:37 AM
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Just to add that Romex should not be run in conduit. Typically Romex insulation is geared toward open air installs. Putting it in a pipe derates the ampacity of the conductor. I'd get some proper sized stranded conductors cut at HD and utilize jogs or offsets to plumb to the box which I assume is to be flush mounted.
Old 09-06-2017, 01:28 PM
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The plot thickens.

Attached is a photo of the panel. As you can see I used a drywall knife to cut a hole for a double gang box just below the panel. It turns out there is wood behind the drywall. Presumably the wood is there specifically so idiots like me don't put a drywall knife through a piece of live romex. I tried to use a stud finder to determine where there is wood and where there is not, but I've not really be able to definitively determine anything.

Are there any words of wisdom from my THT brethren that might help me figure out where I can put the new outlet without me turning the whole wall into drywall swiss cheese?

Thanks
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Old 09-06-2017, 01:46 PM
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Go left 4 inches
Old 09-06-2017, 02:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Alureing View Post
That will be $500 please, lol...
That's the rate of a H.I. Express J.D.
Old 09-06-2017, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by TTB View Post
The plot thickens.

Attached is a photo of the panel. As you can see I used a drywall knife to cut a hole for a double gang box just below the panel. It turns out there is wood behind the drywall. Presumably the wood is there specifically so idiots like me don't put a drywall knife through a piece of live romex. I tried to use a stud finder to determine where there is wood and where there is not, but I've not really be able to definitively determine anything.

Are there any words of wisdom from my THT brethren that might help me figure out where I can put the new outlet without me turning the whole wall into drywall swiss cheese?

Thanks
You already have a hole to patch, just make it bigger and find out what they did.
never heard of adding wood to keep people from cutting wires, but that dont mean they do not do that.

stud finders do not work well aroung electrical wiring, it jacks with the signals.

I have used small strong magnets to find the nails/screws they used on the sheetrock to tell me where the studs are
Old 09-06-2017, 04:58 PM
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Might be able to pop out a knockout in the panel box a little to the left to see if you have a clear area to mount your box
Old 09-07-2017, 11:10 AM
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Ugh!
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