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When will Fema dictate elevated homes in certain low area?

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When will Fema dictate elevated homes in certain low area?

Old 08-29-2017, 07:08 AM
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Default When will Fema dictate elevated homes in certain low area?

Seriously why can't the gub insist they can't keep bailing people out in low lying areas? Are there codes in place for when rebuilding to rebuild higher? I think that was the case in Long Island from Sandy right? Is there something I am missing or are they already insisting elevated homes in rebuilding on same spots where flooding occurs?
Old 08-29-2017, 07:12 AM
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Better yet, abondon houses that continually get flooded or simply refuse to insure houses in certain areas.
Heard one report about a house that has flooded 16 times in 18 years.
Old 08-29-2017, 07:21 AM
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Flood plain silliness...

My army buddies childhood area of St. Louis is in the flood plain of Mississippi, back midninties this whole place flooded, sure enough 20yrs later all rebuilt like flooding never happens here?

I'm all for people building what they want on their lands, but gov paying to rebuild personal loses when nature is prone to destruction by weather is unnatural thus unselfish-sustainable...
Old 08-29-2017, 07:31 AM
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Originally Posted by kennyboy View Post
Seriously why can't the gub insist they can't keep bailing people out in low lying areas? Are there codes in place for when rebuilding to rebuild higher? I think that was the case in Long Island from Sandy right? Is there something I am missing or are they already insisting elevated homes in rebuilding on same spots where flooding occurs?
Older homes are grand fathered in but if you rebuild in a flood zone or raise your house you have to go above the 100 year flood mark. Not sure the government is bailing out if people have flood policies at exorbitant amounts with a max pay out of i think 200K. They will just redo the flood maps and spread the loses.
Old 08-29-2017, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by bikem View Post
Older homes are grand fathered in but if you rebuild in a flood zone or raise your house you have to go above the 100 year flood mark.
Only if you buy flood insurance.
Old 08-29-2017, 07:56 AM
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They do, its called flood elevation maps and repetitive loss penalties. Mortgage industry is also to blame so don't look for much change until biggert-waters is fully implemented. Look for the number of properties burning down to be at all time highs when it does.
Old 08-29-2017, 07:59 AM
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FEMA doesn't make those type of regulations. Those are set and enforced by local governments.
Old 08-29-2017, 07:59 AM
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Lets add in all the homes on the beach. Where does the money for beach renurishment come from
Old 08-29-2017, 08:08 AM
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Originally Posted by saltyreefer View Post
Lets add in all the homes on the beach. Where does the money for beach renurishment come from
I could break down the economic benefits of beach renourishment, but I have a feeling it will fall on deaf ears so I won't bother.
Old 08-29-2017, 08:09 AM
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When we had Hurricane Floyd come through Eastern NC, FEMA offered buyouts to flooded homeowners.

One stipulation, you could not rebuild in the flood zone. It was complicated, took city buy in, time and effort, but a lot of the floodplains around here are free of houses.

Of course there are small areas that did not participate and just wanted free money. (Perhaps you have heard of Princeville NC) These areas were flooded again during Matthew.

Really hard to feel sorry for people that continuously get flooded out and refuse to move.
Old 08-29-2017, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by saltyreefer View Post
Lets add in all the homes on the beach. Where does the money for beach renurishment come from
Actually used to be like you, but with how much we have altered the coast, hard to say.

Once we started digging harbors, waterways, channels, the ICW jetties etc., the balance has was changed, so we might as well put the sand back.
Old 08-29-2017, 08:27 AM
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We built in 2006 and raised up well over flood height. Then I see some other houses in the same area leveled and a new structure put up at ground level. I am baffled by this. How do they get away with it? We improved and did what we thought we had to. At least we are flood proof I guess.
Old 08-29-2017, 08:42 AM
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Hmmm, I don't know how it works in other places, but in Louisiana, I have lost two houses to hurricanes.

First one, I was allowed to rebuild (repair) only the existing portion, and could not get electricity or water hooked up until it was certified to meet standards. If the whole house was demolished, then I had to rebuild at FEMA flood maps heights minimums. If I added anything on, it had to be at FEMA elevation requirements.

Second one, house was washed completely away. I could only rebuild meeting the FEMA elevation requirements, originally 9' then raised to 12' in my area. I actually went to 22', I did not want to go thru all that again, the house is the highest on the street, by far.

Most of the "rebuilding" is where the repetitive losses come in. I was a little upset that the government gave rebuilding grants to many un-insured people, that had no flood insurance. At least they were forced to build to the new standards, and our area is much improved as a result. The local government loves it, as tax values are much higher now, and there is less burden next time it floods. Two hurricanes will definitely flush out all the substandard housing and buildings in the area!

Many of the rebuilt houses in jurisdictions that do not enforce the FEMA elevation requirements, cannot get flood insurance as a result of the local gov not wanting to enforce the standards, in fact prior to Rita, we could build anything we wanted to in Cameron parish. Afterwards, the parish decided to not allow that anymore, so that we could get federal flood insurance ( have to follow FEMA guidelines in order to get that ).
Old 08-29-2017, 09:20 AM
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Was a guy being interviewed on the Lake Charles LA, news KPLC last night. His home has flooded 5 times since April of THIS YEAR!!!!!!!!! He has rehabbed it each time. He was asked what it was going to take for him to move. His answer: I am waiting on a grant from the Feds/Parish (county for you yanks ) to raise his house.
Old 08-29-2017, 09:29 AM
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My old house was at 12' elevation. Hurricane fran had water one foot from coming in. I bulldozed that house and built a new one. Land is in the flood plain. County required me to go to I think 14', I went up to 16.6' to get a little more margin. Hope that is high enough. If a Hugo hits here, it will not be. I took a gamble.
Old 08-29-2017, 09:29 AM
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In Palm Beach County you are not allowed to spend more than 50% of the assesed buildings value on any improvements or renovations in flood areas.. This is forcing many people to rebuild completely and with mandatory higher elevation on the site. In theory it gradually eliminates flood prone houses.
Old 08-29-2017, 09:30 AM
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Originally Posted by KDM View Post
Was a guy being interviewed on the Lake Charles LA, news KPLC last night. His home has flooded 5 times since April of THIS YEAR!!!!!!!!! He has rehabbed it each time. He was asked what it was going to take for him to move. His answer: I am waiting on a grant from the Feds/Parish (county for you yanks ) to raise his house.
FEMA allocates a max of $30k to elevate or razz and I think the grants are $50k max. Insure a foundation company and almost every house they elevate is $50k so that's probably why. Many got the grant after Rita and pissed it away and know the goobment can't get blood form a turnip.
Old 08-29-2017, 10:23 AM
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Land surveyor here, licensed in VA and NC.

Local governments adopt flood ordinances that dictate specifications for new construction and restorations. FEMA sets the base flood elevations and flood zones by way of their maps, the local municipalities adopt them and set their regulations.

Locally in VA, the localities are setting a free board level which is 3 feet above the AE Base flood elevation.

For example, in Poquoson, VA, a new house in flood zone AE, Base flood elevation 8, has to have its living spaces at an elevation of 11 feet. 8 foot BFE plus the required freeboard of 3 feet. Then of course you have to have the proper flood vents, etc.

That's generally how it works around the Hampton Roads area with some minor differences per locality.
Old 08-29-2017, 10:52 AM
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Is there any real way to stop or slow down a flood like there is in Houston? They are calling it a 500 year storm. These floods are happening more frequent and something is going on here. Coastal cities need to figure out how to displace all that water. It would be ground breaking if the army core of engineers or any could redirect that water somewhere else. Maybe to other states in need of it.


"Experts are calling Harvey a "500-year flood," meaning there is a 1-in-500 annual chance that something like this could happen. Since 500-year floods are so rare, cities don't always prepare for that kind of worst case scenario. Houston's anti-flood policy, called the Hazard Mitigation Plan, addresses 100-year floods, not 500-year ones.
Then again, Houston has seen three 500-year floods in the past decade — in 2009, 2015, and 2016. On a national level, there were also eight 500-year flood events from August 2015 to August 2016, according to the National Weather Service. And from 2010 to 2016, the US experienced over a dozen "1,000-year floods.""
Old 08-29-2017, 11:18 AM
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Displace a trillion gallons of water???

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