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My sons 6 and into lifting weights

Old 08-26-2017, 01:42 PM
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Default My sons 6 and into lifting weights

So he's 6 yo and I'm not sure if it's healthy to have him lift weights but he's into it big time. Every morning he's doing push-ups sit-ups and curling. Is this ok for a kid his age? And what can I do to either discourage or in courage him??
Old 08-26-2017, 01:43 PM
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He's got the build for it...
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Old 08-26-2017, 01:54 PM
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Nothing wrong with his desire or attitude for physical activity. You should be proud of and support his athletic interests. He's setting a course for a very healthy and competitive future. As far as lifting weights.. as long as it's in moderation and done as part of a well rounded exercise program he'll be fine. If he were focusing on only weights and over doing it at his age it could result in stunting growth. Make sure you're feeding him a well balanced diet higher on the protein side with lean meat and dairy at his age. Stay away from fast food empty calories.


Good luck and he looks like a healthy kid
Old 08-26-2017, 01:55 PM
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Defintely no heavy weights. Using own body weight as resistance for push ups and sit ups is fine, and about all he should be doing at that age.
Old 08-26-2017, 01:56 PM
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It is not healthy for a child that young to be lifting weights....exercises with his own body weight are great and encouraged, but not added weight. Sit ups, push ups, pull ups, dips, squats, etc with own body weight are all excellent, slow and controlled with good form, even better when coupled with a good stretching routine. Only thing I would allow him to do with very light weights would be curls with strict form....back up against the wall, drop weight to waist level (don't let the arms fully extend) the curl weight back up to the point his elbows have a 90 degree bend in them...no higher. Make sure he keeps his back against the wall, elbows stationary and in constant contact with sides. Good form with no more than 20 lbs or so.....body weight only for everything else.
Old 08-26-2017, 02:06 PM
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Go get em young man but very light weights and reps, reps, reps ONLY. Better yet pulls ups, push ups, sit ups etc.
Old 08-26-2017, 02:43 PM
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Recommended is body weight only to avoid growth issues and associated health risks.
Old 08-26-2017, 02:45 PM
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Don't ask on a forum, ask your son's pediatrician...
Old 08-26-2017, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by rickboat View Post
Don't ask on a forum, ask your son's pediatrician...
This is true. Do not let him hurt himself and damage his young bones and tendons.
I have some damage that I did at 14 years-old that I still feel at 52. That was farm work when I was trying to out do the big guys.
Old 08-26-2017, 03:01 PM
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Originally Posted by rickboat View Post
Don't ask on a forum, ask your son's pediatrician...
No way .... The hull "truth" duaaaa...
Old 08-26-2017, 03:51 PM
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A fair amount of research suggests that the long bone ends do not fully complete their hardening until between 16-20 y.o. Too much and too heavy can cause problems. Body weight exercises are generally preferred for kids your sons age.

Only your doctor can assess the bone age of your son, which can be different from chronological age, and give better guidelines.
Old 08-26-2017, 03:53 PM
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NG!! Have to over 15/16; per MD
Old 08-26-2017, 09:37 PM
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If you get him on the juice now he will definitely get drafted early and youll be able to retire early.
Just sayin..... :-)
Old 08-26-2017, 10:24 PM
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Timely question, OP! I am going through the same thing with one of my 7yo twins.

My son does push-ups. LOTS of push-ups. Like, more push-ups than any adult. You guys are saying this is okay? That even very high reps of his own body weight are okay?

==>Rapi

Rapi beats the worst heat.
Old 08-27-2017, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Rapi View Post
Timely question, OP! I am going through the same thing with one of my 7yo twins.

My son does push-ups. LOTS of push-ups. Like, more push-ups than any adult. You guys are saying this is okay? That even very high reps of his own body weight are okay?

==>Rapi

Rapi beats the worst heat.

No, I'm saying the off topic section of a boating forum probably isn't the best place to seek information about the development and well being of your child.
Old 08-27-2017, 08:34 AM
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Body weight reps are generally good for any exercise at that age because if it hurts, he will stop without any irreparable harm.

Actual weight lifting is not recommended because joints are not ready for the extra weight until fully grown.
Old 08-27-2017, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Rapi View Post
Timely question, OP! I am going through the same thing with one of my 7yo twins.

My son does push-ups. LOTS of push-ups. Like, more push-ups than any adult. You guys are saying this is okay? That even very high reps of his own body weight are okay?

==>Rapi

Rapi beats the worst heat.
No worries. Not sure about actual numbers, but he has to stop at muscle failure, so risk of injury is minor. Overuse injuries are more likely to occur after you are grown.

To the OP: focus him on core strength. It will help him later on when weights are appropriate.
Old 08-27-2017, 10:12 AM
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I would encourage him 1000% to train with body weight excersises and apply some parental common sense to the "it's not healthy for a kid that age to be lifting" remarks.

Problem with weight lifting easily solved, just don't have super heavy weights available for him to hurt himself with. Young kid grunting out max effort bench presses, squats, military etc with a lot of weight, using terrible/no technique, yes not good and potentially deadly if he drops it on himself.

Young kid tossing around some sand filled dumbbells, that might give him a light pump and keep him motivated, awesome in my opinion.

IMO the absolute best thing a young man can do with his spare time is some working out. Will give him self confidence, respect among peers and yes attention from the girls.

Being strong is kinda like being rich, no it doesn't necessarily make you, but it doesn't suck and tends to improve most other areas of your life....
Old 08-27-2017, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by rit.05 View Post
Body weight reps are generally good for any exercise at that age because if it hurts, he will stop without any irreparable harm.

Actual weight lifting is not recommended because joints are not ready for the extra weight until fully grown.
How about 5 lb curls, or 10 lb curls ...

The weights are going to be less than his body weight..unless he is Arnold Schwarzenegger junior....

So if some one weighs 80 lbs and is doing dips, how is that any better than say 20 lb triceps pull downs..?
Old 08-27-2017, 11:27 AM
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most pediatricians would tell you that you have to limit the stress on still developing bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles and will recommend calisthenics and body weight exercises only

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