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Anybody not know how to swim?

Old 07-22-2017, 11:19 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by AC View Post
I can't imagine not knowing how to swim. In Florida you better learn quick or your dead.My kids learned at two.
How long does it take ?

I have been here 40 years so far maybe tomorrow?

I have a friend who's wife got up in the middle of the night a bit hungry,took one bite out of an apple and choked to death.

So can we add do not eat apples in Florida?

Swimming pool deaths in Florida are high because of the number of pools and the long season,summer time up north there are pool deaths also,I guess the moral of that would be to watch ones children.

No strong swimmers have ever drown?
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Old 07-23-2017, 03:08 AM
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I am like Diverboy, just can't float. Always have a flotation device in deeper water. Affects my ability to snorkel, etc. and I had my Boy Scout Swimmer merit badge as a kid. Body changed, sheesh
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Old 07-23-2017, 03:45 AM
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Long time competitive swimmer. Wife and I met on a swim teaml...awwwww. We are both very comfortable in the water.

We have a 2 yo and 4 mo old. Between the boat, a pool club we belong to and grandparents cottages / condos, we are always near the water.

The joke is, if our kids can't swim, they're going back.

We dunked oldest under at about 8 months old. Pretty funny reaction but he didn't cry . Oldest now is putting his head under with goggles and has jumped off the side to me etc.

I can see how not knowing how to swim would be extremely scary. A lot of people I think don't try to feel the water. Keep calm. Move your hands and feet and scull. See how you move around with just a few movements. The panic rush movements are trouble. Example is letting a rip current take you vs fighting it.


I can't wait for the Half lap 6 and under races. I'll be diving right in as a starting block haha.
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Old 07-23-2017, 07:24 AM
  #44  
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A friend and his wife sailed to the south pacific on their 28' sailboat, the wife didn't know how to swim
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Old 07-23-2017, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Chimpo View Post
I got called racist the other day because I asked my daughter if her friend, who is black, could swim. All but one of the adults I know that can't swim, or swim like a rock, are black guys, so it seemed like a logical question since he was coming out on the boat with us.

Apparently, I'm just an old out of touch racist...
The first question I ask people that I do not know when they board my boat is "can you swim"
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Old 07-23-2017, 09:15 AM
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The bigger question is not whether one knows how to swim, but for how long and how far. Of the two, I would rather be a lousy swimmer with a PFD than a good swimmer without in the case of as boating emergency.
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Old 07-23-2017, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Rjh1960 View Post
I grew up in Minnesota,camping,fishing etc.

Served 4 years in the navy on a carrier and have owned homes with pools,I swim like a rock.

My father tried the take me to the middle of the lake and throw me in to learn aspect which did not work well.

I can doggy paddle and swim under water, but not far because more so of the smoking aspect, it was all based on the fear and panic aspect but as I got older I learned to be able to control the panic aspect.Military aspect of mind over matter and stay calm in trying situations.

I spend a lot of time on boats and always wear a pfd,I was out by myself once in the gulf and had to clear a tangled prop shaft under the boat and tied a rope to myself and went under the boat and cleared the shaft and really did not feel panicked.

I think it is no different then those with a fear of heights,enclosed spaces or even spiders and snakes once that little bug is in ones brain it is just the way things are,it does not make anybody a better or worse person.

I have a friend that is a strong swimmer that you could not drag into a boat and another's wife,strong swimmer,who will get in and enjoy boating as long as she can see land outside of that forget it.
How did you get through Navy boot camp not being able to swim? When I was in the Navy had to swim a pool both ways plus jump off a 40 foot platform.
My wife never learned to swim and won't try.
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Old 07-23-2017, 09:44 AM
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I wonder what the percentage of drowning deaths are?? Swimmers vs non swimmers. I bet more swimmers drown then non swimmers.... mainly because of ignorance or over confidence, I know I can't swim so.... I don't.
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Old 07-23-2017, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by llord View Post
I wonder what the percentage of drowning deaths are?? Swimmers vs non swimmers. I bet more swimmers drown then non swimmers.... mainly because of ignorance or over confidence, I know I can't swim so.... I don't.
There are people that have survived a long time in the right conditions. Usually water temp is the equalizer in ability. Worth or without a pfd.
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Old 07-23-2017, 08:14 PM
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My grandfather was a signalman in the Navy, was on landing craft at Normandy. Then joined the merchant marines. He was sunk twice. Continued with now BP for 30 years crossing the Atlantic. That farm boy from Tenn never learned to swim.
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Old 07-23-2017, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Terry Sunstone View Post
How did you get through Navy boot camp not being able to swim? When I was in the Navy had to swim a pool both ways plus jump off a 40 foot platform.
My wife never learned to swim and won't try.
They put you in a remedial swim class and by the time you're ready to graduate everyone passes. I thought the swim test in boot camp was a joke. Then I went to aircrew school and had to swim a mile in a flight suit and boots. That was a little tougher, but not really that bad - just boring. I hate swimming, but I know how.

My mom has lived next to a lake for 52 years and never learned to swim. At least she made sure us kids all took lessons. This is probably because she had a big time scare when my older brother almost drowned at age 2. The mother of my children, on the other hand, seems to think swimming is not important, even though they are in the pool all summer long and on the boat with me.
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Old 07-24-2017, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by LI32 View Post
I think the percentage who can't swim is far higher than those on THT would believe.
I think I read that the number of adults in the USA who can't swim at all hovers around 25% - lots of inner city people who never had access to a pool, boat or body of water where you just can't wade in; and the percentage who can't swim 25 yards free-style is closer to 40%.
It is pretty unlikely that the percentage of non-swimmers on a boating site mirrors the general population.
We have alot of state parks here that are reservoirs and very deep! Weekly people drown. My sister kayaks/ fishes from them and is astonished at how many city folks show up with an air mattress and launch it from a boat ramp with a cooler and think they will be OK. It's either Darwinism or negligence to be entering a deep body of water without a PFD and not know how to swim.

I've always had trouble with the "floating" part, maybe because I'm rather slim however I'm comfortable in the water. My father swam competitively through HS/ College and is a total fish, could still swim a marathon at 62.
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Old 07-24-2017, 06:55 AM
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It sounds like most people who didn't learn early never try. I'd think if my parents had never put me around water growing up, I'd have tried to learn myself somewhere around 18-25.

Maybe not though.... they didn't put me in gymnastics and I don't really feel compelled to go learning that any time soon.
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Old 07-24-2017, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by llord View Post
I wonder what the percentage of drowning deaths are?? Swimmers vs non swimmers. I bet more swimmers drown then non swimmers.... mainly because of ignorance or over confidence, I know I can't swim so.... I don't.
That's a good question. I found this from ILSF.org
Worldwide, most drownings occur to people in three age categories:

0 to 5 years old
20 to 25 years old
over 60 years old
Those kind of make sense. 0-5 years old makes the most sense, since they are kids. 20-25 years old is kind of odd, but that could be alcohol, or bravado induced.

If you've survived to adulthood, you are probably not going to drown. If you live in an area where water and swimming pools are common, not teaching a kid how to swim seems irresponsible to me. Things can happen quickly. I remember 4 incidents that could have turned bad.

1. When I was younger, my cousin, who was a toddler wandered into our pool. My parents and his mom were there, but his mom couldn't swim. My dad ended up jumping in and pulling him out.

2. A buddy came over to my house with his young daughter to swim. She was in with her floaties, and had a good time. When it was time to get out, he took off her floats and dried her off. She apparently wanted to go in the water again, and in she went. My buddy saw her quickly and grabbed her by the hair to pull her in.

The next two incidents happened to my own children. Both had been through Survival swim training. Incident number 2 above really got me thinking, so I never got any of my kids any floaties to use in the pool. Instructor agreed as she felt it changed their position in the water and could lead to false confidence.

3. Oldest daughter was around 2 or 3 and we were visiting my parents. She was with my mom by the pool. She tried to get a ball that was near the edge of the pool and slipped in. Before my mom could react, she swam to the edge of the pool just like she was taught.

4. Younger daughter was under 1 year old. Just starting to walk, but still shaky. I took her with me in the pool. Mostly, she was just sitting on the top step. I was right next to her, and she took a step deeper. I held myself back a bit to see what she would do. Sure enough, she flipped herself face up and floated just like she was taught. I picked her up, and she was ready to play in the water once again.
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Old 07-24-2017, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Terry Sunstone View Post
How did you get through Navy boot camp not being able to swim? When I was in the Navy had to swim a pool both ways plus jump off a 40 foot platform.
My wife never learned to swim and won't try.

post 51 with the swim class teaching to float ,then jump from the tower and doggy paddle to the edge of the pool.

Verses jump,remove pants,tie knots in the leg openings,slam over head to trap air to use as a flotation device.

That was in the 70s.

OTC before it was decommissioned was in the paper for throwing some from the tower that did not know how to swim and they drowned.

What would the survival rate be if a ship goes down in the north seas,strong swimmer or not?

There was probably 60 or so in the swim class at the time.
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Old 07-24-2017, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Diverboy View Post
I cannot "swim" or float...I sink like a rock. I grew up in Florida, lived on a river, I'm a diver and love the water. I can stay afloat, but it takes effort and I know I could not do it for long periods of time, therefore I never jump off the boat without some type of flotation device or tag line.

What Dive outfit certified you? We had to swim 12 laps (300 meters) in a pool before the class to prove we could swim (PADI)
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Old 07-24-2017, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by GravyBoat View Post
What Dive outfit certified you? We had to swim 12 laps (300 meters) in a pool before the class to prove we could swim (PADI)
When was this?

I was PADI certified in 1990, and didn't actually swim during the course. I could swim, it just was never tested. The "open water" dives consisted of wading into the bay up to around 8-9' deep and doing drills. I only ever did a single checkout dive, though another was scheduled. I now know that this instructor sucked.

I got a second certification where there was a swim test. It was a swim across the narrow side of an olympic sized pool. I misunderstood the instructions. I thought we had to do it on a single breath, so that's what I did.
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Old 07-25-2017, 12:39 AM
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It used to be a requirement by the University system of Georgia that in order to graduate, one of your core classes was swimming (scuba could be substituted). Not sure if this is still a requirement though.
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Old 07-25-2017, 01:13 AM
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I have a friend who doesn't know how to swim, but owns a boat. He wears a life jacket any time he goes out. Something about a near death experience.
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Old 07-25-2017, 03:35 AM
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I live on the Outer Banks. Large numbers of beach goers/boaters/surfers/windsurfers/kiteboarders/kayakers/sailors/swimmers mixing with water on both the oceanside and soundside. This topic is close to home. Some observations:

I think we had a record number of ocean drownings in 2016 (close to 11 I think). Almost all occur on relatively calm days with small and mild rip currents. The typical incident involves someone who is not just a weak swimmer, but has no water survival skills or confidence being in open water over their head. The second they can't touch bottom they have about 20 seconds before they start to panic. Once panic sets in.....well you know the rest...

I know many watermen (surfers, boaters, divers, etc) who have very limited swimming skills, but excellent open water survival skills (which is not the same as swimming skills, though there is some minor overlap), and most importantly, the confidence to know what to do to not panic. That confidence comes from practice and experience, basically just a lot of time in the water in different conditions.

That poster quoting 25% of adults not being able to swim probably doesn't sound too far off. I'll bet it's higher, and I'd go a step further and say that more than 50% of adults could not make it 50 yards. It's not a survival/safety thing, it's just a shame to be missing out on such a great activity for our obese ridden society

Wonder about the percentage of THTers that could pass the 50 yd swim test, relative to the number that are in the obese category.......
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