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What happens if my account goes to collections?

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What happens if my account goes to collections?

Old 06-27-2017, 10:52 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by ahoymarineproduct View Post
The answer to "I just want to know what will happen when I don't pay it" is that it will go to collections and it will affect your credit score. As much as I would like to say don't pay it, the truth is the have you by the short hairs. Pay the invoice then fight it. It's really the only way to stop it from going to collection. If you allow it to go to collection you can negotiate the invoice down but rest assured you do not want to go through that hassle and you credit will still take a hit.

Welcome to 21st century healthcare where the word "care" takes on a whole new meaning.
So it goes to collections, I refuse to pay it or negotiate it.
Then what happens?
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Old 06-27-2017, 10:52 AM
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Why does anyone think that someone is going to help the OP? The OP has no recourse.

The collection company paid an amount to "someone", so that someone already has their money. The collection company makes money off of you paying. If I remember correctly from my loan underwriting days, once it goes to the collection dept it still shows up on your credit report. Someone please correct me if I am wrong on that.

All of this and you are still left with two options: Pay it, and it probably still appears on your credit report, but might not affect your "score"; or dont pay it, and your score takes a couple of points drop. Are you planning to make any large purchases in the next couple of years?

In my case I bought a house 3 years ago (ie, not moving), just bought a car through the same credit union which I have paid off 4 previous notes, and truthfully dont care about a "credit score".
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Old 06-27-2017, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by GAStingray View Post
So it goes to collections, I refuse to pay it or negotiate it.
Then what happens?
You dispute it. You provide the collection company with your paperwork. You demand that they show you their proof of your liability concerning this bill. You end the letter with something like this, "I will hold both xxx company and your client, xxx, responsible for any damages to my credit score due to this misunderstanding."

Worked for me about a year ago. My credit score didn't go down a point...
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:04 AM
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DO NOT LET IT GO TO COLLECTIONS. Not only will you're score take a substantial hit 50-75 points+) you're banks that obtain you're scores also look at Payment history. that is 35% of you're overall score, second is Total use of credit.

A bank sees Late payments and especially a Collections issue as a HUGE red flag and puts you in high risk lending bracket. This will substantially hurt you're approval and interest on accounts applied for. BIGGEST thing is ANY derogatory marks on you're credit score lasts 5-10 yrs including a late payment.

Pay this bill, get it out of the way so it wont ding you're score and keep it in good standing THEN fight the bill for reimbursement etc.

This is coming from a person who's friend works for Experian Credit
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by GAStingray View Post
So it goes to collections, I refuse to pay it or negotiate it.
Then what happens?
If it gets that far, you contact the law offices of Dewey, Cheatem, & Howe and have them write a letter to the collection agency.

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Old 06-27-2017, 11:10 AM
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There's a sample letter in this link

https://consumerist.com/2007/07/18/s...ection-notice/
If you’ve received a notice from a debt collector, but have reason to believe you don’t actually owe that debt (or owe a lot less than they say you owe), federal law gives you a brief opportunity to force the collector to demonstrate that you do indeed owe this debt, and to stop trying to collect on it until they have verified you are the one responsible, and that the money is still owed.

There are several reasons why you might dispute a debt collection notice: You believe the collector has the wrong person; the amount being sought is much higher than you think is really owed; the debt is so old that you are no longer legally obliged to pay it (Note: The statute of limitations on debt varies by state).

The “Disputed Debts” clause of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act gives you a 30-day window within which to dispute the debt in writing, and request that the collector provide more detailed information about the debt and documentation showing that it has verified that you are in fact the person that owes this money. Until the collector provides this written verification, it may not continue to collect on the debt or seek judgment in court.

Below is a sample, fill-in-the-blank letter that you can use as a guide for disputing a debt with a collector. The Federal Trade Commission advises that you be as specific as possible in the letter about the reason why you think you do not owe this debt (or owe all of it, if you’re disputing the amount), but you should “give as little personal information as possible” in the letter.

To confirm that the letter has been received, we recommend sending it by certified mail with “return receipt requested,” so you have it for your records later, if needed.
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Team Rock On View Post
There's a sample letter in this link

https://consumerist.com/2007/07/18/s...ection-notice/
If you’ve received a notice from a debt collector, but have reason to believe you don’t actually owe that debt (or owe a lot less than they say you owe), federal law gives you a brief opportunity to force the collector to demonstrate that you do indeed owe this debt, and to stop trying to collect on it until they have verified you are the one responsible, and that the money is still owed.

There are several reasons why you might dispute a debt collection notice: You believe the collector has the wrong person; the amount being sought is much higher than you think is really owed; the debt is so old that you are no longer legally obliged to pay it (Note: The statute of limitations on debt varies by state).

The “Disputed Debts” clause of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act gives you a 30-day window within which to dispute the debt in writing, and request that the collector provide more detailed information about the debt and documentation showing that it has verified that you are in fact the person that owes this money. Until the collector provides this written verification, it may not continue to collect on the debt or seek judgment in court.

Below is a sample, fill-in-the-blank letter that you can use as a guide for disputing a debt with a collector. The Federal Trade Commission advises that you be as specific as possible in the letter about the reason why you think you do not owe this debt (or owe all of it, if you’re disputing the amount), but you should “give as little personal information as possible” in the letter.

To confirm that the letter has been received, we recommend sending it by certified mail with “return receipt requested,” so you have it for your records later, if needed.
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:15 AM
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Thanks Rock On
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:31 AM
  #29  
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I disputed a emergency room visit charge of over $3500

I was insured for emergency

the Hospital filed it as non emergency after a 7 hour stay in the ER with several does of morphine

I disputed it
refused to pay it
told countless collection agencies to F'off that the charge was disputed

it dinged my credit score.........but not too bad

5 years later after multiple attempts to settle with the Hospital ER and negotiations with the insurance company

I finally negotiated the settlement with the Hospital directly and they agreed to mail notifications to credit agencies


it will ding your score
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Old 06-27-2017, 12:14 PM
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the black and white of it is, after all parties have been paid out and there is a balance due, you're more than likely on the hook for it.

billing errors are obviously a common occurrence. you can ask that all parties involved rebill it...

it may or may not have an impact on the credit score should you choose not to pay.

I'd further look into your insurance plan and/or options, someone in HR should be able to help you with questions for future planning purposes.

------------
I busted my wrist 4 years ago in my Sunday night beer (hockey) league. hospital butchered the billing. I was on the hook for $5oo something.

I had done the hospital payment plan. they STILL Fd it up, sent it to collections 3 months later while I was in the process of getting squared away with hospital.

fast forward a year, collections calls, letters, a lot of F yous to many people. I got it squared away with the hospital. never hit my credit score.
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Old 06-27-2017, 12:24 PM
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Keep a copy of the EOB stating they are in network with negotiated rates.

Doug
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Old 06-27-2017, 12:40 PM
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do you have a book listing the group as an in network provider? if so your fight is with them, not the collection agency. if it is not for deductible but for not using the correct discount threaten the anesthesia group with legal action. and then follow thru. they signed a contract, they screwed up, they filed wrong, they are causing you harm by sending you to collections.

your insurance agency or local agent who signed up the group should be involved. tell them if they do not help they will be included in the lawsuit

also contact the state insurance commissioner. this really does work. several of the hmo's I deal with have had to stop enrolling due to too many complaints
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Old 06-27-2017, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by rdmallory View Post
Keep a copy of the EOB stating they are in network with negotiated rates.

Doug
Don't worry, I have all my documentation. Don't know how much it will help though, unless it goes to court. The EOB copy has already been provided to AA. They don't care.
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Old 06-27-2017, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by devildogdad View Post
do you have a book listing the group as an in network provider? if so your fight is with them, not the collection agency. if it is not for deductible but for not using the correct discount threaten the anesthesia group with legal action. and then follow thru. they signed a contract, they screwed up, they filed wrong, they are causing you harm by sending you to collections.

your insurance agency or local agent who signed up the group should be involved. tell them if they do not help they will be included in the lawsuit

also contact the state insurance commissioner. this really does work. several of the hmo's I deal with have had to stop enrolling due to too many complaints
Some good advice. Thank you.
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Old 06-27-2017, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by SOA View Post
Why does anyone think that someone is going to help the OP? The OP has no recourse.

The collection company paid an amount to "someone", so that someone already has their money. The collection company makes money off of you paying. If I remember correctly from my loan underwriting days, once it goes to the collection dept it still shows up on your credit report. Someone please correct me if I am wrong on that.

All of this and you are still left with two options: Pay it, and it probably still appears on your credit report, but might not affect your "score"; or dont pay it, and your score takes a couple of points drop. Are you planning to make any large purchases in the next couple of years?

In my case I bought a house 3 years ago (ie, not moving), just bought a car through the same credit union which I have paid off 4 previous notes, and truthfully dont care about a "credit score".
A collection company does not pay off the debt they try and collect and then get paid a % for their work. At this point it has not gone to collections.
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Old 06-27-2017, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Team Rock On View Post
There's a sample letter in this link

https://consumerist.com/2007/07/18/s...ection-notice/
If you’ve received a notice from a debt collector, but have reason to believe you don’t actually owe that debt (or owe a lot less than they say you owe), federal law gives you a brief opportunity to force the collector to demonstrate that you do indeed owe this debt, and to stop trying to collect on it until they have verified you are the one responsible, and that the money is still owed.

There are several reasons why you might dispute a debt collection notice: You believe the collector has the wrong person; the amount being sought is much higher than you think is really owed; the debt is so old that you are no longer legally obliged to pay it (Note: The statute of limitations on debt varies by state).

The “Disputed Debts” clause of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act gives you a 30-day window within which to dispute the debt in writing, and request that the collector provide more detailed information about the debt and documentation showing that it has verified that you are in fact the person that owes this money. Until the collector provides this written verification, it may not continue to collect on the debt or seek judgment in court.

Below is a sample, fill-in-the-blank letter that you can use as a guide for disputing a debt with a collector. The Federal Trade Commission advises that you be as specific as possible in the letter about the reason why you think you do not owe this debt (or owe all of it, if you’re disputing the amount), but you should “give as little personal information as possible” in the letter.

To confirm that the letter has been received, we recommend sending it by certified mail with “return receipt requested,” so you have it for your records later, if needed.
Correct. Being that is medical records they will need, they cannot prove it. Unless you specifically signed a release to said debt collector. It would be illegal for them to obtain your medical records or any history that you were even there.

Been in a similar situation.
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Old 06-27-2017, 12:52 PM
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you might also want to contact the manager of the surgery center where you had the procedure.tell him the doctor's name and give your story. the manager sees this doc every day and will say something to him. the doctor might not even know there is a problem.

I tell you this as a doctor, I would get a call instantly from the surgery center's manager if a patient called with this type of complaint.
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by devildogdad View Post
you might also want to contact the manager of the surgery center where you had the procedure.tell him the doctor's name and give your story. the manager sees this doc every day and will say something to him. the doctor might not even know there is a problem.

I tell you this as a doctor, I would get a call instantly from the surgery center's manager if a patient called with this type of complaint.

Thank you, I am sure the doctor has no idea about any of this. My complaint is not with him of course, but I will try this approach. He may want to know.
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:15 PM
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you still got me thinking about this, I would also contact the GI Doc who did the colonoscopy. tell him what is up. HE has access to the head of the group. What will happen is he will seek out the head of the group in his office or the lunch room, and say " I have a patient with a valid complaint and they are being brushed off by your staff" no one wants to hear that. I can almost guarantee you this will get some action
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:22 PM
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Originally Posted by GAStingray View Post
The billing company is claiming that this doctor is out of my network.
Well, on the date of service, he was or he wasn't. If he was included, he's stuck with the terms of the group insurance contract. If he wasn't, make him prove it, and if he can, then someone screwed up. An out-of-network physician should never have been in the room with you. I'd be asking some questions at the facility where the service was rendered, and of the physician who performed the procedure. Bottom line, he eats it. I think his billing staff is bluffing. I would be willing to call them on it.

Sorry, I have had no collection issues like this, so I don't know what the credit hit would be like. I wouldn't care that much either way.
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