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Death penalty opinions

Old 04-20-2017, 11:41 AM
  #81  
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I was in Singapore recently and knew they has some VERY strict laws. So I decided to look them up. Conviction of these crimes comes with MANDATORY DEATH SENTENCE:
  • Cannabis (more than 18 ounces)
  • Cocaine (more than 30 grams)
  • Heroin (more than 15 grams)
  • Methamphetamine (more than 250 grams)
  • Those involved in the manufacturing, possession or custody or under their control (like having keys to a meth lab) will also be liable for the death penalty.
  • Though 70 percent of hangings are for drug-related offences, other crimes that call for the execution include:
  • Waging or attempting to wage war or abetting the waging of war against the Government
  • Offences against the President’s person
  • Piracy that endangers life
  • Perjury that results in the execution of an innocent person
  • Murder
  • Abetting the suicide of a person under the age of 18 or an “insane” person
  • Attempted murder by a prisoner serving a life sentence
  • Kidnapping or abducting in order to murder
  • Robbery committed by five or more people that results in the death of a person
  • Using or attempting to use arms to commit scheduled offences like unlawful assembly; rioting; certain offences against the person; abduction or kidnapping; extortion; burglary; robbery; preventing or resisting arrest; vandalism; mischief.

They definitely have a low crime rate.
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Old 04-20-2017, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Recovery Room View Post
I was in Singapore recently and knew they has some VERY strict laws. So I decided to look them up. Conviction of these crimes comes with MANDATORY DEATH SENTENCE:
  • Perjury that results in the execution of an innocent person
  • Attempted murder by a prisoner serving a life sentence
We should adopt those ones!
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Old 04-20-2017, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Cracker View Post
Just curious, what if it was your family member that was wrongly accused and it was over 100k to put up a defense that MIGHT have a chance of clearing your relative would you think the death penalty was viable then???
For some odd reason, I see your reasoning as somewhat of a contradiction to your tag line....

I don't see the cost of defending a wrongly accused relative as an indictment on the validity of the death penalty. If you don't think your relative is worth 100K then one you is not much of a person.

I can understand someone not being in favor of the death penalty for a variety of reasons, religion being the most legitimate, but the cost of defense is not one I would say ranks very high in my book.
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Old 04-20-2017, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by rbhankins001 View Post
You're a better man than I am.

Powerful statement.
Thank you but instead of "better man" could we agree on "a man with different life experiences"?
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Old 04-20-2017, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by 1blueheron View Post
For some odd reason, I see your reasoning as somewhat of a contradiction to your tag line....

I don't see the cost of defending a wrongly accused relative as an indictment on the validity of the death penalty. If you don't think your relative is worth 100K then one you is not much of a person.

I can understand someone not being in favor of the death penalty for a variety of reasons, religion being the most legitimate, but the cost of defense is not one I would say ranks very high in my book.
Point being you can be found not guilty but still financially ruined.Also another by product of being falsely accused, albeit many found not guilty are not innocent but some truely are....
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Old 04-20-2017, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by commuter boats View Post
While working in emergency services I've been involved with a couple cases that weren't going particularly well for law enforcement, I have perceived workmanship that would suggest that getting the case off their desk was more important than apprehending the guilty party. A scapegoat ( for the lack of a better term ) was apprehended and any evidence that didn't fit particularly well was misplaced, the scapegoat went to trial and easily won an acquittal and unfortunately due to a lack of retained evidence, the case went cold. I was involved enough to witness firsthand the failures in workmanship, it does happen, people do get railroaded.

There is nothing gray in my daughter's case, the investigators workmanship was excellent, the idiot is serving life with no chance for parole, the only thing the court system could possibly do to make that better for me would have him working in the fields for 12 hours a day seven days a week or some other type of of hard labor to reduce the cost of incarceration to society.
Gerald
You are a good man Gerald, I wish you nothing but happiness with your grand daughter..
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Old 04-20-2017, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Cracker View Post
Point being you can be found not guilty but still financially ruined.Also another by product of being falsely accused, albeit many found not guilty are not innocent but some truely are....
And this is what a counter suit is all about. Its called malicious prosecution suit if the person is truly inncent and was railroaded and falsely accused. In any case, it is better to be poor and have ones freedom than to have money without freedom or to live in fear.

I have less of a moral dilemma with the death penalty handed down by a jury than I do with LEO's who take it upon themselves to be judge, jury, and executioner just because someone didn't understand or obey their orders. I see this as far more common in today's society than abuse or wrongful execution by the justice system. Of course it is the minority of LEO's who are abusing power, just as it is the minority of those prosecuted who are truly "innocent".
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Old 04-20-2017, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by 1blueheron View Post
....
I have less of a moral dilemma with the death penalty handed down by a jury than I do with LEO's who take it upon themselves to be judge, jury, and executioner just because someone didn't understand or obey their orders. ...
Equal to me. Death by policy/process is flawed because all processes have potential for error.
Human processes have potential for willful abuse.
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Old 04-20-2017, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by 1blueheron View Post
And this is what a counter suit is all about. Its called malicious prosecution suit if the person is truly inncent and was railroaded and falsely accused. In any case, it is better to be poor and have ones freedom than to have money without freedom or to live in fear.

I have less of a moral dilemma with the death penalty handed down by a jury than I do with LEO's who take it upon themselves to be judge, jury, and executioner just because someone didn't understand or obey their orders. I see this as far more common in today's society than abuse or wrongful execution by the justice system. Of course it is the minority of LEO's who are abusing power, just as it is the minority of those prosecuted who are truly "innocent".
The problem is it still happens and as far as prosecuting or suing over these incidents it is not super easy to win..

Again, my contention is if it is clear cut (On video or no doubt murder was committed) I have no issue with the death penalty and to have it carried out fairly quickly after a good review....
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Old 04-21-2017, 07:07 AM
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Agreed, unfortunately, there is no way to have a utopian society. There will always be mistakes made and there will always be those who are a threat to society no matter how they are dealt with.
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Old 04-21-2017, 07:16 AM
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Agree with it and support it.
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Old 04-21-2017, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by chrispnet View Post
Equal to me. Death by policy/process is flawed because all processes have potential for error.
Human processes have potential for willful abuse.
Yes sir, there in is the problem....I am glad there are checks and balances but many time the verdict cannot be argued only certain steps..
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Old 04-21-2017, 08:42 AM
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I was going to ask about the demographics of those for and against but I googled it instead...
If you're a well-off, white male you probably support capital punishment....
And support goes down as education goes up, the East Coast is almost 10% less likely to support the death penalty than the West Coast

Hate is an emotion that is debilitating to those who harbor it but does nothing to who is directed at...
Wishing somebody dead is like hate, it will just continually draw from your emotion, your strength... it can become debilitating. I've got enough shit on my shoulders, I try to choose a path that minimizes the unnecessary baggage that life brings on.
Live and let live.
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Old 04-21-2017, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by commuter boats View Post
I was going to ask about the demographics of those for and against but I googled it instead...
If you're a well-off, white male you probably support capital punishment....
And support goes down as education goes up, the East Coast is almost 10% less likely to support the death penalty than the West Coast

Hate is an emotion that is debilitating to those who harbor it but does nothing to who is directed at...
Wishing somebody dead is like hate, it will just continually draw from your emotion, your strength... it can become debilitating. I've got enough shit on my shoulders, I try to choose a path that minimizes the unnecessary baggage that life brings on.
Live and let live.
I have never and hope never to walk in your shoes but your reasoning and forgiveness far outweighs what mine would probably be... I wish you and your family a life filled with blessings because you have certainly been to hell.... You are a good man, Gerald.
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Old 04-21-2017, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by commuter boats View Post
Wishing somebody dead is like hate, it will just continually draw from your emotion, your strength... it can become debilitating.
I don't see it as "wishing someone dead" or anything to do with hate. I'm sure some involved in the actual case may harbor a different perspective, but I just look at it from a societal perspective.

You have some folks who have no respect for life, or for anyone else in society. Why put the risk and burden on everyone else in the society for those few who have no interest in being part of that very society??

If we could still ban them to New Zealand it might be a solution, but these days that's not practical. Give them an option to leave and never come back, if some other country will take them?
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Old 04-21-2017, 07:08 PM
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I'm against it. It is WAY cheaper to house an inmate for life than to kill them. Some people deserve to die as a result of their actions, but I'd rather lock them up for life without parole.
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Old 04-21-2017, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by rbhankins001 View Post
I'd beg the judge to let them out.

Yes!!!
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Old 04-22-2017, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by SurfFishLife View Post
It is WAY cheaper to house an inmate for life than to kill them.
It's only that way because we allow it to be that way.
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Old 04-22-2017, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by FASTFJR View Post
I would like to see the death penalty expanded. Time and again people are killed by someone who was a repeat offended. I'll give you a case in point. About 30 years ago my fiancé was run over a killed while jogging on the sidewalk by a man who was 40 years old. He had 5 prior convections for drunk driving, lost his license for a bunch of years. Yet was still able to get into a car (drunk) and kill an innocent woman. To me it was the same thing as if he had walked up to her and shot her with a gun. The guy got 4 years, was out in 2.5
I wouldve went Russel Crowe and did Law abiding Citizen....
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Old 04-22-2017, 09:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Wolakrab View Post
I really don't believe in absolutes. .
yes! There are NO absolutes
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