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Issue with newly poured concrete

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Issue with newly poured concrete

Old 04-01-2017, 11:04 AM
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Default Issue with newly poured concrete

I just had a garage built. The concrete slab was poured about a year ago. We just moved into the house and found the concrete flaking off the surface. I want to put an epoxy coating on but this issue prevents that from being succesfull. Any ideas whats going on here?

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Old 04-01-2017, 11:11 AM
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Spalling........My bet is it set up to fast. I would go back to the company who poured it. The least they can do is grind it down
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Old 04-01-2017, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by FASTFJR View Post
Spalling........My bet is it set up to fast. I would go back to the company who poured it. The least they can do is grind it down
Yea..burned the surface with the finisher, trapped liquid water underneath.
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Old 04-01-2017, 12:05 PM
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Or they sprinkled powdered cement on it to soak up the bleed water cause they were in a hurry to finish and didn't want to let it bleed out on its own, and when it was trowel finished it has created a cold joint beneath the surface and now the expansion/contraction due to temperatures is popping the top layer of cement that they spread in the wet areas. It could get worse, get a 10' piece of chain, like 3/8" chain not porch swing chain, and drag it over the entire surface and you will hear the hollow spots that are already delaminated but haven't popped off yet. Tap these hollow areas with a hammer to break them out, once you do the entire area that you want to epoxy then clean all of the laitance off really well and make sure no hollow or loose areas remain and then fill the voids with a self leveling Ardex product, cause Ardex can be placed as thin as 1/8", and after the product cure time you will be ready for an epoxy coating. Be sure to follow the Ardex instructions to insure proper bonding so you gave a solid product to coat.
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Old 04-01-2017, 12:07 PM
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I doubt you'll get any satisfaction from the company on a slab that's a year old.
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Old 04-01-2017, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by KBH View Post
I doubt you'll get any satisfaction from the company on a slab that's a year old.
Probably not. But if they have a facebook page pix and posts may help motivate them.
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Old 04-01-2017, 12:22 PM
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pedro fd up
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Old 04-01-2017, 01:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Blue Goose2 View Post
Or they sprinkled powdered cement on it to soak up the bleed water cause they were in a hurry to finish and didn't want to let it bleed out on its own, and when it was trowel finished it has created a cold joint beneath the surface and now the expansion/contraction due to temperatures is popping the top layer of cement that they spread in the wet areas. It could get worse, get a 10' piece of chain, like 3/8" chain not porch swing chain, and drag it over the entire surface and you will hear the hollow spots that are already delaminated but haven't popped off yet. Tap these hollow areas with a hammer to break them out, once you do the entire area that you want to epoxy then clean all of the laitance off really well and make sure no hollow or loose areas remain and then fill the voids with a self leveling Ardex product, cause Ardex can be placed as thin as 1/8", and after the product cure time you will be ready for an epoxy coating. Be sure to follow the Ardex instructions to insure proper bonding so you gave a solid product to coat.
This also!
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Old 04-01-2017, 01:19 PM
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Too much water in mix, too much finishing, etc. Bottom line, crappy job. Same situation in my shop.
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Old 04-01-2017, 01:54 PM
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Botched job period.

I would be getting with the company who effed it up. As someone else said Facebooks your friend if they have a link.
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Old 04-01-2017, 02:22 PM
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I have had it happen, if its just a small area the epoxy guys can pull a wipe across it with some filler and then apply the epoxy coating if its the entire floor thats a different story
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Old 04-01-2017, 02:47 PM
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I'm thinking that is the look associated with what was a very wet mix being poured. Shoot the pic over to a ready-mix plant and get their opinion.
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Old 04-01-2017, 03:07 PM
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Either burned the surface with power finisher or threw portland on the surface to absorb the bleed water. In any case bad finishing. Slab itself may be ok. Modern mixes have so much flash ash and crap in them that all kinds of problems arise.
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Old 04-01-2017, 03:48 PM
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Could be scaling. Bottom line amateur job.

Here is all you want to know about concrete defects and way more.

http://www.cement.org/docs/default-s...r.pdf?sfvrsn=4
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Old 04-01-2017, 07:54 PM
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where are you located? Did the mix contain entrained air? This looks like a typical problem when a garage floor is hard troweled that also contains air entrainment. It's a catch 22 often. The air is needed for cold/freezing conditions to prevent spalling yet if it's hard troweled too early or even at all, often the air that is trying to bleed thru the surface is trapped underneath and will spall later or even during the troweling procedure.

Sorry but don't have an answer for your dilemna.
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