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Stupidity in Design - Most Industrial Equipment/Lawnmowers

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Stupidity in Design - Most Industrial Equipment/Lawnmowers

Old 01-16-2017, 10:42 AM
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Default Stupidity in Design - Most Industrial Equipment/Lawnmowers

Just an observation I've made over the past 10 years ago. Why is it that designers for construction equipment do a great job of realizing that the equipment they make is likely going to occasionally have to be transported, and do a great job of providing proper & sufficient tie down points, but designers of farm, lawn & garden, and industrial equipment (forklifts specifically) don't even think about it???? This just seems like such an obvious provision to be included on all machinery that would ever have the potential to be towed on a trailer

I've hauled 2 different lawn mowers in the past week, and neither of them have tie down points that won't completely mangle a strap. One is a residential mower, so I sort of get it there, but the other is a Kubota ZD326, which is an commercial machine. There is literally nowhere on the machine you can pass a strap that is both non abrasive to a strap, and of sufficient strength to do so. I also saw this same tendency on forklifts when I was in that business. Sit down machines aren't bad, but the stand-up lifts have no securement points to be found. Crazy part is on those machines, the single biggest buyers of them are the dealers, which put them in their rental fleets, which automatically means they are going to have to be properly secured on a regular basis.
Old 01-16-2017, 05:00 PM
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Maybe on the forklifts they figure you can run straps through the boom/forks and most I've seen have a pin in the back for straps. My John Deere 930M has places specifically for tie downs so maybe an oversight by Kubota?
Old 01-16-2017, 06:33 PM
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Think it's mostly a cost issue.
Old 01-16-2017, 06:46 PM
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Originally Posted by 2011skiff View Post
Maybe on the forklifts they figure you can run straps through the boom/forks and most I've seen have a pin in the back for straps. My John Deere 930M has places specifically for tie downs so maybe an oversight by Kubota?
This is very much the case for sit down lifts, but not at all the case for stand up lifts/electric pallet jacks (combined they are roughly 50% of the market). Worst part in them, you can easily damage them in the process of getting them legally, and safely secured.
Old 01-17-2017, 05:08 AM
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I usually see straps over the tires ratcheted down tight to the deck, assuming the trailer is set up for that type of equipment transport.
Old 03-03-2020, 11:30 AM
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My JD commercial walk behind lawn mower has tie down points. But its 25 years old.
Old 03-03-2020, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
Just an observation I've made over the past 10 years ago. Why is it that designers for construction equipment do a great job of realizing that the equipment they make is likely going to occasionally have to be transported, and do a great job of providing proper & sufficient tie down points, but designers of farm, lawn & garden, and industrial equipment (forklifts specifically) don't even think about it???? This just seems like such an obvious provision to be included on all machinery that would ever have the potential to be towed on a trailer

I've hauled 2 different lawn mowers in the past week, and neither of them have tie down points that won't completely mangle a strap. One is a residential mower, so I sort of get it there, but the other is a Kubota ZD326, which is an commercial machine. There is literally nowhere on the machine you can pass a strap that is both non abrasive to a strap, and of sufficient strength to do so. I also saw this same tendency on forklifts when I was in that business. Sit down machines aren't bad, but the stand-up lifts have no securement points to be found. Crazy part is on those machines, the single biggest buyers of them are the dealers, which put them in their rental fleets, which automatically means they are going to have to be properly secured on a regular basis.
as for the lawn equipment, not sure i have ever seen them strapped down? i know i do not but i also have a trailer with the 2 ft sides. as far as heavy equipment that would be hauled on a heavier duty flat bed, yes they need to be strapped down!
Old 03-03-2020, 12:00 PM
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Old 03-03-2020, 12:10 PM
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I hear you. I bought my forklift in Georgia and had it shipped to Wisconsin. I had 4 heavy duty lay flat rings welded on before it left Georgia. Something I felt the manufacturer should have done.
Old 03-03-2020, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
Just an observation I've made over the past 10 years ago. Why is it that designers for construction equipment do a great job of realizing that the equipment they make is likely going to occasionally have to be transported, and do a great job of providing proper & sufficient tie down points, but designers of farm, lawn & garden, and industrial equipment (forklifts specifically) don't even think about it???? This just seems like such an obvious provision to be included on all machinery that would ever have the potential to be towed on a trailer

I've hauled 2 different lawn mowers in the past week, and neither of them have tie down points that won't completely mangle a strap. One is a residential mower, so I sort of get it there, but the other is a Kubota ZD326, which is an commercial machine. There is literally nowhere on the machine you can pass a strap that is both non abrasive to a strap, and of sufficient strength to do so. I also saw this same tendency on forklifts when I was in that business. Sit down machines aren't bad, but the stand-up lifts have no securement points to be found. Crazy part is on those machines, the single biggest buyers of them are the dealers, which put them in their rental fleets, which automatically means they are going to have to be properly secured on a regular basis.
I wouldnt be at all astonished if the owners manual had tie down instructions.
Old 03-03-2020, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Ccx2 View Post
I wouldnt be at all astonished if the owners manual had tie down instructions.
I know for forklifts they don't. Can't say I've looked for either mower, but if there is they are assuming the use of specialty tire straps or similar. A couple of chain slots could be cut into the frame with little/any added cost.

Believe it or not standard MO for shipping forklifts is to ship them in box vans with wooden block nailed in the floor around them. No straps at all. Only thing between them and falling on the roof of other cars is a few nails, some thin sheet metal trailer walls, and a good truck driver.
Old 03-03-2020, 05:26 PM
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Exmark mower has a point at each corner. Very easy to connect chain for secure transport.
Old 03-03-2020, 06:47 PM
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every lawn service I see just drives em up on a 3 sided trailer and throws the parking brake. I guess they don't shift around too much.
Old 03-03-2020, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by ncmallard78 View Post
every lawn service I see just drives em up on a 3 sided trailer and throws the parking brake. I guess they don't shift around too much.
common practice, but not remotely legal.
Old 03-03-2020, 07:24 PM
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They move plenty if I don't strap mine down good luck getting them back off they will jam themselves together on the trailer it takes less time to secure them correctly then to untangle them. Exmark has built in tie down points so no reason not to strap them down.
Old 03-03-2020, 07:38 PM
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Strap? You mean chain and binder.
Old 03-03-2020, 07:59 PM
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My Scag has some tie down points I think, I usually just go through the frame, easy enough. It will bounce around some but not horribly if not strapped in an enclosed trailer or so I have heard. Seen too many pictures of boats on top of trucks to risk not securing it in the event of an accident. Would at least damage other stuff in the trailer if not fly out. Still not as set up as our construction stuff at work.
Old 03-04-2020, 07:07 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
common practice, but not remotely legal.

its not illegal until you get caught!

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