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Is this asbestos? (Pics)

Old 01-13-2017, 03:09 PM
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Default Is this asbestos? (Pics)

Greenboard in the bathroom shower stall. Lot's of very fine straight fibers. It's a holiday weekend and I can't get it tested until Tuesday

1800s house. Tested everything except this
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Old 01-13-2017, 03:12 PM
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Horse hair?
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Old 01-13-2017, 03:13 PM
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I'd say no. An 1800's house in Rhode Island would be plaster and lathe and saw dust insulation. Not green board and bat insulation.
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Old 01-13-2017, 03:16 PM
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I thought horse hair when I saw the first picture.. The green board is too modern for that though..
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Old 01-13-2017, 03:17 PM
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It actually may be. Put it down and get it tested.
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Old 01-13-2017, 03:20 PM
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I would use a respirator to remove it just in case.
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Old 01-13-2017, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Classic25 View Post
I thought horse hair when I saw the first picture.. The green board is too modern for that though..
The picture looks like plaster, as it doesn't seem uniform on the right side.
If it's modern then fiberglass strands.
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Old 01-13-2017, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Dwain View Post
I would use a respirator to remove it just in case.
It's not asbestos but agree on the respirator for removal as it is particulate and shouldn't be breathing in the dust. If it were asbestos a respirator would be no good anyway. These are just the fibers in moisture resistant sheetrock that help it not sag in high moisture environments.
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Old 01-13-2017, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by DotRotten View Post
I'd say no. An 1800's house in Rhode Island would be plaster and lathe and saw dust insulation. Not green board and bat insulation.
That's not lath behind the plaster, whatever it is was not installed in the 1800's.

My house was built in the mid 1700's and has of course been the subject of many renovations.

It's likely that the owner will run into asbestos, lots of lead paint, mold, and other nasties. Wear some PPC and everything will be fine.
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Old 01-13-2017, 05:32 PM
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It's fiberglass. The stuff behind it looks similar to blue board (for a plaster coating)
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Old 01-14-2017, 05:06 AM
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Thanks guys. I agree it might be fibers for moisture or fire retardant
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Old 01-14-2017, 05:31 AM
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That's not asbestos , but in demo in old houses , you run into and they used all kinds of crap.
Protect yourself as if it were.
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Old 01-14-2017, 05:40 AM
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most likely to find asbestos in old floor tiles
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Old 01-14-2017, 05:57 AM
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Sunday, April 22, 2012
The Asbestos Drywall
Asbestos drywall from the late 1950s through the 1980s, manufacturers of building materials sometimes incorporated asbestos drywall to strengthen the sheets, aid in sound absorption, and improve fire resistance. This practice was abandoned following the 1980s, but a large portion of the building materials used during construction during that time period now pose potential health risks.

Types and sizes of Asbestos Drywalls
Green Boards are designed to be water and mold resistant. These drywalls are used in bathrooms in homes.

STOP, get it tested!!! I worked in construction and was required to take asbestos training course, it's not the fibers you see but the micro fibers that you can't see go airborne and will contaminate everything in the house. When pros remove asbestos the contain the room with plastic & tape, set up a negative pressure environment with a hepa filter, double suit with a full face mask, & wash down everything when done all to prevent the micro fibers from going airborne. Don't risk putting your family at risk.
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Old 01-14-2017, 08:16 AM
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If it tastes like chalk with fibers, it might be asbestos.
J/k.

By the way, any one heard about the long term affect of fiberglass?
I have worked in quite a few attics, can't do it 10 minutes with out coughing.
Can't be good.

When dow comes up with a replacement for fiberglass insulation, i'm sure
the fiberglass insulation will be deemed cancer causing and listed as an
environmental hazard.
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Old 01-14-2017, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by twofish View Post
If it tastes like chalk with fibers, it might be asbestos.
J/k.

By the way, any one heard about the long term affect of fiberglass?
I have worked in quite a few attics, can't do it 10 minutes with out coughing.
Can't be good.

When dow comes up with a replacement for fiberglass insulation, i'm sure
the fiberglass insulation will be deemed cancer causing and listed as an
environmental hazard.


Already is

When inhaled, particles can cause coughing, nosebleeds, and other respiratory ailments. Very fine airborne particles are capable of becoming deeply lodged in the lungs and are believed by many to cause cancer and other serious afflictions. OSHA considers this threat to be serious enough that it requires fiberglass insulation to carry a cancer warning label.

Fiberglass Insulation: History, Hazards and Alternatives - InterNACHI
https://www.nachi.org/fiberglass-ins...ternatives.htm
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Old 01-14-2017, 09:18 AM
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Major ditto; working on a house that old you will have no idea what's been used in every remodel that's been done. I would buy a high quality respirator with replaceable particulate filters and wear it the whole time. And keep children away from the work site until everything is sealed up and clean.
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Old 01-14-2017, 09:20 AM
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You should check the old taping compound, any glues, floor tiles, any pipe insulation, especially the elbows.
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Old 01-14-2017, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by PF-88 View Post
Sunday, April 22, 2012
The Asbestos Drywall
Asbestos drywall from the late 1950s through the 1980s, manufacturers of building materials sometimes incorporated asbestos drywall to strengthen the sheets, aid in sound absorption, and improve fire resistance. This practice was abandoned following the 1980s, but a large portion of the building materials used during construction during that time period now pose potential health risks.

Types and sizes of Asbestos Drywalls
Green Boards are designed to be water and mold resistant. These drywalls are used in bathrooms in homes.

STOP, get it tested!!! I worked in construction and was required to take asbestos training course, it's not the fibers you see but the micro fibers that you can't see go airborne and will contaminate everything in the house. When pros remove asbestos the contain the room with plastic & tape, set up a negative pressure environment with a hepa filter, double suit with a full face mask, & wash down everything when done all to prevent the micro fibers from going airborne. Don't risk putting your family at risk.
This is the best info on here. Several different types of asbestos in many different products. The only way to know is to test. Or ask here to get the answer you want.
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Old 01-14-2017, 03:20 PM
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I've worked with it enough to tell you that you cannot tell where it is by simply looking at it. It occurs in even newer drywall from China they found out. Even in some potting soils and vermiculite. In tile mastic and in drywall tape and even in the mud used. Caulk and window glazing. Floor tiles normally only the old 9X9 but if there is Black mastic left under when those were removed the mastic has it. Roofing, Siding... and some of the stuff I have seen I would have sworn was... turned out wasn't. Ya never know. I lost my older Sister to Mesothelioma. Its rare but don't chance it.
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