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Help me build a pole barn

Old 11-13-2016, 04:48 PM
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Default Help me build a pole barn

Wish I started this thread before I started work as I think I made some mistakes already.
Building a 14 wide x 30ft x 14ft high to bottom of trusses long pole barn to store the boat under. All suggestions and help appreciated. In a coastal community so has to be wind rated. I already have all permits. Already cemented in and have approved by inspector 8 poles 6X6. I am now stuck on how to start the framing from pole to pole which will hold up my pre-engineered trusses. Trying to keep this simple. From videos I watched looks like I should notch the top of the post for my 2x10s to rest on is this correct? If so now I have to do it in the air

Old 11-13-2016, 05:04 PM
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You'd have to do it in the air anyway. I'd be really hard to pre-notch them and get them all level. I've built them both ways. Notched and not notched. The pole barn I bill at my house in Orlando I nailed the 2x8's to thee posts. I had one on the outside and inside. I sandwiched the posts. I eventually through bolted them as well with 1/2" galvanized bolts. It's a 25x50 pole barn I built in 98'. Years ga been though 3 back to back hurricanes without any damage. I don't know if this would pass code in your area. I never got a permit for mine. I built a 16 x 54 lean to at my farm in Ga and I notched those posts for the rafters to sit on. It can be a pain in the azz but wasn't really that bad. I did it mostly with a chainsaw because
I didn't have a circular saw with a blade that big.
Old 11-13-2016, 05:13 PM
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If you are usings 2x10's they should be doubled and nailed together to make a header. Attach using the notch and lag bolts. You should be able to notch easily using a level chalk line. Remember a 6x6 is 5-1/2 wide, a 2x10 is 1-1/2 wide and 9-1/2 tall when cutting your notches.

The trusses should have sufficient overhang, typically 18-24" past the 2x10. Install slats or your choice of sheathing plywood for the roof base. Metal roof mounted to slats with exposed fasteners is easiest and cheapest, with least weight.

Since you are in a costal area, you want to make sure to use straps on the trusses. Attach with screws.
Old 11-13-2016, 05:16 PM
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does Simpson make a fastener/bracket which will do the job?
Old 11-13-2016, 05:52 PM
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span from front to back is to long unless you use an eng beam-- you need more post--
Old 11-13-2016, 06:06 PM
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I live in Podunk USA and even here the building code is enforced pretty strictly. My new pole barn design needed the detail of what you are asking, on a drawing and that drawing stamped by a PE in our state. That design was submitted to the building dept and the permit was issued based on the drawing and the code enforcement guy inspected and it had to look like the drawing. You kinda get the premis here. The engineer has all the liability for the design.

It sounds like your enforcement may be a little lax. Which is great. Less is better as long as you do a reasonable job. My 6x6 posts are not notched. The header was nailed at the proper height and 2x6 pieces where nailed underneath on both sides for additional support.

Not saying it's right but notching up in the air perfectly is challenging. Not to mention if you notch both headers into the 6x6 you take 3" out of a 5-1/2" stick of wood. That 2-1/2" remaining seems pretty skinny but I don't pretend to know the building code. I'm just sayin.
Old 11-13-2016, 07:00 PM
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Determine level at the height you want on all poles then cut them off. Use a speed square to make four lines around the pole that should meet up where the 1st and 4th line meet. Set your saw as deep as it will cut and run around all 4 lines. Use a reciprocating saw to finish the cut. Drop down 9.5 inches and draw another line on the outside of the 6x6, set your saw at 1.5 inches of cutting depth and run through the 6x6. On the top of the 6x6 draw a line 1.5 inches from the outside and cut along the line as deep as possible with your saw. Continue the cut down to the 9.5 inch line with a reciprocating saw. Take your time and make sure you are holding the blade level to get a straight cut. Set your 2x10 in this pocket and lag or through bolt to the 6x6. The double 2x10 is a good idea also. If used that way definitely use through bolts to attach. I would use hurricane clips on my trusses after installation.
Old 11-13-2016, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by World Powers View Post
If you are usings 2x10's they should be doubled and nailed together to make a header. Attach using the notch and lag bolts. You should be able to notch easily using a level chalk line. Remember a 6x6 is 5-1/2 wide, a 2x10 is 1-1/2 wide and 9-1/2 tall when cutting your notches.

The trusses should have sufficient overhang, typically 18-24" past the 2x10. Install slats or your choice of sheathing plywood for the roof base. Metal roof mounted to slats with exposed fasteners is easiest and cheapest, with least weight.

Since you are in a costal area, you want to make sure to use straps on the trusses. Attach with screws.
Just built a similar pole barn last year to the OP, and did the above exactly, except we used 2x12s.

I sat under it during Hurricane Matthew to watch, and it had no movement whatsoever. No sides yet, asphalt roof. Very happy with how it turned out. Used a sawzall to notch.

We used hurricane straps on every truss. It was a b!tch but the right way to do it.
Old 11-13-2016, 07:29 PM
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Before you notch or bolt you need to try and get your posts braced off and straight. Even if they are plumb you should put some 2x4's from the top, (below notch or beam) of each post in each direction to the bottom of an adjacent post. I usually get the four corners right first then pull a sting with gauge blocks to line the middle ones. You may even need to use come along or winch to move them but getting things straight now make it much easier when you set trusses or rafters. If you started square and plumbed posts prior to placing the concrete it will be easier. I usually have a lot more braces than you do at this stage but possibly you removed some after the pour.
Old 11-13-2016, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by World Powers View Post
If you are usings 2x10's they should be doubled and nailed together to make a header. Attach using the notch and lag bolts. You should be able to notch easily using a level chalk line. Remember a 6x6 is 5-1/2 wide, a 2x10 is 1-1/2 wide and 9-1/2 tall when cutting your notches.
The trusses should have sufficient overhang, typically 18-24" past the 2x10.
Why do I need double 2x10s? One isnt enough to support a 14ft long truss? Sounds like a lot of overhang was thinking 12-18"?

Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
does Simpson make a fastener/bracket which will do the job?
I was actually thinking about ss joist hangers and put 2x6 underneath that but not sure that would pass.

Originally Posted by Dead Horse View Post
span from front to back is to long unless you use an eng beam-- you need more post--
Span is 14ft

Originally Posted by jkmjr View Post
Set your 2x10 in this pocket and lag or through bolt to the 6x6. The double 2x10 is a good idea also. If used that way definitely use through bolts to attach. I would use hurricane clips on my trusses after installation.
How about if i notch one side and nail the other if i double up?
Old 11-13-2016, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by briankinley2004 View Post
Before you notch or bolt you need to try and get your posts braced off and straight. Even if they are plumb you should put some 2x4's from the top, (below notch or beam) of each post in each direction to the bottom of an adjacent post. I usually get the four corners right first then pull a sting with gauge blocks to line the middle ones. You may even need to use come along or winch to move them but getting things straight now make it much easier when you set trusses or rafters. If you started square and plumbed posts prior to placing the concrete it will be easier. I usually have a lot more braces than you do at this stage but possibly you removed some after the pour.
This is INCREDIBLY important. With a pole barn, it all starts with the poles. You don't have a foundation to go off. You absolutely need to get those perfect in every direction before you move forward. We spent the better part of a Saturday setting poles and bracing them perfectly square and plumb. When it came time to set the trusses, we appreciated all the work we had done
Old 11-13-2016, 08:46 PM
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Old 11-13-2016, 11:25 PM
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What centers are your trusses on or do they fall only on top of the 6x6's? If they fall only on top of the 6x6's then you definitely do not need a doubled band.

I'm not sure how/what you are using as trusses.
Old 11-13-2016, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by NCSUboater View Post
This is INCREDIBLY important. With a pole barn, it all starts with the poles. You don't have a foundation to go off. You absolutely need to get those perfect in every direction before you move forward. We spent the better part of a Saturday setting poles and bracing them perfectly square and plumb. When it came time to set the trusses, we appreciated all the work we had done
This is great advice, however if your concrete is in place it is a moot point. If they are off a small amount they can be manipulated to a degree at that height. I would suggest a laser to get your top band level. You can probably rent one for a small amount. Set it up and get a mark on each post. It does not matter at what height then use your mark and measure up to get a perfect level. Trying to use a level on each section of band will prove to be frustrating when you get to the end. It definitely can be done its just much easier with a laser level.
Old 11-14-2016, 04:24 AM
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We never notch. We do double band because of the snow load here. 2x10 on each side of the 6x6. Also, make sure you do not cut the 6x6 off level with the top of the band. You should be side nailing the rafter into the 6x6 then cutting it flush with the slope of the rafter using a chainsaw. I also add a 1/2" thru bolt, but as stated. We get snow.
Old 11-14-2016, 06:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike Boehler View Post
I live in Podunk USA and even here the building code is enforced pretty strictly. My new pole barn design needed the detail of what you are asking, on a drawing and that drawing stamped by a PE in our state. That design was submitted to the building dept and the permit was issued based on the drawing and the code enforcement guy inspected and it had to look like the drawing. You kinda get the premis here. The engineer has all the liability for the design.

It sounds like your enforcement may be a little lax. Which is great. Less is better as long as you do a reasonable job. My 6x6 posts are not notched. The header was nailed at the proper height and 2x6 pieces where nailed underneath on both sides for additional support.

Not saying it's right but notching up in the air perfectly is challenging. Not to mention if you notch both headers into the 6x6 you take 3" out of a 5-1/2" stick of wood. That 2-1/2" remaining seems pretty skinny but I don't pretend to know the building code. I'm just sayin.
My thoughts exactly. Uplift, lateral stability, wracking..all need to be structurally addressed.

In Florida, it's called "continuous load path". If each truss has 1000 lbs of uplift, that uplift component must be resisted all the way to the ground.
Old 11-14-2016, 07:13 AM
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Who designed your building? All of these questions should have been addressed before you applied for a permit and began construction.
Old 11-14-2016, 05:13 PM
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I designed it using my years as a handyman and helping others. Also researched several designs on the internet and borrowed ideas from building suppliers. Its not that complicated just wanted to get some ideas from you guys not a engineered house I just cant find anywhere details on how the frame is supported other than a few pictures and that video someone posted below. I do have permits and I did get the poles inspected/approved. No shoddy stuff going on here.
Old 11-14-2016, 05:16 PM
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Heres a better picture of where I am now. All poles have been measured and spaced appropriately and level when they were placed.



Thanks for most of your suggestion so far has been most helpful.
Old 11-14-2016, 06:07 PM
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I think what you have in the pic is a good start and nothing wrong there. Don't you have plans that say how your beams are suppose to attach? If you don't then you will need to level and cut all posts after they are set, plumb, and secure. Not sure of the span, but you can probably run a single 2x10 on both sides and through bolt 2-3 in each post. If you don't notch the posts will your span on the trusses still work? Did you make the posts the span or not? If the posts are set for the span, then I would notch the outside beam, but just bolt the inside beam on the face of the post. Again, your building department is going to check that you built to the engineered drawings so that is really what you need to go by.

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