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AWD & Tires

Old 10-15-2016, 10:03 AM
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Default AWD & Tires

I don't have any experience with AWD cars. For you AWD guys, how long does a set of tires last? I got my daughter a Subaru Crosstrek and she has 31K miles and she's going to need new tires in 5K miles. That seems quick. I rotate the tires every 5K miles. Tires are Yokohama Geolanders. These are the original tires.
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:15 AM
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Had a 1995 Explorer with awd and 30K was really pushing it.
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:39 AM
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Oem tires, even on cross-overs, are tuned towards a smooth ride and good braking and turning; and as a result they don't last more than 40,000 miles. Most of the Michelin's that Acura and Lexus, or the Pirelli's on Porsche and Audi use don't go much past 30,000 miles even if you rotate them every 5,000 miles.
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Old 10-15-2016, 01:09 PM
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My WRX had sport tires that wore fast... but I imagine you could get hi mileage tires and do ok with them.

They need to be rotated often to keep wear even. Unmatched tires are not good for the differentials.
And you can't get away with just replacing two tires, need to do all 4.
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Old 10-15-2016, 01:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Jughed View Post
My WRX had sport tires that wore fast... but I imagine you could get hi mileage tires and do ok with them.

They need to be rotated often to keep wear even. Unmatched tires are not good for the differentials.
And you can't get away with just replacing two tires, need to do all 4.
There is a way is to just replace 1-2 tires. I had a flat on an expensive AWD SUV and was worried about differentials so I ordered a used tire online. You can specify how much tread depth you want. I just measured the tread depth of the other tires and orders the same tire with the same tread depth to match. The tire was was discounted accordingly so it only ran about $80 for a tire that would be $300 new. It worked out great but it is a little more of a pain than a flat on part-time 4WD.
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Old 10-15-2016, 01:25 PM
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I just replaced a set of Uniroyal Laredo Cross Countrys that had 58,000 miles on them and still had tread left. I replaced them only because they were 6 years old and starting to show some tiny cracks on the sidewalls. I replaced them with Uniroyal Laredo Cross Countrys. They wear great.
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Old 10-15-2016, 01:28 PM
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ContiProContact. Had them on one of my cars. Did well and lasted. A little bit on the high end of price
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Old 10-15-2016, 03:17 PM
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I think tire makeup and driving habits have far more of an influence over wear rates than awd. I had a Subaru with 55k miles, and still had original tires, with plenty of tread left. Currently I have a Honda Ridgeline with about 40k miles and obviously still original tires.

But if you look at my F250 I had, with winter tires in the winter and all-seasons for the rest of the year, the winters lasted about 30k miles - they were soft rubber and had low treadwear numbers.

I give these examples because I could somewhat rule out driving habits (always me driving) and Honda is 4wd but Subie was AWD.
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Old 10-15-2016, 03:36 PM
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If my wife drove that it would be on it's third set of tires and brakes too
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Old 10-15-2016, 04:23 PM
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There are many variables that would have to be considered such as tire rating, vehicle, driving habits, etc.

IMHO... the main question should simply be:
"do you get more or less miles with AWD vs. 2WD?"
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:38 PM
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53k on the oem michelins on my wife's explorer. I was very pleased.
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:45 PM
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The softer the tires, the stickier they will be, but the faster they will wear. Also, tires marked "treadwear 180" would last half as long as ones marked "treadwear 360". It's basically a percentage of 7,200 miles, so treadwear 100 would last 100% of 7,200 miles, and treadwear 200 would last 200%, or 14,400.

Obviously it's n guarantee, but gives you a relative gauge - moving from 180 to 360 should give you about twice what you got on the 180's.
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:50 PM
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Originally Posted by BlueEdge View Post
There are many variables that would have to be considered such as tire rating, vehicle, driving habits, etc.

IMHO... the main question should simply be:
"do you get more or less miles with AWD vs. 2WD?"
Agreed there are many variables, and I'd guess that AWD would accelerate wear, but the problem with asking the simple question is that AWD could get bad rap and contribute to uninformed decisions.

Just say that I go through a set of tires at 32k. Car was AWD, I blame the AWD, and vow never to buy one again. But if I took those same tires on a 2wd version of that and got 35k, then yes AWD was a factor, but not the main factor.

Generally, anything that has AWD or a limited slip diff is going to see increased tire wear, but someone gettign 32k and someone else getting 55k might be more related to tire hardness and driving habits.
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Old 10-15-2016, 05:56 PM
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I live in the mountains have a honda and a mercedes I buy new tires every two years 20,000 miles .Awd is tough on tires and when driving on slippery surfaces more wear in between traction spots
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Old 10-15-2016, 06:18 PM
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The stock Geolanders on Subarus are notoriously lousy. You would be lucky to get 40K miles out of them.
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Old 10-15-2016, 06:47 PM
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Most all wheel drive vehicles are front wheel drive vehicles. When the front wheels spin, the transfer case sends power through a drive shaft to the rear axle.

In other words, the rear wheels seldom even have any power put to them.

I've sworn no avoid buying vehicles with low profile tires in the future. I have a Lexus with 45 series 18" tires and a Civic SI with 45 series 17" tires. Both eat tires every 25K to 30K--tops--and the tires are very expensive. My Explorer has 60 series 18" tires, and I'm expecting to get 55K miles.
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Old 10-15-2016, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by HardLivin View Post
I don't have any experience with AWD cars. For you AWD guys, how long does a set of tires last? I got my daughter a Subaru Crosstrek and she has 31K miles and she's going to need new tires in 5K miles. That seems quick. I rotate the tires every 5K miles. Tires are Yokohama Geolanders. These are the original tires.
make sure the tread depth in each tire is within the spec from manufacturer. 3/16" difference between tires can destroy an AWD system
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Old 10-15-2016, 07:36 PM
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All new awd vehicles Work on the computer controlled braking system that controls braking to gain traction thru the wheels
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Old 10-15-2016, 07:47 PM
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51k on a subaru forester, probably 35-40% tread remaining
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Old 10-15-2016, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post
Most all wheel drive vehicles are front wheel drive vehicles. When the front wheels spin, the transfer case sends power through a drive shaft to the rear axle.

In other words, the rear wheels seldom even have any power put to them.

I've sworn no avoid buying vehicles with low profile tires in the future. I have a Lexus with 45 series 18" tires and a Civic SI with 45 series 17" tires. Both eat tires every 25K to 30K--tops--and the tires are very expensive. My Explorer has 60 series 18" tires, and I'm expecting to get 55K miles.
I'll not go with profiles lower than 55 or 50 as I want tires with some meat in the sidewalls for helping with those unexpected craters you find sometimes...
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