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School me on geological engineering...

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School me on geological engineering...

Old 10-14-2016, 12:47 PM
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Default School me on geological engineering...

My son is considering majoring in this. Just wondering if anyone knows what opportunities are out there for this career path.
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Old 10-14-2016, 01:01 PM
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What is geological engineering? Maybe geotechnical engineering? I know a couple geologist that did well working for oil exploration companies but never heard them or anyone else refer to them as geological engineers.
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Old 10-14-2016, 01:16 PM
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Great field with a lot of opportunity. That science overlaps with hydrology, environmental concerns, construction, mining, petroleum, renewable energy and more.

Most jobs require traveling

Best of luck to him!
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Old 10-14-2016, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by 54bullwinkle View Post
Great field with a lot of opportunity. That science overlaps with hydrology, environmental concerns, construction, mining, petroleum, renewable energy and more.

Most jobs require traveling

Best of luck to him!
Any states have licensing for Geological Engineering such as a P.E.?

A widely recognized technical degree with a minor(s) in the other areas may likely be more desirable in the job market.
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Old 10-14-2016, 01:50 PM
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From the University of Wisconsin:

Geological engineering offers BS, MS and PhD degrees. The BS degree is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET (http://www.abet.org), which is required to obtain a professional engineering license.

Students pursuing the BS degree are encouraged to obtain a dual major in Geoscience. The BS degree program is set up so that students can obtain a major in Geological Engineering and a BS in Geoscience in a single 125-credit degree program. No extra credits are required to obtain both majors.
Careers in Geological Engineering

With strong skills in geoenvironmental engineering, groundwater technology, hydrogeology, rock mechanics, geotechnical engineering, geophysics and geology. Graduates can expect employment with consulting firms, the petroleum and gas industry, mining companies, federal and state laboratories and agencies, and others. Geological engineers spend part of their working time outdoors enjoying nature. GLE students can opt for a second major in geology, since the credits in geoscience required for the GLE degree satisfy the BS degree in geology.
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Old 10-14-2016, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by wiggreb View Post
My son is considering majoring in this. Just wondering if anyone knows what opportunities are out there for this career path.
What school...check their program.
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Old 10-14-2016, 02:49 PM
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He's at Ole Miss. Was just wondering if anyone might have first hand info about the profession.
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Old 10-14-2016, 03:09 PM
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I don't believe either Louisiana or Mississippi have a licensing board for Geological Engineering they would be able to definitively answer that.

http://www.pepls.state.ms.us/pepls/web.nsf

http://www.lapels.com/

What does your son want to do? And why did he choose this?
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Old 10-14-2016, 03:28 PM
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One thing I would do is go on zip recruiter, of one of the other sites, and try to see if there are jobs, and what kind of places do this sort of work.

The first two years of engineering have a lot of overlap, plus it can be overwhelming for a lot of people.

I would definitely look at work study to gain practical experience before graduation.
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Old 10-14-2016, 04:39 PM
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Great field, lots of opportunity on a number of fronts, not just biz, but also non-profits and gov and academic research, as mentioned previously. If he is interested, he should go for it
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Old 10-14-2016, 07:12 PM
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The majority of geoscientists are employed in the oil and gas industry. When things slow down, or crash (as is the current situation) in this sector, there are loads of highly qualified geoscientists flooding the job market.

Nonetheless, it is remains a worthy career path because of the diversity of opportunities. As mentioned above, those opportunities are not currently as accessible as they are when demand for geos (i.e. - higher oil prices) is up. If he has the math chops, geophysics can open more doors, but the wash out rate for new candidates is high.

A Masters degree will give him a significant level of preference in the job market, no matter the climate.


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Old 10-14-2016, 07:30 PM
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Originally Posted by wiggreb View Post
He's at Ole Miss. Was just wondering if anyone might have first hand info about the profession.
My cousin was a Geology major at the University of Alabama, and he does have P.E. credentials. He started out working in Louisiana and Texas mapping the underground for oil deposits. He got caught up in an oil bust when hundreds and hundreds of geologists were laid off.

Lane went to work in Houston for an Indian PhD in Chemistry doing asbestos abatement. He also later went out on his own working in asbestos, but got one of the rare licenses to be a mold abatement contractor. Come to find out, every commercial structure that's sold in Texas has to have a mold study done on it, and mold inspectors are few and far between.

When the industry went into fracking and started drilling for oil again, geologists without any experience were starting at $100K per year. I would think that many layoffs have taken place throughout the industry now that oil exploration and drilling has been curtailed due to politics.

If your son has the characteristics and drive to become a geologic engineer, he could probably also make it in other forms of engineering that may be in more demand right now. I'd tell him to go into Civil Engineering, which is also involved in geology and moving dirt. And I'd tell him to consider transferring to another university that's got a better engineering program than the University of Mississippi.
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Old 10-14-2016, 07:45 PM
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My college roommate does this. Gets to spec out his own custom work boats, travels all over, kind of like a surveyor on water/marshes. Lots of travel, lots of OT, he loves It though. Works it of a huge company I need upstate ny.
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Old 10-14-2016, 07:54 PM
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I'm in mining. Gel engineers do well.
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Old 10-14-2016, 08:07 PM
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When I was building bridges for the DOT.. We hired them all the time for Vibration monitoring... and pile driving. The G's did all the work to ensure we had enough structural pressure on the concrete piles during installation and they also did all of planning for that (in the plan drawings)... I occasionally had to hire them also for vibration monitoring... caused by sheet pile installation and the same concrete piles.... The mini earthquakes can cause allot of damage to structures nearby....
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:05 AM
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Actually, it's not all that's it's cracked to be...................
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Old 10-15-2016, 11:39 PM
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Definitely go civil with a minor. Being to specific can pigeon hole him
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Old 10-16-2016, 12:40 AM
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Originally Posted by finnedfanatic View Post
Definitely go civil with a minor. Being to specific can pigeon hole him
That's a good suggestion.

Also, If I had it all to do again, I would suggest a 6-8 year college plan, with work-study and additional course work.

It's my experience that it's the extra stuff that you know that will bring you money. For example, I am an electrical engineer by degree, but I also took most of the undergrad comp sci classes, back in the day. Plus, I worked as a car mechanic and lawn equip mechanic (diesel and hydraulics), as well as elect tech. I got my first eng job because my boss said he had not seen an applicant that could fix a lawn mower.

In my opinion, a broad exposure to divergent subject matter, and a real appetite for learning, can add up to a successful career.

Hours, and hours, and hours in the library. Every problem in the book, several times. Then get another book, and do those problems. When I took my control system classes, I had 2-3 EXTRA books for each class for reading and problem sets. At exam time, you are not thinking, it's just writing down answers while your classmates are sweating it out.
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Old 10-16-2016, 06:51 AM
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Be glad he's not majoring in Creative Writing, Dramatic Arts or Women's Studies.
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Old 10-16-2016, 07:03 AM
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Never spent a day in college but do they track how many people are actually working in the field of their degree and how much they earn?
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