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Plumbing Question

Old 10-11-2016, 08:30 AM
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One of the fittings (a picture of which is attached) in the water line which feeds my laundry sink has a sporadic leak. It will drip very slowly (maybe a drop every 30 minutes or so) for a few days, then not drip again for a few weeks. I want to change it, and while I'm fairly handy with wrench, I know almost nothing about plumbing. Is this as simple as just picking up a new fitting and swapping out the old one? Anything tricky about it or other things that I should know about before I start (other than to shut the water off first)?
Thanks in advance.
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Old 10-11-2016, 08:38 AM
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Use a dielectric union because of the dissimilar metals. You will need to cut the copper line, loosen the union and remove the corroded Tee. Replace the Tee, use a threaded nipple to attached the dielectric union to and then solder a new fitting onto the copper line.

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Old 10-11-2016, 09:13 AM
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High probability that some of the other adjacent fittings are corroded and ready to start leaking as well. You should buy several fittings to have on hand when you start breaking the joint down, return them later if not used. As stated above, some disassembly required.
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Old 10-11-2016, 09:15 AM
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Maybe replace T and line to sink with CPVC. much easier to work with.
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Old 10-11-2016, 09:22 AM
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The rest of the galvanized is probably also rotted. Expect the union to be difficult or impossible to get apart. You will have to cut or de-solder the copper.

If it was me, I would cut the three pipes and use shark bite connectors and CPVC or PEX pipe to patch it back together.

You need to do something, that leak in the galvanized T will get bigger at some point.
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Old 10-11-2016, 09:38 AM
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If those fitting are corroded so are the rest. Galvanized pipe only lasts so long and then it begins to rot out from the inside. Anything short of replacing all of it is a patch.
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Old 10-11-2016, 02:59 PM
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Going to be a crap shoot but ... cut off the galvanized where it enters the T If there is enough meat take a die and cut new threads then use a female adapter and Re-pipe with pex or cpvc ...
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Old 10-11-2016, 03:11 PM
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Is the branch of the tee a dead end? Am I seeing a 90 and a plug? Of so, abandon the tee. Unscrew the tee from the left, and screw on a CPVC female adapter, a short piece of CPVC and a shark bite. Is there any play left to right? If so, it might just work. But...as stated, old galvanized??? Good luck. Hard to say where you'll stop with your repair.

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Old 10-11-2016, 03:14 PM
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Pipe diameters are different galv to CU. Galv is IPS. CU is CTS. A sharkbite won't work on the galv. You must use a threaded adapter to get out of the galv.
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Old 10-11-2016, 03:32 PM
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Sounds like more work but it's worth it. Tear it all out! The old galv pipe could be a source of lead, the copper pipe could be a source of lead (depending on age) Put pex pipe in. Very easy, a chimp can do it. Pex is cheap to buy compared to copper.
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Old 10-11-2016, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by bsmit24 View Post
edit

use a dielectric union because of the dissimilar metals. You will need to cut the copper line, loosen the union and remove the corroded tee. Replace the tee, use a threaded nipple to attached the dielectric union to and then solder a new fitting onto the copper line.


^^^
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Old 10-11-2016, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by bsmit24 View Post
Edit

Use a dielectric union because of the dissimilar metals. You will need to cut the copper line, loosen the union and remove the corroded Tee. Replace the Tee, use a threaded nipple to attached the dielectric union to and then solder a new fitting onto the copper line.
Not tough at all, just start the job early enough in the day in case something goes a little south.

X3, This and it's bad because of the corrosion which takes place between dissimilar metals (galvanic corrosion, which the dielectric union prevents), the other galv is fine, though once you look in the pipe, you may want to replace more of it rather than keep it. You'll find plenty of those unions at your big box store.

Google images of galvanized pipe build up and just check yours when you can.
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Old 10-11-2016, 06:51 PM
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either do what bsmit24 said or..... remove the surrounding house from the connection, purchase 5 gallons of 5200, 10 gallons of epoxy, go to Sweden and buy a Johnsenred jainsaw, do some yoga at a goat wedding, rebuild a Viking with 2 stroke Yami outboards, have bluechip author an online dating profile, go to Lake City and search for the recently elusive Rudy of blue, if you find him see if he knows what's up with Sandy,



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Old 10-11-2016, 07:00 PM
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Don't be a Cheapskate. Hire a plumber. It will cost you less in the long run. Looks like a cluster f--k to begin with.
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Old 10-11-2016, 10:35 PM
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Might need to just burn it to the ground.
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Old 10-11-2016, 11:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Tommysmicroskiff View Post
Going to be a crap shoot but ... cut off the galvanized where it enters the T If there is enough meat take a die and cut new threads then use a female adapter and Re-pipe with pex or cpvc ...
Don't do that. Never use a female adapter on steel pipe.
The threads will rust, swell and crack the adapter. Use a galvanized coupler and a male CPVC adapter. I would get rid of all the galvanized you can see but that may just be me.
If you water is OK galvanized will last a long time as long as you separate it from copper.
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Old 10-11-2016, 11:15 PM
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if it was me I would replace all what I could with PEX or CPVC . No dielectric union needed then . If you just want to replace the tee , cut the tee angle crossways with a saws all , see how far you can spread it Unscrew the cut tee pieces off the piping . Screw on a new tee . Attach copper to tee with a gray plastic compression adapter after cutting off the copper male adaptor . Or male cpvc adaptor , cpvc nipple and some type of coupling joining to the copper . The plastic will separate the dissimilar metals . Replace the galv. union and nipple on the third leg . I'm not sold on Sharkbite fittings . Been replacing failing rubber washers , seals and o-rings for 45 years , the Sharkbite rubber o-rings look just like a typical rubber o-ring to me . I won't use them above floor level

Last edited by normsworld; 10-11-2016 at 11:27 PM.
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Old 10-12-2016, 02:28 AM
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I would agree with some other’s “If those fitting are corroded so are the rest”. I ran into the same issue some years back, 1928 house with old pipes. Like you, I knew nothing about plumbing, but figured what the hell and I replaced all galvanized pipes with copper. Really not that difficult once I got the knack of sweating the solider joints. One thing I did learn is to put in lots of shut-off valves, makes life much easier down the road. . Might want to consider PVC, probably a lot cheaper now days.
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Old 10-12-2016, 05:45 AM
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Agree with replacing all of it or as much as possible. PEX pipe is easy to install. You have a choice of crimpers and connectors. I completely re-plumbed under my house with PEX. I found the ratcheting crimpers a better "fit" for limited access applications such as between the joist. Both style crimpers cost around 50 bucks.
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Old 10-12-2016, 08:51 AM
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CPVC seems to be the pipe of choice in new construction around here.
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