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"Above ground" is a moronic way to measure storm surge...

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"Above ground" is a moronic way to measure storm surge...

Old 10-07-2016, 04:02 PM
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Default "Above ground" is a moronic way to measure storm surge...

It's too subjective. The weather people have decided people are too dull to do simple math so their newest phrase is not "above sea level" but above ground.

I kid you not I listened to a woman on the news explain how the 4-8' storm surge was "above ground" and to go outside your door stand in your yard and measure from there.

I know what my level is above sea level. if you live near the ocean I would think you do too. I can handle simple math. Just tell me how the surge relates to sea level damn it.
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Old 10-07-2016, 04:04 PM
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They've never done that in Texas
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Old 10-07-2016, 04:05 PM
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Sea level is not even accurate as it changes too. Most surge heights from NOAA are based on mean lower low water (MLLW), which is the average height of the lowest tide recorded at a tide station each day during the recording period.
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Old 10-07-2016, 04:11 PM
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I had to shake my head at the Paul guy on The Weather Channel.

He actually chastised FPL for being "deceptive" by announcing the number of "customers" that were without electricity instead of the number of people.

Does he really think they have a head count for each meter?

Dumbass.
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Old 10-07-2016, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by ChannelTwo View Post
Sea level is not even accurate as it changes too. Most surge heights from NOAA are based on mean lower low water (MLLW), which is the average height of the lowest tide recorded at a tide station each day during the recording period.
I'm familiar with this method as well and like it. Just give me something I can use math to draw my conclusions from.
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Old 10-07-2016, 04:31 PM
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Was this on the Weather Channel? I just posted on the other thread that I'm done with them. One of them was explaining how rivers flowed downhill due to gravity. Thanks for that keen insight......
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Old 10-07-2016, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by '74 Jailbreak View Post
Was this on the Weather Channel? I just posted on the other thread that I'm done with them. One of them was explaining how rivers flowed downhill due to gravity. Thanks for that keen insight......
No one of the locals.

Can you please explain this gravity phenomenon you reference?

The weather blogs (tropical tidbits and spaghettimodels.com) seem to be more info less fluff.
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Old 10-07-2016, 06:23 PM
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Above ground is the cleanest way to measure it. Most people don't necessarily know their elevation above sea level, but if you tell them they are going to get 8 feet of water in the yard that is easy to understand.
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Old 10-07-2016, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by '74 Jailbreak View Post
Was this on the Weather Channel? I just posted on the other thread that I'm done with them. One of them was explaining how rivers flowed downhill due to gravity. Thanks for that keen insight......
Ask them why some flow north. There are 30
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Old 10-07-2016, 10:36 PM
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If their yard or house is 25ft above sea level. How is that 8ft of storm surge going to affect them?
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Old 10-08-2016, 03:59 AM
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Our of curiosity, who knows how many feet above SeaLevel they are? 52' for me. So with above ground measurement that means it would be one hell of a surge for me to have 5' of water.

Of course I'm in nh so it's more likely to be 5' of snow.
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Old 10-08-2016, 04:05 AM
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If you live within ten miles of the coast I bet 90% of people know their level. Or if you have a mortgage on a house in a flood zone you're required to have an elevation certificate.

I fall under both of those categories and my lowest level is 12.4' above sea level.
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Old 10-08-2016, 05:28 AM
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You do know most viewers are total dumbasses, don't you?
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Old 10-08-2016, 05:43 AM
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i'm a dumbass just ask my wife (and kids)

in fl. 10.5' .
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Old 10-08-2016, 07:28 AM
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Since both elevation certificates and BFE zones are referenced to MSL; a surge warning not referenced to MSL does not make sense.
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Old 10-08-2016, 07:36 AM
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Originally Posted by N2theblue View Post
Above ground is the cleanest way to measure it. Most people don't necessarily know their elevation above sea level, but if you tell them they are going to get 8 feet of water in the yard that is easy to understand.
Agree. And nice to see that we are coming close to running out of things to complain about
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Old 10-08-2016, 07:51 AM
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Originally Posted by N2theblue View Post
Above ground is the cleanest way to measure it. Most people don't necessarily know their elevation above sea level, but if you tell them they are going to get 8 feet of water in the yard that is easy to understand.
And if everyone's ground level isn't the same?
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Old 10-08-2016, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
And if everyone's ground level isn't the same?
Our other house is in a flood zone where most of the surrounding land is 15'- 18' above msl. This house sits on a hill that is 35' above the surrounding areas. I wasn't required to carry flood insurance while paying for it, and still don't now that it's paid off.
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Old 10-08-2016, 08:07 AM
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They made a giant ruler so we would know what 4 , 6 and 8 feet was.
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Old 10-08-2016, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
And if everyone's ground level isn't the same?
The maps take that into account. That's the whole point of saying "above ground" (minor one foot variations in your yard excepted)
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