Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > Dockside Chat
Reload this Page >

Why Addiction Should Not Be Classified As A Disease

Notices

Why Addiction Should Not Be Classified As A Disease

Old 06-07-2016, 12:36 PM
  #1  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 4,156
Likes: 0
Received 285 Likes on 167 Posts
Default Why Addiction Should Not Be Classified As A Disease

http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...science-stigma

"There is evidence willpower can be crucial in beating addiction, yet it doesn't work for cancer, pneumonia or malaria."

"We are starting to recognize addiction as a consequence of social ills rather than individual flaws."

Old 06-07-2016, 01:18 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Hanahan, SC
Posts: 113
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

I can't quote the sources because it was a long time ago when they started treating it like a disease. But, the quote I remember was, "If you treat it as if it is a disease then it is treatable, if you treat it as a mental illness then it is much harder to treat." It clearly was not considered a disease many years ago, but was approached as one to aid in treatment.
Old 06-07-2016, 01:41 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 620
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

People with cancer die every day because they no longer have the will to continue with treatment. So yes, willpower does play a crucial role in treatment of many diseases. Alcohol withdrawals have severe and sometimes deadly results. While you can say they did it to themselves, they also have no control over the physical effects that result when they try to quit.
Old 06-07-2016, 01:43 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 4,064
Received 85 Likes on 50 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by straps57 View Post
People with cancer die every day because they no longer have the will to continue with treatment. So yes, willpower does play a crucial role in treatment of many diseases. Alcohol withdrawals have severe and sometimes deadly results. While you can say they did it to themselves, they also have no control over the physical effects that result when they try to quit.
Old 06-07-2016, 01:46 PM
  #5  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: coral gables, florida
Posts: 5,286
Received 486 Likes on 271 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Captain Twice Screwed View Post
http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...science-stigma

"There is evidence willpower can be crucial in beating addiction, yet it doesn't work for cancer, pneumonia or malaria."

"We are starting to recognize addiction as a consequence of social ills rather than individual flaws."

interesting. what is your viewpoint on the subject?
Old 06-07-2016, 01:52 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 272
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Give someone a crutch and they will lean on it. Take it away and they will learn to walk on their own.

Excuses lead to enabling.
Old 06-07-2016, 01:52 PM
  #7  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,787
Likes: 0
Received 693 Likes on 354 Posts
Default

I don't think willpower helps you beat addiction, I think it helps you keep it at bay.
Old 06-07-2016, 01:58 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,167
Likes: 0
Received 194 Likes on 103 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by welch1972 View Post
Give someone a crutch and they will lean on it. Take it away and they will learn to walk on their own.

Excuses lead to enabling.
Nonsense.
Old 06-07-2016, 02:03 PM
  #9  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 2,787
Likes: 0
Received 693 Likes on 354 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by welch1972 View Post
Give someone a crutch and they will lean on it. Take it away and they will learn to walk on their own.

Excuses lead to enabling.
I see someone overheard their Grandpa when they were a kid
Old 06-07-2016, 02:04 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Suffolk, Va.
Posts: 17,546
Likes: 0
Received 2,059 Likes on 1,044 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by straps57 View Post
People with cancer die every day because they no longer have the will to continue with treatment. So yes, willpower does play a crucial role in treatment of many diseases. Alcohol withdrawals have severe and sometimes deadly results. While you can say they did it to themselves, they also have no control over the physical effects that result when they try to quit.
You have that wrong. Treat it as an addiction and its not covered by insurance. Treat it as a diseases and it becomes big $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. If think about it most people that are addicted to drugs and alcohol have no money. So there is no money in providing them treatment. The minute it became a disease treatment places popped up everywhere.
Old 06-07-2016, 02:06 PM
  #11  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Houston, TX & FL Gulf Coast
Posts: 403
Received 127 Likes on 69 Posts
Default

Calling addiction a disease seems to only absolve the individual of any responsibility. Until responsibility is rightfully owned, there will not be a positive solution.
Old 06-07-2016, 03:01 PM
  #12  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Out west
Posts: 3,323
Likes: 0
Received 582 Likes on 287 Posts
Default

These word games are used by a society struggling with reality.

If addiction is a disease, then life is a disease. Both addiction and life's problems cause physical issues.

The consequences of addiction cause disease states. The physical aspects of withdrawal are certainly a disease state.

Just as the physical consequences of starvation result in a disease state. Or vitamin deficiency, or sleep deprivation.

Labeling "addiction" as a disease relieves the addict of responsibility for their behaviors. This cannot be useful to their resolution of their problems. As others have noted, it allows for $$$$$$ to be spent/wasted on unsuccessful recovery efforts.

Addicts are inevitably liars. There is universal consensus of this. Is being a liar a disease?? A symptom of a disease? What's the cure for lying?
Old 06-07-2016, 05:18 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Newport Beach, CA. USA
Posts: 1,503
Received 238 Likes on 145 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by dssmith View Post
these word games are used by a society struggling with reality.

If addiction is a disease, then life is a disease. Both addiction and life's problems cause physical issues.

The consequences of addiction cause disease states. The physical aspects of withdrawal are certainly a disease state.

Just as the physical consequences of starvation result in a disease state. Or vitamin deficiency, or sleep deprivation.

Labeling "addiction" as a disease relieves the addict of responsibility for their behaviors. This cannot be useful to their resolution of their problems. As others have noted, it allows for $$$$$$ to be spent/wasted on unsuccessful recovery efforts.

Addicts are inevitably liars. There is universal consensus of this. Is being a liar a disease?? A symptom of a disease? What's the cure for lying?
x1000
Old 06-07-2016, 06:12 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
DJWILLIAMS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Eastern, NC
Posts: 5,124
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Ok then define addiction vs dependent
Old 06-07-2016, 06:18 PM
  #15  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Brooklyn, NY (Bay Ridge)
Posts: 14,769
Received 581 Likes on 312 Posts
Default

Actions have consequences and so does lack of will power.

Equating the lack of will power to cancer deaths is so dopey it's funny.
Old 06-07-2016, 06:22 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,402
Likes: 0
Received 62 Likes on 41 Posts
Default

we need to classify lack of will power as a disease.
Old 06-08-2016, 04:36 AM
  #17  
jwb
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: connecticut
Posts: 1,798
Likes: 0
Received 104 Likes on 69 Posts
Default

I get the definite impression some of you guys have not seen addiction up close, over a period of time, in a loved one.
It's ugly, messy and not simple or black and white.
And it can happen to people of all types.
Old 06-08-2016, 04:46 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: North Palm Beach, FL
Posts: 8,516
Likes: 0
Received 1,352 Likes on 734 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by welch1972 View Post
Give someone a crutch and they will lean on it. Take it away and they will learn to walk on their own.

Excuses lead to enabling.
When I was in elementary school had a teacher who suffered polio as a child. Take his crutches away and he falls down. Sound bites are great, except when they're not.

Originally Posted by dssmith View Post
These word games are used by a society struggling with reality.

If addiction is a disease, then life is a disease. Both addiction and life's problems cause physical issues.

The consequences of addiction cause disease states. The physical aspects of withdrawal are certainly a disease state.

Just as the physical consequences of starvation result in a disease state. Or vitamin deficiency, or sleep deprivation.

Labeling "addiction" as a disease relieves the addict of responsibility for their behaviors. This cannot be useful to their resolution of their problems. As others have noted, it allows for $$$$$$ to be spent/wasted on unsuccessful recovery efforts.

Addicts are inevitably liars. There is universal consensus of this. Is being a liar a disease?? A symptom of a disease? What's the cure for lying?
Once the body is gravely affected by starvation or vitamin deficiency or whatever, what do you do, tell them to eat a sandwich and send them packing? Or do you treat them until they are healed?
Old 06-08-2016, 05:25 AM
  #19  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 4,156
Likes: 0
Received 285 Likes on 167 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by jwb View Post
I get the definite impression some of you guys have not seen addiction up close, over a period of time, in a loved one.
It's ugly, messy and not simple or black and white.
And it can happen to people of all types.
The point of the article is not to remove empathy but how to treat addition. If you put in the mind of the addict that it is a chronic disease much of the will to get above it is eliminated and replaced with "fate".

Apart from the above I'm sure you are correct and that can change someone's perspective significantly.
Old 06-08-2016, 05:58 AM
  #20  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: SE FL
Posts: 1,009
Received 67 Likes on 50 Posts
Default

I don't think some of you realize this, but calling alcoholism a disease is nothing new. And no, I am not a member of AA, nor an alcoholic.

en_bigbook_foreworddoctorsopinion.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Duncan_Silkworth

Last edited by NoWake200; 06-08-2016 at 06:11 AM.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.