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Anonymous’ cyberwarfare against ISIS

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Anonymous’ cyberwarfare against ISIS

Old 11-17-2015, 05:43 PM
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Default Anonymous’ cyberwarfare against ISIS

I had never heard of Anonymous cyberwarfare until I happened across this report. Interesting that an enemy can be attacked through computer systems.

http://www.computerworld.com/article...king-isis.html
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Old 11-17-2015, 06:18 PM
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If it can be done, these guys and gals can do it. Do a little research on them!
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Old 11-17-2015, 06:32 PM
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They are the real deal...
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Old 11-17-2015, 07:24 PM
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Using computer hacking against the terrorists. I love it. I always wondered why the smart hackers haven't used their superior knowledge for good.
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Old 11-17-2015, 07:37 PM
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I can turn on a computer. And go on THT.
Where do I sign up and help?
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Old 11-17-2015, 07:47 PM
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Originally Posted by myyellas2k View Post
I can turn on a computer. And go on THT.
Where do I sign up and help?
Anonymous has already hacked your computer and they are using it as part of their network. So, you are helping. Whether you like it or not.

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Old 11-17-2015, 08:22 PM
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Anonymous has usually 2 sides, the people that just like to hang out and do good. Then there's the awfully strange ones, into things even weird people them selves will sit there scratching their head at. But of course since they are what they're called, Anonymous, we don't know who is who.
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Old 11-17-2015, 09:02 PM
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These guys are "good" in the sense of being good at what they do. Don't lose sight of the fact that you can just as easily have a tiger by the tail if they decide to turn their sights back on us in the future. Be careful what you wish for.
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Old 11-17-2015, 10:15 PM
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Anonymous stand for what they perceive to be right/wrong regardless of public opinion. That is more than I can say for nearly any gov, ours included. Just hope we don't fall on their bad side, because they will not hesitate. There is a reason the Guy Fawkes mask is their symbol.
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Old 11-18-2015, 06:01 AM
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Originally Posted by RussH View Post
I had never heard of Anonymous cyberwarfare until I happened across this report. Interesting that an enemy can be attacked through computer systems.

http://www.computerworld.com/article...king-isis.html
They can do as much bad as they can do good. Power can be easily abused.
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Old 11-18-2015, 07:39 AM
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For clarification, Anonymous is a collective hacking group. With no central authority, their efforts can be unfocused or conflicting. They typically attack companies they don't like as well as CP or terrorist groups. They're not angels, but there are worse out there.

Cyberwarfare was around back in WWII era, so it's nothing new. What has changed is its prevalence. For instance, if China wants to take down our electrical grid, it wouldn't be difficult for them.
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Old 11-18-2015, 08:45 AM
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Read up on stuxnet, a nation-sponsored virus that infected the programmable logic controllers on centrifuges. These are very sensitive pieces of equipment. It varied the speed of the motors outside their operating parameters and caused premature failure of the centrifuges at Iran's Natanz nuclear facility in an attempt to stall their nuclear program. The centrifuges were used to enrich uranium.
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Old 11-18-2015, 01:57 PM
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Originally Posted by jobowker View Post
Read up on stuxnet, a nation-sponsored virus that infected the programmable logic controllers on centrifuges. These are very sensitive pieces of equipment. It varied the speed of the motors outside their operating parameters and caused premature failure of the centrifuges at Iran's Natanz nuclear facility in an attempt to stall their nuclear program. The centrifuges were used to enrich uranium.
The beauty of stuxnet was that while it caused the centrifuges to spin up higher than normal, then lower than normal, then higher again, all of the gauges read that they were running normally. Even if you suspected something were wrong, when you searched the computer for a virus, it wouldn't find anything because the virus hid itself from any detection via a rootkit.
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Old 11-18-2015, 02:11 PM
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Not the 72 virgins ISIS was expecting....
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Old 11-18-2015, 02:43 PM
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The enemy of my enemy is my friend...
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Old 11-18-2015, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by mitchk View Post
Not the 72 virgins ISIS was expecting....
Very clever!
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Old 11-18-2015, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by tcpip95 View Post
The beauty of stuxnet was that while it caused the centrifuges to spin up higher than normal, then lower than normal, then higher again, all of the gauges read that they were running normally. Even if you suspected something were wrong, when you searched the computer for a virus, it wouldn't find anything because the virus hid itself from any detection via a rootkit.
And with that said, how secure are our nukes from a hack like this?

And I'm now talking about a a movie called War Games either.......This is real world, right here.
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Old 11-18-2015, 03:12 PM
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http://thehackernews.com/2015/11/ano...cker-isis.html
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Old 11-18-2015, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Seefood Man View Post
And with that said, how secure are our nukes from a hack like this?

And I'm now talking about a a movie called War Games either.......This is real world, right here.
Real world is REAL scary. Our power grid uses SCADA - which is essentially what is/was used in Iran with stuxnet. The difference is that stuxnet was targeted specifically for very special components running specific software (Siemens Step7) that it turns out the Iranians just happened to be using. It would be trivial for someone who wanted to do us harm to do the same thing. An air-gap network infrastructure - where the SCADA systems are physically disconnected from the Internet - can be easily defeated if people do not follow information security rules. Many critical systems in manufacturing will use old purpose-built software to run machinery or controllers. These operating systems have been long discontinued (i.e Windows XP, Windows 2000), so there are no more security patches to vulnerabilities, but the companies cannot upgrade them without significant time and cost. So the CFO says "just continue using what we have now".

One of the most common ways to deliver a virus is to simply place it on a usb stick, and leave them laying around, or hand them out at events. As soon as you plug it in, the virus is in.

Now imagine something that takes down our power grid for a couple of weeks....

REAL SCARY.
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Old 11-18-2015, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Seefood Man View Post
And with that said, how secure are our nukes from a hack like this?

And I'm now talking about a a movie called War Games either.......This is real world, right here.
The tech that runs the nukes is old and not on a network.
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