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Flooring for new construction

Old 09-10-2015, 07:27 PM
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Default Flooring for new construction

New home under construction. 1-2 weeks away from sheetrock. Having a hard time deciding on floors.

Our choices are:

Wood Look porcelain tile

Laminate

LVT plank (flooring store is pushing Karndean brand)


We live in a very humid climate with chance of storms every year. Although we should never flood we can lose electricity for 1-2 weeks for major storms. We also have 2 young kids and a dog. Looking for something that is good looking, durable, but easy to replace when it goes out of style.

Our last two homes had tile. We were decently happy with it. I think porcelain should be better than the ceramic we had as it's tougher and if nicked shouldn't show as much.

In theory the LVT plank sounds great. I just question it's durability.

Due to budget we don't really have any other options.

Any input?

Gary
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Old 09-10-2015, 07:30 PM
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Porcelain tile gets my vote.
Why did you post this in the trading dock?

Last edited by Dillard88; 09-10-2015 at 07:59 PM.
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Old 09-10-2015, 07:52 PM
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porcelain is a no brainer out of those three choices, practically indestructible compared to the other two. BTW I am a licensed FL GC.
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Old 09-11-2015, 03:37 AM
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I am in the business. I would hands down go with porcelain wood look plank tile. Cross laminate off the list due to moisture and humidity. Even lvp, believe it or not, can be very finicky. Have seen seems separate. It also scratches pretty easily and must be installed on a perfectly prepped floor or the imperfections can show through the plank. You will more than likely pay more up front for the tile, but in the long run its well worth it. Also, pay extra for a grout boost/ maximizer. This is a liquid product that is mixed with the grout during the grout installation to help prevent grout staining. It's not bulletproof, but helps tremendously.
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Old 09-11-2015, 09:23 AM
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Tile unless you really do like to do new flooring on a regular basis. If you don't care about the cost of removal and replacement then do the tile anyway.
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Old 09-11-2015, 09:34 AM
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we are going with marble tile ($1.99 per sq ft) and a plank mahogany locking floor (3.00 per ft)....looked at both in a demo home and it looked great.
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Old 09-11-2015, 09:56 AM
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We have been looking at the LVT stuff for our farmhouse...buddy of mine has been with Shaw for years and was telling me about their product. He said they take every manufacturer (well-known) and run tests and the Shaw stuff out lasts (cycle counts) the nearest competitor by 2-2.5x the cycles/loads.

He did say some of the competitors seams (where it locks together) can break fairly easily because there are voids/no "meat" where they lock together in places.

I have had 3 samples of the line below their "Premio" line outside on our patio in rain/humidity/heat, etc for 3 weeks and they still look brand new.
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:01 AM
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I would agree that tile is tough to beat. But it is noisy so that's something to think about. Acoustically, the more hard surfaces you have the louder the house will be (as in you can hear what goes on in every room) Personally, I don't like houses that sound like a boom box so I won't ever do tile throughout. My old house was an open floor plan and had a mix of tile and hardwoods and I hated that shit.

I have put a lot of LVT plank in commercial applications and have had no durability issues and really not had any issues due to moisture unless it has been installed on a green slab. Now this is with a commercial grade product so the wear and tear on it vs a residential grade might be different.
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:25 AM
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Tile, I don't understand the love for LVT. I am in the construction business and can't tell you how much money I have spent replacing LVT that was scratched during construction and had to be replaced. Also doesn't look good unless you wax it. Go with the tile.
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Old 09-11-2015, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by jkapl001 View Post
Tile, I don't understand the love for LVT. I am in the construction business and can't tell you how much money I have spent replacing LVT that was scratched during construction and had to be replaced. Also doesn't look good unless you wax it. Go with the tile.
Not sure what product that was used, but I'm in an office where field guys (construction) and mechanics come in/out throughout the day and it looks pretty damn good still (been one year, though)
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Old 09-11-2015, 12:47 PM
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We switched to a rough travertine tile with this house and never looked back. We were initially worried about its porous nature and how well it would hold up to our dog herd but we have been very impressed with the overall durability of the stone. It does cost a bit more but it looks stunning.

The best part for us is the rough cut doesn't slip and slide like traditional tile when the feet are wet. I also like the fact that it is a truly natural product and replacing tiles even 20 years down the road will be easy.

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Old 09-11-2015, 02:01 PM
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I really like the look of most floors made today. There is a lot about a tile floor that I like except where you have a run of say 40 feet you get tiny expansion cracks due to the natural expansion of the material with temperature changes...............oh well!!!
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Old 09-11-2015, 02:23 PM
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Originally Posted by jkapl001 View Post
Tile, I don't understand the love for LVT. I am in the construction business and can't tell you how much money I have spent replacing LVT that was scratched during construction and had to be replaced. Also doesn't look good unless you wax it. Go with the tile.
Aint that the truth!!

Don't rule out bamboo flooring from a liquidator
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Old 09-11-2015, 02:49 PM
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Its not the tile that's the problem its the grout joints , no matter how much you seal them they will stain .
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Old 09-11-2015, 02:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Gmack View Post
New home under construction. 1-2 weeks away from sheetrock. Having a hard time deciding on floors.

Any input?

Gary
brick
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Old 09-11-2015, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by cgrand View Post
brick
Chris, what's material and labor going for. Here its 7.50 sf
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Old 09-11-2015, 03:02 PM
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4" face brick is about $400/cube (505 units)
we always get lump sum labor pricing so i'm not sure about that
i am always amazed though how cheap masonry is relatively speaking

i always estimate $1.05 per brick face and it usually comes out about right
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Old 09-12-2015, 06:43 AM
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Slab or wood substrate? This is the first issue to consider.
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Old 09-12-2015, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Slab or wood substrate? This is the first issue to consider.
It's on a slab.

Couple pictures of the house. Monday they will be starting on solid plywood sheathing the interior and hopefully by the end of the week hanging sheet rock.
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Old 09-12-2015, 05:59 PM
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We see very little vinyl flooring in south Florida, all tile or carpet. Problem with tile, it gets dated and is a bitch to take up. I'm also seeing a lot of loose tile after several years. I attribute this to crappy concrete made from fly ash and extenders. Crap shrinks as it cures more than real concrete, tiles pop loose because they don't shrink any.

We had quality vinyl in Georgia, and it was pretty nice. Durable, easy to walk on, easy to clean.

Whatever you do, don't put wood over a slab.
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