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Bed Bug Detection Dogs

Old 09-09-2015, 09:18 AM
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Default Bed Bug Detection Dogs

Does any one have experience with them? I am looking to Start a business in Bed Bug Detection and Just wanted to know if any one had any pointers from the Field anything they liked or disliked. My basic Business model is to cater to hotels and Nursing homes to mark which rooms have bed bugs and which don't to save on extermination costs. Part of the Plan will look completely Discrete while at hotels to not worry the costumers. Any advise will help I am getting a little worried about walking away from a steady pay check but I will never have a better situation to do it then now and It should open a lot more possibilities for me.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:38 AM
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http://inthesharktank.com/2012/09/bu...gs-shark-tank/
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Old 09-09-2015, 10:01 AM
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When bed bugs issue first came back into news a few years ago, I thought I had perfect plan. Put the wife and lazy beagle dog to work doing what you are thinking. Get them both working, what a deal was my thought.

Then I got to looking to the reality, big cost in training the dog for that task, cleaning the dog and wife up after a day of hunting bed bugs so they don't bring them into the house was most of the work. Ended up that the cost of all the work in training and decontamination the business plan didn't pay off as easily as I expected.

Now days there are lots of people in this business and some of them big companies that include getting rid of the bugs after they are located. To only be finding them is now a small part of the business.

Anyway, just my experience in what sound like good way to get wife and lazy dog working and paying their way.

Good luck.
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Old 09-09-2015, 10:49 AM
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I think a company specializing in getting rid of them would work better. Especially if you're in an area where its rampant. No other kind of pest control, just bedbugs. Heat is the most effective and they make units that sit outside and pump heat in through ducts. You could still get the dog to sweep before and after.
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Old 09-09-2015, 10:53 AM
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what about a mobile detection lab - I mean couldn't some tweezers for a small bed sample and a portable or USB microscope work?

Idea: in todays digital world, take a picture with your USB microscope of the bed begs on your mobile computer / tablet and email or print it in front of them - that visual confirmation will change some minds.Not sure if feasible, depends on how powerful of microscope you need?
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by mskin314 View Post
what about a mobile detection lab - I mean couldn't some tweezers for a small bed sample and a portable or USB microscope work?

Idea: in todays digital world, take a picture with your USB microscope of the bed begs on your mobile computer / tablet and email or print it in front of them - that visual confirmation will change some minds.Not sure if feasible, depends on how powerful of microscope you need?
I could add that Bed bug detection dogs are 90+% Percent accurate finding bed bugs visually is very difficult with out a dog.
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by monobill View Post
When bed bugs issue first came back into news a few years ago, I thought I had perfect plan. Put the wife and lazy beagle dog to work doing what you are thinking. Get them both working, what a deal was my thought.

Then I got to looking to the reality, big cost in training the dog for that task, cleaning the dog and wife up after a day of hunting bed bugs so they don't bring them into the house was most of the work. Ended up that the cost of all the work in training and decontamination the business plan didn't pay off as easily as I expected.

Now days there are lots of people in this business and some of them big companies that include getting rid of the bugs after they are located. To only be finding them is now a small part of the business.

Anyway, just my experience in what sound like good way to get wife and lazy dog working and paying their way.

Good luck.
I will be Buying my first dog which is quite pricey this comes with a week long training program for my self and conections into the buisness.

I was planning on staying only in the detection field since that way I am unbias about detecting bed bugs. At least at first.
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:11 AM
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Several of the pest control companies in my area offer dogs for detection and then they will remove the bugs. Nursing homes, hotels, and multi-family will already have an existing contract with a pest control company so it may be a lot tougher finding work than you expect. But if you can make it work, that sounds like a great job to have. I would also consider some type of E&O insurance...ok I would not do this type of work without it. Especially hearing that dogs are 90% accurate, what happens with the 10% of instances they are wrong? You miss one hotel room, an infestation spreads, entire hotel has to shut down for three days to treat....or you miss some old lady's bed and she gets eaten up. Her wounds get infected and she dies. Not trying to be dramatic but you need E&O. Also commercial businesses or apartment communities (you are considering apartments I hope) will almost always require General Liability of over a million for any person or company working on their property so there is an additional cost there.
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:15 AM
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All that said it makes me wonder if you could sub-contract for a pest control company? Or multiple companies. They have the pest control contract at nursing home ABC but don't have a dog. They send you in and pay you a flat rate with a small bonus for each confirmed occurrence. Is that an option?
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:35 AM
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Why cant you just flip up a mattress and check for the little
Basters?
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:57 AM
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From most of the people I have talked to I would do a lot of sub contracting at a flat rate. A lot of the bigger companies like to offer the service but not pay techs to handle and up keep the dogs. This is part of why I am buying a certified dog to start and from a reputable trainer who has connections in the field. I will plan on having plenty of Insurance and will look into what I can and can't say as to assuring the customers.
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Old 09-09-2015, 02:11 PM
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I don't have the time to explain all the particulars right now, but know you must train the dog daily. You must keep live bed bugs for the dog to detect. You must have a human feeding station for your BB's. They need to feed on a LIVE mammal. The dog , and more importantly you need ongoing training from the dog trainer. And know that all trainers are not alike. Some put out very good detection dogs, some not so much. I have had termite detection dogs in the past and know of what I speak. I am an entomologist by trade with a top 100 pest management firm and we do not use dogs for a lot of different reasons. A good dog and handler are a great tool, but please think long and hard before getting into this. PM me if you want and I will give you my phone number if you want to discuss it further. I am in the keys at the moment !
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Old 09-09-2015, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Sneaky Snooker View Post
I don't have the time to explain all the particulars right now, but know you must train the dog daily. You must keep live bed bugs for the dog to detect. You must have a human feeding station for your BB's. They need to feed on a LIVE mammal. The dog , and more importantly you need ongoing training from the dog trainer. And know that all trainers are not alike. Some put out very good detection dogs, some not so much. I have had termite detection dogs in the past and know of what I speak. I am an entomologist by trade with a top 100 pest management firm and we do not use dogs for a lot of different reasons. A good dog and handler are a great tool, but please think long and hard before getting into this. PM me if you want and I will give you my phone number if you want to discuss it further. I am in the keys at the moment !
I understand about the training and am in the process of reviewing the different trainers. My plan with the live bed bugs was to buy them at first but also to capture a few at the infested houses they can live a few weeks with out eating.
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Old 09-09-2015, 07:28 PM
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I read some where that you could dust down a large glass bowl with talcum powder, place a chunk of dry ice in the center and place the bowel where you suspect them. If they're there they'll be attracted to the dry ice, jump in the bowel and not be able to escape because of the powder. The dry ice attracts them because it releases CO2 and bed bugs think that the carbon dioxide in the exhalation of a mammal.
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