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Old 09-09-2015, 09:01 AM
  #41  
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I only took a couple AP classes, but none of them had any serious homework. Occasionally I'd have to stay in the lab to finish some stuff or go back to use their equipment (mechanical engineering software, for example) that I didn't have at home. Most of that was because I procrastinated or messed around while I was in class.

3 years of Honors physics, and not once can I remember having any homework. We were even allowed to prep for tests in the class, because the class consisted of lab time which would be forfeited for the test day. Our teacher would give us extra credit if we did anything extra at home but it was all voluntary and usually only the ones struggling would do it to keep their grade up.

School teaches to the lowest average / common denominator in the class, and homework is a waste of time. I get that it can help involve the parents in teaching, but only with parents who want to do that. Kids who don't have support can get overwhelmed, give up, and just generally fall behind. It's a terrible method if you ask me.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:05 AM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Ronn Burgandy View Post
We indoctrinate our children at an exceptionally young age, all in the name of getting them educated enough to "work".
K-12 school is designed to beat the life out of you and turn you into a another clone - an apathetic and well behaved little worker drone.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by SEATOAD View Post
K-12 school is designed to beat the life out of you and turn you into a another clone - an apathetic and well behaved little worker drone.
Precisely.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Ronn Burgandy View Post
Not sure where I even intimated that I'd prefer the life of human children 300,000 years ago, nonetheless, I stand by what I wrote. We indoctrinate our children at an exceptionally young age, all in the name of getting them educated enough to "work". During their "sentences", we don't teach them to live, we don't teach them to love, we don't teach them to enjoy life...we teach them to work. To work.

300,000 years ago at least we were teaching them how to survive. Now? Nope.

To steal JD's thunder, I do so enjoy how this thread has become the opportunity to proclaim "I'm great" or "my kids are great".
I find your views flawed.

survival is work- you are going to refute that?

"work" nowadays is just different. back then you had to "work" the fields, "work" the hunts. times have changed - but work, one way or another, has always been there.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:13 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by Ronn Burgandy View Post
... We indoctrinate our children at an exceptionally young age, all in the name of getting them educated enough to "work". During their "sentences", we don't teach them to live, we don't teach them to love, we don't teach them to enjoy life...we teach them to work. To work.

....
It takes work to master subject matter.
It isn't the school's place to teach them to love, live or enjoy life.
Nor is it their place to provide political indoctrination or value-specific lessons.

I don't know what is enough homework, but I do know that parents can opt out on behalf of their kids.
Sounds like you would do well home schooling.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:14 AM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by LI32 View Post
Welcome to education in America for the 21st Century.
Our kids HS experience is somewhat similar - if you are in the AP & honors program it is expected there will be 25-30 hours of homework per week (usually 3.5-4.5 hours Mon - Thu + 10-12 hours for Fri - Sun). In addition they spend seven (7) 46 minute periods in class or lab and do afterschool activities from 3-5:30 pm - which gives them 50 minutes for lunch and 50 minutes after classes end to do some of their homework. A typical school day starts at 7:30 am and ends around 9:30 pm + another almost full day between Saturday and Sunday.
It is a full time job+.
^^^This is my 6th graders experience.
Smart, organized and efficient worker.
Last year she was in bed by 8pm.
This year, up til 10 or 11 every night with maybe one night a week til midnight.
plus 6 to 8 hours on the weekends so far.
4 minutes between classes and 25 minutes for lunch.

I think in time, the efficiency will improve, meaning she will grasp that perfection is not the goal, learning is.

Me. - I had to get the janitor to cut the lock off my locker (if I could remember where it was) at the end of the year so I could return my unused books - I was busy riding my bike around and starting fires .

Very different.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by mskin314 View Post
I find your views flawed.

That's quite alright by me.

survival is work- you are going to refute that?

No. Haven't yet.

"work" nowadays is just different. back then you had to "work" the fields, "work" the hunts. times have changed - but work, one way or another, has always been there.
You don't understand my point. That's okay. Not everyone can or will.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by chrispnet View Post
It takes work to master subject matter.
It isn't the school's place to teach them to love, live or enjoy life.
Nor is it their place to provide political indoctrination or value-specific lessons.
I agree, and I'm not saying anything about what the "schools" job is. I'm merely commenting on how humans have evolved as I think its kinda flawed. We created schools, yes? For what? Well, to educate our children. Educate them to do what? Work.

Why didn't humans evolve into beings that valued life over work, rather than work over life? Minimal work and maximal life enjoyment (live, love, life experience). Seems kinda stupid that we went in the direction we did. Like the old saying says...no one ever says, while on their deathbed "I wish I had more time to work...."
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Ronn Burgandy View Post
.... We created schools, yes? For what? Well, to educate our children. Educate them to do what? Work.

Maybe…some might see it a little more positively.
We created schools to share knowledge and enlightenment.
We created schools to share the discoveries that preceded us…so that we aren't constantly reinventing the wheel.
We need to share that knowledge so that the species can achieve…accomplish…create…evolve…and eventually perhaps become closer to the paradigm you describe.
Achievement, at any endeavor, including that one, requires work.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Ronn Burgandy View Post
You don't understand my point. That's okay. Not everyone can or will.
Oh I get your point

But

You are just failing to realize that most humans (kids) aren't cut out to be the life loving, thrill seeking humans you envision. Most don't have the capacity to do it either.

Hierarchical order and schooling/teaching is necessary and has always been around, and is applicable to many more species then homo sapiens. In Ronn's world it seems, everyone would be equal, holding hands while watching butterflies.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by chrispnet View Post
Maybe…some might see it a little more positively.
We created schools to share knowledge and enlightenment.
We created schools to share the discoveries that preceded us…so that we aren't constantly reinventing the wheel.
We need to share that knowledge so that the species can achieve…accomplish…create…evolve…and eventually perhaps become closer to the paradigm you describe.
Achievement, at any endeavor, including that one, requires work.
There he is, he's back!
x2
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by mskin314 View Post
... In Ronn's world it seems, everyone would be equal, holding hands while watching butterflies.
I couldn't disagree more.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by chrispnet View Post
Maybe…some might see it a little more positively.
We created schools to share knowledge and enlightenment.
We created schools to share the discoveries that preceded us…so that we aren't constantly reinventing the wheel.
We need to share that knowledge so that the species can achieve…accomplish…create…evolve…and eventually perhaps become closer to the paradigm you describe.
Achievement, at any endeavor, including that one, requires work.
I'm not arguing for us to cease education. I understand that education, on some level, is necessary for advancement. I just feel that we've really, as a species, screwed it up pretty badly. Our priorities are seriously f'd. Read some of the thread here...guys bragging about their kids taking AP courses. Who the hell cares? You know what that gets them in their 20's and 30's and so on? Nothing. Literally nothing. 99/100 of those courses won't even apply to what they end up doing for "work". And we, as parents, "brag" about this. Woo hoo! My kid accomplished a shitload of nothing! Yay for him/her!

The scary part is, those kids will/did get into college, and they'll "work" hard there too. And when they get out, they'll get an entry level job, where they'll "work" long hours throughout their 20's and 30's (the prime of their lives), all so they can hope to someday retire from working so much and start to "enjoy life".

Why not enjoy life all along? Why don't we teach our kids to do that?
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:42 AM
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I'm sure you will teach yours as I taught mine.
They aren't mutually exclusive.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by mskin314 View Post
Oh I get your point

But

You are just failing to realize that most humans (kids) aren't cut out to be the life loving, thrill seeking humans you envision. Most don't have the capacity to do it either.

Hierarchical order and schooling/teaching is necessary and has always been around, and is applicable to many more species then homo sapiens. In Ronn's world it seems, everyone would be equal, holding hands while watching butterflies.
As I said, you don't/can't understand. You can stop trying, as it will only further frustrate you.

One point we agree on though...most human kids aren't cut out to be life loving...because we teach them precisely the opposite.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by chrispnet View Post
I'm sure you will teach yours as I taught mine.
They aren't mutually exclusive.


I'm aiming at the collective!
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:43 AM
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My oldest son is in middle school in the same school system as yours and thus far the workload has been underwhelming to say the least. My son is in accelerated classes, gets straight A's and he bangs out his homework (when he has it) pretty quickly.

Same for my youngest in elementary school.

Maybe the more burdensome workload does not really start until HIS, but in knowing/speaking w/other parents in the same school district that have kids in HS, this has been a non-issue/discussion point.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Ronn Burgandy View Post
I'm merely commenting on how humans have evolved as I think its kinda flawed. .."
Understand much about evolution? - the ones that 'work' get to determine the future.
The lazy ones don't get much say in it.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:45 AM
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Go into school and sit down with the teachers and principal. Let them know what's going on. Multiple teachers equals multiple homework assignments. If he didn't get homework you'd be upset he didn't get any. Parents need to take an active role in the education process.

Last edited by YFMF; 09-09-2015 at 11:17 AM.
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Old 09-09-2015, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by LouTiffs View Post
Understand much about evolution? - the ones that 'work' get to determine the future.
The lazy ones don't get much say in it.
That's not evolution my friend.
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