Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > Dockside Chat
Reload this Page >

Auto insurance experts, step inside

Notices

Auto insurance experts, step inside

Old 08-31-2015, 04:21 PM
  #1  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
slper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Lakeland, Fl
Posts: 4,554
Received 1,045 Likes on 457 Posts
Default Auto insurance experts, step inside

I have a few question.

You have full coverage insurance, I drive your car, your car is still insured if I wreck it, right?

I have full coverage insurance on my cars, my 15 drives my car now and is covered. Why do I have to add her to my insurance when she turns 16 if she is covered as I am if I drive someone else's car?

Scott
Old 08-31-2015, 04:39 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: chicago area
Posts: 178
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

No! I did not give you permission to drive my car!

Does she have a valid driver's license? The reason they want her info is to check and follow her driving habits and to rate to that on renewal. Teenagers have the worst driving records and the insurance co. underwrites with that in mind.
Old 08-31-2015, 04:44 PM
  #3  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
slper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Lakeland, Fl
Posts: 4,554
Received 1,045 Likes on 457 Posts
Default

Yes she has a DL. I agree with your statements but do I need to add her to my insurance or can she drive my car that is fully insured and be ok at the age of 16?
Old 08-31-2015, 04:44 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: South, FL
Posts: 7,493
Received 1,353 Likes on 646 Posts
Default

There is a difference between permissive use and regular use.

It's different if a friend tosses you the keys and says go ahead and take her for a spin as opposed to your daughter living in your household with full access to the keys. She can legally take any car at anytime if she wants to. If you drive your friends car more than a few times per year many companys will ask that you are added to the policy as well.

It's usually the second question after after "are you okay?" when making a claim
Old 08-31-2015, 05:02 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: South, FL
Posts: 7,493
Received 1,353 Likes on 646 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by slper View Post
Yes she has a DL. I agree with your statements but do I need to add her to my insurance or can she drive my car that is fully insured and be ok at the age of 16?
If she lives in the same house as you. You need to add her.
Old 08-31-2015, 05:14 PM
  #6  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: West Carolina
Posts: 22,022
Received 1,596 Likes on 864 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by slper View Post
I have a few question.

You have full coverage insurance, I drive your car, your car is still insured if I wreck it, right?

I have full coverage insurance on my cars, my 15 drives my car now and is covered. Why do I have to add her to my insurance when she turns 16 if she is covered as I am if I drive someone else's car?

Scott
Because when she gets her license the DMV will ask for proof of insurance. When she/you obtain proof of insurance from your agent/company they will add her as a driver.
Old 08-31-2015, 05:15 PM
  #7  
Admirals ClubCaptains Club Member Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Somewhere on the Big Bend.
Posts: 938
Received 144 Likes on 83 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Leeroyjenkins View Post
If she lives in the same house as you. You need to add her.
It pretty much boils down to this. Residents of the same house typically have to be listed on a policy to be covered.
Old 08-31-2015, 05:16 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Sarasota area
Posts: 3,253
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

There is no such thing as "full coverage", unless you have completely maxed every limit available.
Please don't say "full coverage", it's not a true statement
Old 08-31-2015, 05:20 PM
  #9  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: West Carolina
Posts: 22,022
Received 1,596 Likes on 864 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by chimmike View Post
There is no such thing as "full coverage", unless you have completely maxed every limit available.
Please don't say "full coverage", it's not a true statement
Is "make me whole" any better.
Old 08-31-2015, 05:24 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Sarasota area
Posts: 3,253
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Poppin cork View Post
It pretty much boils down to this. Residents of the same house typically have to be listed on a policy to be covered.
This, and frankly, ANYONE who has "regular" use of your vehicles, regardless of where they live.

You have a buddy who drops by and uses your cars for long trips or something because his is unreliable. If he's a regular user and you don't add him to your policy, there may be some language within the policy that could preclude coverage.

The purpose behind this is, if someone is a "regular" user, they need to do actuarial and underwriting work on it. Age of the driver? Gender? Prior driving history? Residence location? These all come in to play with regards to rating.

Say your buddy Joe is a regular user, lives in a safe, quiet part of town, has a perfect driving record, credit, and is married, adding him may not cost a whole lot.

Your 15 year old needs to be on your policy NOW, or at least notify them you have a pre-licensed driver behind the wheel sometimes. Read your policy, and feel free to ask here if you have policy language-related questions. Chances are many of us here have experience extrapolating the 'real' meaning behind clauses with respect to case law or real-world application
Old 08-31-2015, 05:25 PM
  #11  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
slper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Lakeland, Fl
Posts: 4,554
Received 1,045 Likes on 457 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by chimmike View Post
There is no such thing as "full coverage", unless you have completely maxed every limit available.
Please don't say "full coverage", it's not a true statement
How does "you have my full payment for my policy" sound
Old 08-31-2015, 05:28 PM
  #12  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
slper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Lakeland, Fl
Posts: 4,554
Received 1,045 Likes on 457 Posts
Default

Thanks for the education guys! You have answered another one of my pondering sessions...
Old 08-31-2015, 05:29 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Sarasota area
Posts: 3,253
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Shag View Post
Is "make me whole" any better.
Usually when I hear that question it's after they've been made "whole" with regards to property damage.

Had one guy try to claim mental anguish after clean water loss at his new home, that it "turned his life upside down".

I told him to let me know what his shrink says
Old 08-31-2015, 05:30 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Sarasota area
Posts: 3,253
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by slper View Post
How does "you have my full payment for my policy" sound
It sounds like your agent is a happy man
Old 08-31-2015, 05:30 PM
  #15  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Panama City
Posts: 1,113
Likes: 0
Received 271 Likes on 101 Posts
Default

Insurance follows the car, so, anyone driving should be covered by whatever amount of insurance you have on it.

Having said that, you need to add her to the policy and the carrier wants her added so they can charge you for her driving. She is a household member and would be considered a regular driver.

If you have a regular driver and do not disclose it, it could be called 'material misrepresentation' which could result in a denial of coverage.

In my experience, the carrier would likely cover a claim despite the child not being added, but, they will typically back charge to the inception of that policy term and keep the person on moving forward.
Old 08-31-2015, 05:32 PM
  #16  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: West Carolina
Posts: 22,022
Received 1,596 Likes on 864 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by chimmike View Post
Usually when I hear that question it's after they've been made "whole" with regards to property damage.
Did he have a deductible?
Old 08-31-2015, 05:32 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,003
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

I'm not sure that she would not be covered . I think if you buy homeowners and they ask what type of dogs you have and you tell them your people eater is a little fuzz ball you are still covered. If you have to make a claim you may have to pay the difference in premium for not telling them.

I don't know if this works the same on car insurance and I'm not suggesting you take my word for it.
Old 08-31-2015, 05:34 PM
  #18  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
THT sponsor
 
Schmaltz~Herring's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Cruising Lake Titikacka On My 18' Bayliner~Soon Upgrading to a 45' SeaVee With Quint 450's
Posts: 18,124
Received 1,364 Likes on 690 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Leeroyjenkins View Post
If she lives in the same house as you. You need to add her.

As a licensed driver and member of the household she represents a risk to the Insurance Company and must be declared.
Old 08-31-2015, 05:48 PM
  #19  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: West Carolina
Posts: 22,022
Received 1,596 Likes on 864 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Schmaltz~Herring View Post
As a licensed driver and member of the household she represents a risk to the Insurance Company and must be declared.
"Should" be declared. Someone please find me an exclusion for an undeclared driver using my car on a regular basis with permission. (Unless there was mis-rep on the application or mis-rep on any follow-up questionnaires).

To the OP's question, she will have to show proof of insurance to get her license. It comes from your agent/company and they will add her as a driver, as they should.

We have seen a lot of undeclared drivers especially with our aging drivers and their caretakers driving them around. People don't think to call about a caretaker driving mom or dad around in their car. Turns out some of their driving records suck and the company would come off the policy with them being regular drivers but, if there is an accident, there is coverage.

ETA: There is an exclusion in the policy about non-owned coverage if there are other polices in the household but that wasn't the question. Whole nother story.
Old 08-31-2015, 09:02 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: South, FL
Posts: 7,493
Received 1,353 Likes on 646 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Schmaltz~Herring View Post
As a licensed driver and member of the household she represents a risk to the Insurance Company and must be declared.
Hey don't get all lawyery on me. I figured I would explain it at simply as possible. I originally typed out "Just because" but figured I would at least elaborate a little bit more

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.