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Old 08-30-2015, 06:03 PM   #1
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Default Any drummers around here?

Been interested in learning for sometime and am thinking of buying a set. Doing some research on if I should buy electronic or acoustic. From the reading I have done, appears noise and feel are the big differences. Also from my reading it appears beginner sets are out there but the cymbals are shit. I don't want the cheapest set but also don't want to spend a fortune and lose interest. I will take lessons to learn the basics then decide if I want to continue or learn on my own.

Who hear plays the drums? Any preference on electric or acoustic? Tips for a beginner?
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:17 PM   #2
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I've been playing for 15 years or so. Started with an all maple Pacific (PDP) 5pc acoustic kit, Paiste cymbals and a Tama Iron Cobra kick pedal. All other hardware is what came with the PDP kit. I spent around $700 for everything including a decent throne.

From there I moved to a Mapex Saturn Limited Birch 6pc kit with Zildjian 'A' series cymbals. Awesome sounding kit and the finish was like a fine piece of furniture. Great kit and highly recommended.

About 2 years ago, I moved to a Roland TD-15kv electronic kit. It's a great kit but its definitely different than the acoustic kit. It has the white mesh heads and have good rebound. The heads are quite a bit smaller than the acoustic heads so you have to be a little more accurate. Overall I really like the electronics and would highly recommend them. They do still make some noise when you play them. They thump when you hit them and the bass drum makes a pretty loud thud. Awesome being able to pipe MP3 player through the drum module and play along through headphones. Neighbors appreciate it. I also have a very simple Alesis kit at the office that has the hard rubber pads. I do not recommend the hard rubber pads. They are hard on your hands and wrists. Spend the money on either the Roland or Yamaha mesh heads.

Lessons are a good idea to get started. Simple things matter like how to count, how to hold the sticks, kit set-up, etc. I had taken some courses in college in music theory so I had a decent foundation and knew how to read music before I started. Progressed quickly for the first few years and really haven't learned much in the past 10 years or so. Just play music by ear or download drum tabs to learn new songs.

Enjoy.
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:43 PM   #3
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I have been playing for just shy of 30 years. My preference is acoustic over electric any day. My current set up at our church is a blend though. Acoustic snare and cymbals and electric toms and bass.

I has a small electric setup at home though to practice with. Its a Roland setup that I picked up off craigslist. The best part is my 10 year old can practice too and I can shut the door and watch TV in the next room.
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Old 08-31-2015, 12:50 AM   #4
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Go electric and plug in the headphones to keep your neighbors happy. But draw the curtains or they'll think you're beating your wife!
I sent you a PM....
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Old 08-31-2015, 04:37 AM   #5
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I bought a electronic set for my 40th birthday. Started learning from youtube videos.

E kits are great for learning because it is easy to play with a click track or simple bass line groove and use some triggers for keyboard fills etc. They are a lot of fun. I have a yamaha dtx 900. I would consider selling if it is something you would be interested in. I mainly play my Yamaha Beech custom kit now. As you get more advanced it becomes more difficult to get the "textures" with a e kit, ghost notes etc. I find with a E kit it is almost impossible to make a linear pattern sound good, but some of that is my technique I am sure, I am no Steve Gadd lol.
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Old 08-31-2015, 05:55 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tilemule View Post
I bought a electronic set for my 40th birthday. Started learning from youtube videos.

I can always tell who learned from watching Youtube videos. lol. Those drummers can almost always throw down the craziest back beat, off hand rhythms but very few understand the concepts associated with basic drumming fundamentals.

My son is in the same boat. He wants to add crazy half beats and fills to even the simplest song. Sometimes the best drummer is the one who simply plays a steady beat and only occasionally enhances it.

Check out Standton Moore for some classic stick work with flair.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAJtmDQBvF8


One sided note to learning by listening to other drummers/bands - remember that there may be more than one drummer on stage! Pre-youtube, I played along for years to some James Taylor songs and could never figure out how the drummer put the combinations together then I went to a concert. He had two drummers! One would play the steady beat and the other would fill.


Welcome to the world of flams, and paradiddles.

http://www.vicfirth.com/education/
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Old 08-31-2015, 07:12 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k9medic View Post
I can always tell who learned from watching Youtube videos. lol. Those drummers can almost always throw down the craziest back beat, off hand rhythms but very few understand the concepts associated with basic drumming fundamentals.

My son is in the same boat. He wants to add crazy half beats and fills to even the simplest song. Sometimes the best drummer is the one who simply plays a steady beat and only occasionally enhances it.

Check out Standton Moore for some classic stick work with flair.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAJtmDQBvF8


One sided note to learning by listening to other drummers/bands - remember that there may be more than one drummer on stage! Pre-youtube, I played along for years to some James Taylor songs and could never figure out how the drummer put the combinations together then I went to a concert. He had two drummers! One would play the steady beat and the other would fill.


Welcome to the world of flams, and paradiddles.

http://www.vicfirth.com/education/

I never found Stanton Moore all that interesting, don't get me wrong great technical drummer.

I am more interested in the greats like Bernard Purdie, James Gadson (His groove on Use me by Bill Withers is great) Lloyd Knibb and of course Clyde Stubblefield. As far as modern drummers go Gil Sharone has a amazingly diverse body of work.

Bernard Purdie always seems to have so much fun playing! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DyC02BM_P4
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Old 08-31-2015, 07:44 AM   #8
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Been playing off and on for 15+ years. Haven't had my kit set up in a few years though... I've been wanting to get a jam room put together and start playing again but need an extra room in the house, my kit takes up a lot of room.

When I was younger and seriously into playing I drove my parents and neighbors nuts. I had the rubber practice pads, but never liked playing with them as much. I took lessons periodically but mainly self-taught. Some of my favorites are Jon Fishman, Carter Beauford, Jon Bonham and Niel Pert.

Started with a cheap beginner set and then moved on to a big 9 piece Pearl Export Series with a rack and all the bells and whistles. Always had Sabian cymbals.

I've toyed with the idea of getting rid of the drum kit since I never play anymore but I think it's worth more to me than any buyer. And if I sold it for $1,000 the money would be gone in no time and I'd have no drums... So they sit in a pile in the corner.
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Old 08-31-2015, 08:15 AM   #9
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I have to come clean on some things regarding drumming.... My father started playing drums in the late 40's and played up until he died in 2010. He was an amazing drummer who knew the fundamentals inside and out which was passed down to me at a young age. (I came around much later in my dad's life.)

Much of his time was spent playing jazz in the late fifties and early sixties in and around New Orleans. He was one of the session drummers for Fats Domino and became friends with him and many others over the years.

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Old 08-31-2015, 01:46 PM   #10
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Have been drumming for over 30 years…

..for the OP
If just starting, and/or for kids, I would actually go with the eKit. It takes LOTS of patience for others in the house for someone learning this instrument on a standard set. The eKits have come a long way over the years.

eKIT should give you a selection of sounds which will probably keep you more interested in the beginning, and also a built in metronome which is essential for laying the groundwork if you ever plan on jamming with others. It will also have volume control, and the kit is lighter and more easily transported which prevents the jam sessions from always being at your place (unless that is part of the appeal for you)

The big drawback in learning on an eKIT is the touch and feel. The eKit will be much more “bouncy” with the electronic pads. I think it is an easy adjustment in moving to an eKit after having learned on an acoustic, but not so the other way.

If you ever find yourself ready gig out where you need an acoustic kit, you will likely want something else other than what you started out with. You can make an entry level acoustic kit sound good with proper tuning. There are a lot of people with premium kits that sound like crap because they don’t know how to tune them (just like guitars). you are right about the cymbals. Generally, you get what you pay for.

Good luck!!
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Old 08-31-2015, 01:52 PM   #11
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I was interested in learning how to play too, after 2 lessons I realized I have no sense of rhythm what-so-ever.....Carl the guy giving me lessons agreed.
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Old 08-31-2015, 04:05 PM   #12
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Thanks guys, I appreciate all the advice. After doing additional research, looks like Ekit is the way to go. My only concern is, if I love it, will i be able to take what I learn on an ekit and switch it over to an acoustic set up?

I'll keep an eye out on craiglists as well as the local music stores.I don't have an issue buying used as long as it isn't beat to hell!

Tile - Did a bit of research on the Yamaha dtx 900 and it may be a bit more than I want to spend. I want to be careful I don't spend too much then in a few months lose interest,

Russ - I don't have much rhythm but I am hoping with enough practice, I can learn. If not...check the for sale section in about 3 months for a slightly used eKit setup!

K9 - really neat that your dad was in a band in the 40s -50s. Did he pass the musical talent on down to you?

Jay - Check your PMs

Thanks again for all the comments. As always, you all are big help!
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Old 08-31-2015, 04:21 PM   #13
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The first thing to remember about being a drummer is that it's your job to make sure the pizza arrives in 30 minutes or less, and if it's late your customer will get $3 off, and you will not get a good tip. To maximize your profits, try to get the pizzas delivered on time.

My brother is a drummer, but he recently took up the bass. He got tired of the signs in our local music store windows indicating that all drummers must be accompanied by an adult. After a couple weeks he gave it up, though, as he wasn't able to get the right sound; we determined he wasn't hitting it hard enough with the stick.

Eventually he went back to drums. He really missed the perks; leaving his drumsticks on the dashboard allows him to park in handicap spots.
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Old 08-31-2015, 06:06 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironlung View Post
the first thing to remember about being a drummer is that it's your job to make sure the pizza arrives in 30 minutes or less, and if it's late your customer will get $3 off, and you will not get a good tip. To maximize your profits, try to get the pizzas delivered on time.

My brother is a drummer, but he recently took up the bass. He got tired of the signs in our local music store windows indicating that all drummers must be accompanied by an adult. After a couple weeks he gave it up, though, as he wasn't able to get the right sound; we determined he wasn't hitting it hard enough with the stick.

Eventually he went back to drums. He really missed the perks; leaving his drumsticks on the dashboard allows him to park in handicap spots.
wtf??
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Old 08-31-2015, 06:26 PM   #15
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very interesting subject, years ago neighbors kid took on acoustics for a month or so, if I would have had the money I'd have bought him an electric set, I'd splurge and get a nice set, even if you give up on them I bet every once in a while you'll still go back to them, good luck
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Old 09-01-2015, 06:42 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bstnsportsfan View Post
K9 - really neat that your dad was in a band in the 40s -50s. Did he pass the musical talent on down to you?


Thanks again for all the comments. As always, you all are big help!
Yes, as I mentioned earlier, I have been playing for almost 30 years.
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Old 09-08-2015, 03:57 PM   #17
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Bought a Roland TD-1K-EC....same as the TD 1K but it has an extra cymbal. It was on clearance at guitar center then with an extra 15% off and free shipping it'll be a great set to learn on. I had also looked at the 11k but couldn't justify $1k if I don't know how long I am going to be into it for. If I love it and outgrow this set up, I'll buy the 11.

Thanks guys for your advice!
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Old 09-16-2015, 11:14 AM   #18
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This looks like a nice set for the back yard.
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