Notices

Skeet & Sporting Clay

Old 08-25-2015, 04:29 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 287
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default Skeet & Sporting Clay

First timer with skeet & clay here. Just bought my 12 year old a Beretta 686 Pigeon .410 30" barrel. Gonna be hunting rail birds this fall & figured some time at the range would do some good. Any tips or pointers from those experienced with skeet & clay shooting would be welcome. Looking to make it a Fun experience for the boy!
Old 08-25-2015, 04:46 PM
  #2  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: kitty hawk,nc.
Posts: 4,398
Received 726 Likes on 370 Posts
Default

Get him lessons from a good instructor, hard to break bad learned habits.

Much harder to hit a target with a 410 than it is with a 20 ga.
Old 08-25-2015, 04:56 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Wandering the ocean
Posts: 754
Likes: 0
Received 4 Likes on 4 Posts
Default

Yeah not to sound dickish, but the gun you bought him while beautiful is totally wrong as a starter gun in my opinion.

Something like this would be a much better starter piece
http://mpcsports.com/browseproducts/...t-RL-12ga.HTML

I guess you could go 20 gauge but, it really only marginally better than a .410.
Old 08-25-2015, 05:05 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 5,293
Received 462 Likes on 238 Posts
Default

I'm interested as well. I have been wanting to learn this as well - think this fall I need to get off my butt and take some lessons.
Old 08-25-2015, 05:08 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Wandering the ocean
Posts: 754
Likes: 0
Received 4 Likes on 4 Posts
Default

You can learn to shoot with any gun, but with more soldiers it certainly is a lot easier to pick up a few birds you would not have.

My advice is learn to shoot trap first and go from there. Sporting clays and skeet are much more challenging form a beginners standpoint.
Old 08-25-2015, 05:11 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 1,256
Received 735 Likes on 324 Posts
Default

Have to agree with the 410 being a far from optimal choice for a youngster. I'm fairly decent on the skeet range and I don't shoot a 410 well at all on it. One of the hardest things for most youngsters I've seen to learn is keep their follow thru and not stop their swing. Agree with some lessons if you have a good instructor close by.
Old 08-25-2015, 05:12 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Hooksett, NH
Posts: 1,699
Received 102 Likes on 58 Posts
Default

I'd start him with one of these and a box of clays

http://www.cabelas.com/product/Shoot...gclsrc%3Daw.ds

easy for beginners to duplicate shots to practice leading the target
Old 08-25-2015, 05:16 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Oriental NC ,
Posts: 1,196
Received 110 Likes on 51 Posts
Default

I shoot a K-80 with four sets of tubes, its a heavy shotgun too heavy for a youth, if yu are going to teach him on a stacked, 28 gauge is ok and what I shoot bird hunting not as hard on an old shoulder shells are not cheap, a pro will have him busting birds in no time 28 or 20 gauge is a good choice.
Old 08-25-2015, 05:45 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 470
Likes: 0
Received 64 Likes on 45 Posts
Default

Started my son when he was nine, 26" .410 was my choice for low recoil. I only let him shoot at close range pop ups, EZEE targets only. Proper stance, leaning into the gun is key, new shooters have a tendency to lean back instead of getting on the stock and "in the gun"
It was slow going, but fun and a confidence builder, his twelve year old sister puts a pretty good hammering on some decent targets with a 20 Guage, there is a very significant difference between 410 and 20, (effective range and pellet count)
He will now start shooting a 28 Guage gas gun @ 10 years old (so much fun) and his skills will improve. It's a long road but one well remembered and much enjoyed.
My friends and I occasionally shoot fun tournaments with 28's and 20's and do quite well. There's a lot to shot gunning and I'm no pro.
I started both of my kids showing them the trash can at the shooting station and letting them visualize the rim as being the pattern of shot. (Roughly a 30" circle)
Then we shot pellet guns and I mentioned that the time it takes for the pellet to hit a target at 20-30 yards is about the same with the shotgun 11-1400 feet per second. Bird goes left, aim left of the bird.
My daughter can take some skins off of many an adult if she doesn't let the fact that adults are watching her get in her head. (Shooting a 20 ga gas gun)
As a family we shoot about 10k shells a year, next fall my son will be in South Dakota pheasant hunting for the first time, just before kids weekend deer hunting. 3" 28 guage will put down sone good sized birds when put in the right spot.
That being said, I've had some retired guys whip my ass much more underpowered than I.
Old 08-25-2015, 06:46 PM
  #10  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Rocky Point FL
Posts: 8,770
Received 1,624 Likes on 777 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by lilnoah View Post
First timer with skeet & clay here. Just bought my 12 year old a Beretta 686 Pigeon .410 30" barrel. Gonna be hunting rail birds this fall & figured some time at the range would do some good. Any tips or pointers from those experienced with skeet & clay shooting would be welcome. Looking to make it a Fun experience for the boy!
Holy first gun batman I am 48 but open to be adopted. Nice starter gun
Old 08-25-2015, 06:47 PM
  #11  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Kingston, TN, USA and Plash Island, AL
Posts: 4,704
Received 1,071 Likes on 705 Posts
Default

Having worked with kids for almost 50 years now (damn, I'm old), my solution has been a Remington 1100LT 20 gauge, and then bought an additional short (youth) barrel with screw-in chokes. I bought a Fajen stock, and cut it to fit my 10-year old son. When he grew, I added a recoil pad to lengthen the pull, then graduated to the factory stock. I loaned the gun to my college roommate for his son who went through the same succession of stocks over 3 years, then to a succession of friends as their sons and daughters got interested in shooting. I shoot it with the regular barrel and a recoil pad on the factory stock for doves.
When starting out, it is treated strictly as a single-shot. The gas operation reduces felt recoil significantly, and the 20 gauge with a skeet choke gives you much greater room for error than either a .410 or a 28, but the recoil with light loads is truly negligible.
Old 08-25-2015, 07:02 PM
  #12  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Houston,Tx,U.S.A
Posts: 11,787
Received 876 Likes on 470 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by lilnoah View Post
First timer with skeet & clay here. Just bought my 12 year old a Beretta 686 Pigeon .410 30" barrel. Gonna be hunting rail birds this fall & figured some time at the range would do some good. Any tips or pointers from those experienced with skeet & clay shooting would be welcome. Looking to make it a Fun experience for the boy!
He will enjoy the experience and learn as he goes, keep him shooting sub gauge events and he will be ok, 100 bird main events will just cause discouragement.

Now 1 pellet with chip a clay on a skeet field, what you need to do is level the field with chokes for him and teach him who to select the proper choke.

There is no reason in the world he cannot learn the proper fundamentals and become a great shooter even starting with a 410.

I have a son who shoots at the college level.

Call Brileys tomorrow and discuss chokes, they will not over sell you and will give you some great advise.

http://www.briley.com/

Good luck and encouragement goes much further than "Why didn't you hit that easy bird"

John
Old 08-25-2015, 07:42 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 287
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Thanks for all the input. I understand with a "full choke you can get a basketball ball size pattern @ 15 yards. Limitation here is gonna be shot pattern density & speed." 20 ga. Is probably going to be my next pick up & sounds like more of a confidence builder for the boy on birds? I still anticipate the sporting skill that would go along with hunting with the .410 and flushing birds off the front of my (can I ca it a boat) boat. Sure is good with single .410 on rabbit. Either way she's a coming home with us for some fine living.

We will be hunting out of hobie pro angler kayaks on flood tides so there is another element to go along with the hunts.
Old 08-25-2015, 08:50 PM
  #14  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Kilmarnock, VA
Posts: 4,196
Received 541 Likes on 279 Posts
Default

He's hnting out of a kayak with a .410??

Kind of like me telling my kids that I used to walk to school 4 miles in the snow....up hill...both ways.
Old 08-26-2015, 03:23 AM
  #15  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Somewhere in the middle of Michigan
Posts: 10,576
Likes: 0
Received 1,333 Likes on 714 Posts
Default

The biggest problem I have with .410 is ammo availability. For skeet shooting, #9 shot is the best choice, but I can never find that in factory .410 loads. If the OP reloads, this is not an issue.

I agree with the advice to start with trap, but if you have a skeet range that will let you do it, have the youngster start shooting at station 7 only to build some comfort and confidence. It's the easiest station on the course. Sporting clays is OK once he learns to shoot all the skeet stations.
Old 08-26-2015, 04:06 AM
  #16  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hunt Valley MD
Posts: 503
Received 241 Likes on 118 Posts
Default

Lots of people will be willing to help at gun ranges only problem is everyone is a expert for my 2 cents. Gun safety is the most important keep it unloaded until ready to shoot keep it aimed down range. I shoot about 30000 targets a year until. I had a shoulder injury no I only shoot 50 bird leagues in the winter months due to the pain involved. Break action guns are a lot safer then semi autos in my mind gun fit is key if it doesn't fit it will be hard to be consistent 28 gauge or 12 gauge 7/8 ounce loads will give a good effective pattern. Best of luck.

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.