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Why do some boating myths never seem to die

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Why do some boating myths never seem to die

Old 07-14-2015, 11:15 PM
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Default Why do some boating myths never seem to die

I was told oh never put you batteries on a concrete floor if you pull them out the boat. They will ground and be no good.
2.never buy an inboard out board if you are in slat or brackish wster
when fishing and the mullets are jumping nothing is biting


Any the advice myths you heard turned out to be less than true.
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Old 07-14-2015, 11:33 PM
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I think the batteries on concrete floors is more about damaging the floor than anything else but I did hear old style rubber cased batteries had a problem.
The I/O thing really refers to slipped boats, you can't tilt the outdrive out all the way and I never heard the mullet thing.

Probably the biggest untrue myths regard ethanol. Certainly there is a problem with long term storage and some old style parts might be attacked but it has been in road gas for decades and I don't see cars crumbling before my eyes. I will agree, it is far more of a pork barrel giveaway to the big agriculture interests than anything good for the consumer tho.
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Old 07-14-2015, 11:40 PM
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Originally Posted by gfretwell View Post
I think the batteries on concrete floors is more about damaging the floor than anything else but I did hear old style rubber cased batteries had a problem.
The I/O thing really refers to slipped boats, you can't tilt the outdrive out all the way and I never heard the mullet thing.

Probably the biggest untrue myths regard ethanol. Certainly there is a problem with long term storage and some old style parts might be attacked but it has been in road gas for decades and I don't see cars crumbling before my eyes. I will agree, it is far more of a pork barrel giveaway to the big agriculture interests than anything good for the consumer tho.
Cars generally don't sit for long periods of time without running so the hygroscopic properties of ethanol don't often become an issue.The solvent properties on older cars? Well who knows? Ethanol is typically not a problem in new cars other than reducing your potential fuel mileage by about 4%. As for other non-boating applications, go over to the Ducati forum and ask some of the guys who have been fighting the company in court for a few years over the plastic gas tanks on the Sport Classic series and other models how they feel about ethanol.
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Old 07-15-2015, 12:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Bugsbunnyboater View Post
I was told oh never put you batteries on a concrete floor if you pull them out the boat. They will ground and be no good.
2.never buy an inboard out board if you are in slat or brackish wster
when fishing and the mullets are jumping nothing is biting


Any the advice myths you heard turned out to be less than true.
Originally Posted by jdm61 View Post
Cars generally don't sit for long periods of time without running so the hygroscopic properties of ethanol don't often become an issue.The solvent properties on older cars? Well who knows? .
Lots of Preformance cars sit in the garages for long periods of time during the winter up north. I used to park my 1995 camaro November 1st and take it out the end of April. I agree I think a lot of people want to blame ethanol becuase it's easy they don't know what went wrong.


The salt water I/o thing is a pain and gets perpetuated half the time by people who never owned them just a friend said or they read on the net.

I think most myths are perpetuated by people becuase they read or saw it on the net or a friend told them.
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Old 07-15-2015, 02:57 AM
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In Europe over 95% of boats of more than 23ft in length are inboard powered and probably over 50% of those are with I/O. Virtually all sit in salt water - again it's very rare for this size boat to be on a trailer in Europe.
From people I know who own them, I would say they definitely seem to be a pain, but also it seems very few of the problems are actually related to them being left in salt water - most of what I see would have happened regardless.

Never heard of the batteries on a concrete floor thing before.
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Old 07-15-2015, 03:33 AM
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Banana's on a boat is bad luck. I've had banana's on the boat a hundred times along with the guys I take out.

This one seems kind of true but not always: when the wind is out of the east the fish bite the least, when the wind is out of the west the fish bite the best.

Red at night sailors delight, red in the morning sailor take warning.

Procedure to change the name on your boat. I've had 10+ boats and I have either removed or changed the names on all of them. I've never been towed on any boat I've owned.

Last edited by RussH; 07-15-2015 at 06:00 PM.
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Old 07-15-2015, 03:34 AM
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I'm pretty sure the battery thing refers to years ago when batteries were glass. Heat exchange from a charging battery sitting on cool concrete....always used a piece of wood to sit it on.
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Old 07-15-2015, 03:35 AM
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Oh, the east versus west wind only refers to the "approach" of a low pressure system versus the "departure" of a low pressure system....rising or falling barometer.
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Old 07-15-2015, 03:36 AM
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don't put potatoes in the tree or your might fall off your trampoline
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Old 07-15-2015, 04:16 AM
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Don't forget to give the sea God an offering if you change the name of your boat Who wants to offend him ......right?
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Old 07-15-2015, 05:56 AM
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I put about 10 times the fuel through my boat as I do through my truck and the boat only has a 70 on it.
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Old 07-15-2015, 06:14 AM
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The most often repeated myth around here: An aluminum propeller will protect your gearcase
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Old 07-15-2015, 06:18 AM
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Cars are not open vented fuel systems, boats are. Ethanol does not do well in open vented fuel systems, this is not a myth it is fact. Add to this that boats tend to spend a lot of time in humid environments only adds to the problem.

Many boats had fiberglass fuel tanks ethanol destroyed, fuel lines ethanol destroyed, and engine fuel systems ethanol destroyed, plus storage problems in open vented systems. Only someone very inexperienced around boats would think Ethanol problems with boats are a myth.

Depends on how the mullet are jumping and what you are fishing for
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Old 07-15-2015, 06:37 AM
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Originally Posted by RussH View Post
Banana's on a boat is bad luck. I've had banana's on the boat a hundred times along with the guys I take out..
Bananas in the hammock is when I start to panic.
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Old 07-15-2015, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
Cars are not open vented fuel systems, boats are. Ethanol does not do well in open vented fuel systems, this is not a myth it is fact. Add to this that boats tend to spend a lot of time in humid environments only adds to the problem.

Many boats had fiberglass fuel tanks ethanol destroyed, fuel lines ethanol destroyed, and engine fuel systems ethanol destroyed, plus storage problems in open vented systems. Only someone very inexperienced around boats would think Ethanol problems with boats are a myth.
Sorry but BS and I would venture to say the opposite. the fiberglass fuel lines is true ethanol breaks down the resins that hold it together. But fuel lines were failing far before ethanol came on the market rubber breaks down plain and simple its more of a time issue then a chemical exposure it wasn't like fuel systems were going for the life of the boat prior to ethanol introduction they were still only going about 10 years or so. I would aslo through out there that only certain types of synthetic rubber and plastics really have issues with ethanol at all. Most manufactures who have built anything since the introduction of ethanol have removed these components and anytime you do replacements the parts have been upgraded.

Boats fuel systems are open vented to the atmosphere. Its been that way for as long as i have been on this planet. I can promise you that boats were getting water in there tanks far before ethanol was introduced. The condensation does not get in the tank because of ethanol it gets in the tank because as the air temperatures heat and cool expansions of the air happens. As the air heats and cools in the tank and new air is drawn in moister builds in the tank on the walls and hence you get water in your tank.

I put what ever fuel I want in tanks never had a problem with my cars or my boats. I have never had anything deteriorate that couldn't be explained simply by age. Now im not saying there are not people who have not had ethanol problems but not to the extent people want to blame it. My Parent have a larson 180ls they put around in on the lake when the boat hit about 11 years old the fuel lines needed to be replaced.the next spring the tank had to be drained because of water contamination in the fuel. That boat has never had any other fuel in it then ethanol free fuel.
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Old 07-15-2015, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Clinker View Post
In Europe over 95% of boats of more than 23ft in length are inboard powered and probably over 50% of those are with I/O. Virtually all sit in salt water - again it's very rare for this size boat to be on a trailer in Europe.
From people I know who own them, I would say they definitely seem to be a pain, but also it seems very few of the problems are actually related to them being left in salt water - most of what I see would have happened regardless.

Never heard of the batteries on a concrete floor thing before.
As far as the I/O in salt water thing, in Europe they may have anti fouling paint that actually works; that has been the main problem I've had. The paints we can use just don't work all that well.
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Old 07-15-2015, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Adam9066 View Post
Sorry but BS and I would venture to say the opposite. the fiberglass fuel lines is true ethanol breaks down the resins that hold it together. But fuel lines were failing far before ethanol came on the market rubber breaks down plain and simple its more of a time issue then a chemical exposure it wasn't like fuel systems were going for the life of the boat prior to ethanol introduction they were still only going about 10 years or so. I would aslo through out there that only certain types of synthetic rubber and plastics really have issues with ethanol at all. Most manufactures who have built anything since the introduction of ethanol have removed these components and anytime you do replacements the parts have been upgraded.

Boats fuel systems are open vented to the atmosphere. Its been that way for as long as i have been on this planet. I can promise you that boats were getting water in there tanks far before ethanol was introduced. The condensation does not get in the tank because of ethanol it gets in the tank because as the air temperatures heat and cool expansions of the air happens. As the air heats and cools in the tank and new air is drawn in moister builds in the tank on the walls and hence you get water in your tank.

I put what ever fuel I want in tanks never had a problem with my cars or my boats. I have never had anything deteriorate that couldn't be explained simply by age. Now im not saying there are not people who have not had ethanol problems but not to the extent people want to blame it. My Parent have a larson 180ls they put around in on the lake when the boat hit about 11 years old the fuel lines needed to be replaced.the next spring the tank had to be drained because of water contamination in the fuel. That boat has never had any other fuel in it then ethanol free fuel.

ignorance is bliss....

guess you think that whole phase separation is a lie.... and the special fuel lines for ethanol fuels is just a hoax.....

Last edited by Jeepman; 07-15-2015 at 08:03 AM.
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Old 07-15-2015, 08:01 AM
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One of the largest speck trouts I have ever caught was after seeing a school of mullet jumping 10-15 ft away.
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Old 07-15-2015, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by ParatusMS View Post
I'm pretty sure the battery thing refers to years ago when batteries were glass. Heat exchange from a charging battery sitting on cool concrete....always used a piece of wood to sit it on.
"However, this legend is historically based in fact. The first lead-acid batteries consisted of glass cells that were enclosed in tar-lined wooden boxes. A damp concrete floor could cause the wood to swell, breaking the glass inside"
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Old 07-15-2015, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Adam9066 View Post
Sorry but BS and I would venture to say the opposite. the fiberglass fuel lines is true ethanol breaks down the resins that hold it together. But fuel lines were failing far before ethanol came on the market rubber breaks down plain and simple its more of a time issue then a chemical exposure it wasn't like fuel systems were going for the life of the boat prior to ethanol introduction they were still only going about 10 years or so. I would aslo through out there that only certain types of synthetic rubber and plastics really have issues with ethanol at all. Most manufactures who have built anything since the introduction of ethanol have removed these components and anytime you do replacements the parts have been upgraded.

Boats fuel systems are open vented to the atmosphere. Its been that way for as long as i have been on this planet. I can promise you that boats were getting water in there tanks far before ethanol was introduced. The condensation does not get in the tank because of ethanol it gets in the tank because as the air temperatures heat and cool expansions of the air happens. As the air heats and cools in the tank and new air is drawn in moister builds in the tank on the walls and hence you get water in your tank.

I put what ever fuel I want in tanks never had a problem with my cars or my boats. I have never had anything deteriorate that couldn't be explained simply by age. Now im not saying there are not people who have not had ethanol problems but not to the extent people want to blame it. My Parent have a larson 180ls they put around in on the lake when the boat hit about 11 years old the fuel lines needed to be replaced.the next spring the tank had to be drained because of water contamination in the fuel. That boat has never had any other fuel in it then ethanol free fuel.
You are dead wrong my friend. I've had continual trouble in my boats and small equipment motors since ethanol was introduced. I'm not imagining it. Fuel systems last for many years without ethanol, I had an old 78' Evenrude 140 that was going on 40 years with all the original fuel lines etc. That all went to hell once I was forced to run ethanol since we can't get ethanol free in Southern California. I've had to rebuild all the fuel systems in my small engines, parts like primer bulbs just simply disintegrate, tubing just crumbles. And don't get me started on the issue of vapor lock and hard starting when warm, both boats have had this issue. Ethanol is a total disaster environmentally and economically for the marine business. It's anything but a myth.
Do you by chance grow corn for a living?
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