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Water from new hot water tank STINKS.

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Water from new hot water tank STINKS.

Old 06-04-2015, 07:07 PM
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Default Water from new hot water tank STINKS.

Had a new standard 50 gallon hot water tank installed about 2 months ago. It's heating the water just fine but the hot water keeps developing a bad odor. I drain the tank and it's good for a couple of weeks and then the smell comes back. So far I have drained it 5 times. I also have to clean out the little screens @ each faucet because there is black iron particles that fill up them up.

We have well water that has high iron content, very low sulfur content but the iron is high. There is no odor to the cold water, it's only the water coming from the hot water tank. The water going into the tank goes through the softener as all the incoming water does.

Any idea what is interacting with the water and the new tank?
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Old 06-04-2015, 07:13 PM
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Iron bacteria exacerbated by the anode. A chlorine treatment may work. I had smelly water once and shocked the system (which should be done yearly anyhow) and it was cured. Can also try switching to a zinc and aluminum anode. I would still perform a shock treatment regardless.
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Old 06-04-2015, 07:14 PM
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By the way, water soften ers make it worst.
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Old 06-04-2015, 07:30 PM
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also Turn it up all the way and leave it on !

Don't use a timer or turn it off !!! Btw NOT a warranty issue ... LOL !!!

also do the shock then the anode change ...
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:06 PM
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The one at our cabin has a very strong sulfur smell if it sits more than a week or so without being used. The first thing we do upon arrival is completely drain the hot water. After a cycle or two the smells goes away.

Are you using it daily and it still smells?
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Double Creek View Post
The one at our cabin has a very strong sulfur smell if it sits more than a week or so without being used. The first thing we do upon arrival is completely drain the hot water. After a cycle or two the smells goes away.

Are you using it daily and it still smells?
Yes its used daily. What is the easiest way to get chlorine into it?
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:10 PM
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Pour it into the water tank and run the outlets until you smell the chlorine.
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Old 06-04-2015, 09:21 PM
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From an article I read...
...............

"Most people don't have a problem with their hot water smelling bad. But for those who do it can be horrible. The problem is that the water (very often well water) reacts with the magnesium rod in the water heater and makes the water smell more like something from a septic tank. It can be really bad. I mean really bad. Like open the windows and vent the house bad. I had forgotten just how bad but a recent change has brought it all back.

I replaced my water heater this summer. Very often when someone who lives in the area puts in a new water heater they opt to remove the magnesium rod in them. The rod is there to help preserve and extend the life of the water heater. The idea is that the water will attack and eventually consume the rod and not eat holes in the tank itself. It is referred to as a sacrificial rod because it is meant to be dissolved over time. The problem is however that some water has minerals that react badly with the rod. My alkali water does just that, it reacts with the rod and makes the water smell really bad. In fact it even turns the water black. So when I turn on the hot water out gurgles this stuff that is like something from a volcanic hot spring. Not what you want to wash with. Removing the rod solves the problem, but it also usually voids the warranty on the water heater."
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by semperfifishing View Post
From an article I read...
...............

"Most people don't have a problem with their hot water smelling bad. But for those who do it can be horrible. The problem is that the water (very often well water) reacts with the magnesium rod in the water heater and makes the water smell more like something from a septic tank. It can be really bad. I mean really bad. Like open the windows and vent the house bad. I had forgotten just how bad but a recent change has brought it all back.

I replaced my water heater this summer. Very often when someone who lives in the area puts in a new water heater they opt to remove the magnesium rod in them. The rod is there to help preserve and extend the life of the water heater. The idea is that the water will attack and eventually consume the rod and not eat holes in the tank itself. It is referred to as a sacrificial rod because it is meant to be dissolved over time. The problem is however that some water has minerals that react badly with the rod. My alkali water does just that, it reacts with the rod and makes the water smell really bad. In fact it even turns the water black. So when I turn on the hot water out gurgles this stuff that is like something from a volcanic hot spring. Not what you want to wash with. Removing the rod solves the problem, but it also usually voids the warranty on the water heater."
I can agree that it smells REALLY bad! Where is the magnesium anode located and how do I get it out? And yes it does spew some black water which is causing the faucet screens to clog up.

As far as getting the chlorine in.....the supply line is a little boogered up and it took some big torque to get it to stop leaking. I don't know if I will be able to get it off without stripping or twisting the supply line. If I do get it off I doubt if I will get it to seal again so it won't leak. I guess the only other way would be to drain some of the water out and remove the upper heating element.
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Old 06-05-2015, 02:26 AM
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They might be referring to putting chlorine in the well. When I had our water tested, shocking the system was one of the things listed on their documentation. It involved putting chlorine in the well. As for more info i cant help, we didnt have any problems with our water so I didnt do it.
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Old 06-05-2015, 06:27 AM
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Semper is the winner on this one. Take the rod out, use a hack saw and cut the rod off and re-install the brass plug. A common practice here at my hunting shack in MN. The local hardware guy told me how to do it 10 years ago, still working not leaking, no smell.
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Old 06-05-2015, 06:58 AM
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Regardless of what you do, the system should still be shocked.

There are some good online methods that I originally used. The general idea is to dump bleach in the well. when pouring it in, pour it around the sides of the casing. I used maybe 1/2 gallon. you then run a hose into the well, rinsing down the sides. after doing this for 5 or 10 minutes you will eventually smell chlorine from the hose water. turn off hose then one at a time open each cold water faucet in the home until you smell the chlorine and then turn off. run the tub on hot until you smell the chlorine. now do all the HW faucets. It may be quicker to drain the HW tank and refill with the chlorinated water otherwise the first HW flush takes some time for the chlorine. let stand for a couple hours.

now, using the outside hose run the water until the bleach smell fades. This can take quite a while. you can also use test strips. I then flushed each of my cold water faucets for 5 minutes or so. don't forget to run the washing machine through a cycle once all the chlorine is cleared out.

shut off water heater before starting. Also, you may have to bypass the water softener. To flush the hot side you are best off draining the HW tank first then flushing the lines. Takes a long time to get the bleach out of the heater otherwise as the bleach just keeps diluting in the large vessel.

Doing this also loosens up all the crud in the system. That said, I remove faucet heads and/or the filter screens on those with them.

Don't do laundry (except maybe towels or whites) until a few days pass and the system has been in use for showers..

Its up to you on the toilets. the crud can clog the small valve and they may net seat properly and need to be cleaned.

I have done this yearly but skipped a year when my plumbing was replaced during a renovation and I then started with the smell. I was pretty bummed but going on a year since my last flush and everything is fine.
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Old 06-05-2015, 07:17 AM
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Try replacing the magnesium anode with an aluminum/zinc one.
The anode is a 1 1/8 hex on the top. If you have the extra warranty model then there will be another on the hot water side.
You need an anode to save your water heater from corrosion.
Read this article. I know this guy and he literally wrote the book on water heaters.
http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pag...r-heaters.html
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Old 06-05-2015, 08:10 AM
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Been fighting this issue since I bought my house in Nov 13... Well water... Had two well drillers out, both confirmed my well was the right depth for the area, sampled the water and both told me they couldn't guarantee me anything better. Really frustrating. Started out with replacing the anode rod, lasted 30 days, decided to just go for a new tank, lasted 30 days, pulled the rod out and cut it off, got another 30 days. Before someone starts, I really don't give a dam if my water heater only lasts 5 years instead of 20... Finally after losing it on the water treatment people they started with putting 1/2 cup bleach in the system every 40 days +/- which they charged me to do. Now they added an inlet so I can do it myself, it's a PIA. Good luck.
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