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Sump Pump Crock question

Old 03-13-2015, 06:40 PM
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Default Sump Pump Crock question

My son just bought a newer home with a basement. I was doing some work today and noticed the sump pump was running about every minute for about 6 seconds. It got up to 60 degrees here today and we are getting snow melt quickly.

The crock is not really that big. It had a sump pump with a fixed travel float that is not adjustable that cycled way to fast. So to day I added a second pump and used the first one as a back up. I set the old pump on concrete blocks to bring it up closer to the top. The new primary pump has a better adjustment as it has a tether type float on a cord. The sump crock only has one 4 inch PVC drain line going into it, it is about 6" down from the top of the concrete basement floor.

With the new pump setup it does run longer and way less frequently now but it stills cycles a lot. What happens is the pump will come on and pump then turn off below the main PVC line then a shit load of water runs drains out of the PVC and 3/4 fills the crock back up. I was thinking if I had the primary pump float set higher than the PVC by about 3" it would completely fill the pipe and not cycle as often but run longer. Am I asking for trouble doing this? Such as putting pressure on the floor or walls?
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Old 03-13-2015, 06:50 PM
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Sounds like you need a check valve right at the output of that pump, or maybe the one there is bad?
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Old 03-13-2015, 06:54 PM
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Set the pump on the floor of the basin and adjust float to turn on just at flow line of discharge pipe this will give you the maximum run . Don't let the water back into drain pipe that defeats the purpose of the collection drain pipe. Don't over think the cycle time it's doing exactly what it's designed to do. Faster pumps and higher discharge rated pumps equal quicker cycle times.
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:05 PM
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Don't do it. You want the water level as low as possible. As above, make sure water water is not backflowing past the check valve. Short of a larger or deeper crock, it sounds like you are as good as you will get. I have a client here pumping every 25 seconds and an inch of rain tomorrow.

Mike.
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by TheRealMacGyver View Post
Sounds like you need a check valve right at the output of that pump, or maybe the one there is bad?
both pumps have check valves on them and they are working, the water is not back draining into the pumps. The main 4" drain line coming into the crock is what is draining back in.



Originally Posted by Frma2z View Post
Set the pump on the floor of the basin and adjust float to turn on just at flow line of discharge pipe this will give you the maximum run . Don't let the water back into drain pipe that defeats the purpose of the collection drain pipe. Don't over think the cycle time it's doing exactly what it's designed to do. Faster pumps and higher discharge rated pumps equal quicker cycle times.
the new pump is on the bottom of the crock now. If I adjust the float cord and give if some more length it will probably pump to a lower level as it will allow the float to drop lower but it will also let the crock fill up more with that extra length I would think? And doing that would fill up the PVC all the way. And it sounds like you are saying that's not a good thing. So I probably have it set pretty good then right now.
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:23 PM
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I asked my builder friend about mine, he said that you don't want to let it fill the pipes.

Sounds like you have it about right. Once the ground thaws it should flow less.
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:35 PM
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We have a very small crock and we sit on rock so when it rains or when the snow melts we get a major gush of water. The bottom of the sump pit was just dirt/mud so I dug it deeper so I have room to stack 2 pumps one above the other. The upper pump is a back up to the main/lower pump. The lower pump will pump the water down to just a couple of inches. Getting this set up was basically trial and error, it also depends on what kind of pump switch you want to use. For my set up it was best to have an adjustable float switch to fine tune when the bottom pump turns on and off. The top pump will come on if the bottom pump fails when the water level gets just below the tile coming into the sump.

We have a whole house generator with an automatic transfer switch, wished I would have done this set up prior to having the bottom floor of the house flooded 3X when the power went out.

If I can help you in any way please feel free to contact me.

Russ
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:37 PM
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Thanks guys sounds like I am on the right track. I think his electric bill should also be lower with the pump running longer instead of short cycling constantly.
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:40 PM
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If you turn the pump off will the water level rise above basement floor or level out about the height of the drain pipe? Try to set the pump to protect floor and not to low pump water unnecessarily. Water in an inside drain pipe won't hurt anything if it's below the slab height. We sometimes set the pump on a concrete block to raise it up for this reason.

.
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by RussH View Post
We have a very small crock and we sit on rock so when it rains or when the snow melts we get a major gush of water. The bottom of the sump pit was just dirt/mud so I dug it deeper so I have room to stack 2 pumps one above the other. The upper pump is a back up to the main/lower pump. The lower pump will pump the water down to just a couple of inches. Getting this set up was basically trial and error, it also depends on what kind of pump switch you want to use. For my set up it was best to have an adjustable float switch to fine tune when the bottom pump turns on and off. The top pump will come on if the bottom pump fails when the water level gets just below the tile coming into the sump.

We have a whole house generator with an automatic transfer switch, wished I would have done this set up prior to having the bottom floor of the house flooded 3X when the power went out.

If I can help you in any way please feel free to contact me.

Russ
Thanks Russ, that's basically what I did to my sons. His crock is quite a bit bigger than yours. I have both pumps side by side but one is about a foot higher than the other.
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Steiger23 View Post
If you turn the pump off will the water level rise above basement floor or level out about the height of the drain pipe? Try to set the pump to protect floor and not to low pump water unnecessarily. Water in an inside drain pipe won't hurt anything if it's below the slab height. We sometimes set the pump on a concrete block to raise it up for this reason.

.
Yes it does seem to level out. If I unplug the pumps and watch the level it takes forever to climb past the PVC that is why I asked this question as it almost seems like it would rarely come on if I let it go past the PVC. But I don't want him to have any problems that were caused by his dad. My bride would never let me forget it. That's the way she rolls
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by mikeloew View Post
Yes it does seem to level out. If I unplug the pumps and watch the level it takes forever to climb past the PVC that is why I asked this question as it almost seems like it would rarely come on if I let it go past the PVC. But I don't want him to have any problems that were caused by his dad. My bride would never let me forget it. That's the way she rolls
You Sir are a very wise man. Good luck with your project.



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