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3-D printers

Old 02-04-2015, 11:41 AM
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Default 3-D printers

Any places I could pay to have something created?
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Old 02-04-2015, 11:47 AM
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Is there a university close by to where you are? Colorado State Univ. has printers that they let the public use.

On another note, our local Sam's Club has ones for sale! Around $1200 if I remember correctly.
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Old 02-04-2015, 12:58 PM
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Yes, UCF is about 30 miles or so. I will give them a call. Thanks, any other folks have any other ideas, would love to hear them.
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Old 02-04-2015, 06:37 PM
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Pm me what it is I own one and might be able to make it.
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Old 02-04-2015, 07:26 PM
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I might be able to get it printed for you. Not positive but I could try. What is it?
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Old 02-05-2015, 11:24 PM
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Spraynet, 3D printing may or may not be right for you.

I spent much of last spring working with a 3D printing company in Coral Gables. I had come up with a huge improvement on a standard, every day item that all of us use very often. While I was able to draw out 2D diagrams, I really needed to hold it in my hand to judge its true effectiveness.

That is when I approached 3D Chimera in Coral Gables. I showed them my design in person, but it was more than that. We spent many hours discussing why my invention was superior to existing products and they even suggested a few ways to improve my own design.

The next step was for them to convert my 2D drawings to a 3D CAD design. I inspected this design on the computer and it was EXACTLY what I wanted.

We then went ahead with rapid prototyping on a 3D printer. Guess what I found? While it was an amazing feeling to see my invention come alive in my hand, I realized almost immediately that my design did NOT accomplish the goals I had set for it. First generation- fail!

3D Chimera and I discussed changes. And when I say 3D Chimera and I, I mean it was me and their entire staff!!! Engineers, CAD guys, guys with decades of experience in injection molds, all kinds of bright guys who all brought together their talents to help me make my invention better.

Then, we printed off a few more of my inventions with the improvements- much better, but still a failure.

I think by the 5th generation, the product was PERFECT!!!

What I experienced was the pinnacle and best purpose for a 3D printing/rapid prototyping company.

I will NOT use them for production. When you want thousands of something built, you would not use a 3D printer. For me, when I am ready for production, I will use injection molding.

How much did all of the above cost? Less than you expect. How much would it have cost me 20 years ago, before 3D printing? IDK. I think we would be looking at five different molds! Each mold is several thousand dollars. The difference is, with my meager budget, I was able to afford 3D printing, whereas I would not have been able to afford several iterations of traditional molds.

Anyway, if you think my experience is something you would like to emulate, call Walter at 3D Chimera in Coral Gables:

http://3dchimera.com/

Tell them Rapi sent you. And tell them you wanna see the Iron Man mask!

Good luck!

==>Rapi
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:55 AM
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Sounds like Rapi has first hand experience. There are a couple of guys here in Grovetown, GA
http://m.chronicle.augusta.com/lates...augusta-region

Good luck
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Rapi View Post
Spraynet, 3D printing may or may not be right for you.

I spent much of last spring working with a 3D printing company in Coral Gables. I had come up with a huge improvement on a standard, every day item that all of us use very often. While I was able to draw out 2D diagrams, I really needed to hold it in my hand to judge its true effectiveness.

That is when I approached 3D Chimera in Coral Gables. I showed them my design in person, but it was more than that. We spent many hours discussing why my invention was superior to existing products and they even suggested a few ways to improve my own design.

The next step was for them to convert my 2D drawings to a 3D CAD design. I inspected this design on the computer and it was EXACTLY what I wanted.

We then went ahead with rapid prototyping on a 3D printer. Guess what I found? While it was an amazing feeling to see my invention come alive in my hand, I realized almost immediately that my design did NOT accomplish the goals I had set for it. First generation- fail!

3D Chimera and I discussed changes. And when I say 3D Chimera and I, I mean it was me and their entire staff!!! Engineers, CAD guys, guys with decades of experience in injection molds, all kinds of bright guys who all brought together their talents to help me make my invention better.

Then, we printed off a few more of my inventions with the improvements- much better, but still a failure.

I think by the 5th generation, the product was PERFECT!!!

What I experienced was the pinnacle and best purpose for a 3D printing/rapid prototyping company.

I will NOT use them for production. When you want thousands of something built, you would not use a 3D printer. For me, when I am ready for production, I will use injection molding.

How much did all of the above cost? Less than you expect. How much would it have cost me 20 years ago, before 3D printing? IDK. I think we would be looking at five different molds! Each mold is several thousand dollars. The difference is, with my meager budget, I was able to afford 3D printing, whereas I would not have been able to afford several iterations of traditional molds.

Anyway, if you think my experience is something you would like to emulate, call Walter at 3D Chimera in Coral Gables:

http://3dchimera.com/

Tell them Rapi sent you. And tell them you wanna see the Iron Man mask!

Good luck!

==>Rapi
Nice web site, are you looking for another designer? I'm ready to move south
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Old 02-06-2015, 05:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Rapi View Post
Spraynet, 3D printing may or may not be right for you.

I spent much of last spring working with a 3D printing company in Coral Gables. I had come up with a huge improvement on a standard, every day item that all of us use very often. While I was able to draw out 2D diagrams, I really needed to hold it in my hand to judge its true effectiveness.

That is when I approached 3D Chimera in Coral Gables. I showed them my design in person, but it was more than that. We spent many hours discussing why my invention was superior to existing products and they even suggested a few ways to improve my own design.

The next step was for them to convert my 2D drawings to a 3D CAD design. I inspected this design on the computer and it was EXACTLY what I wanted.

We then went ahead with rapid prototyping on a 3D printer. Guess what I found? While it was an amazing feeling to see my invention come alive in my hand, I realized almost immediately that my design did NOT accomplish the goals I had set for it. First generation- fail!

3D Chimera and I discussed changes. And when I say 3D Chimera and I, I mean it was me and their entire staff!!! Engineers, CAD guys, guys with decades of experience in injection molds, all kinds of bright guys who all brought together their talents to help me make my invention better.

Then, we printed off a few more of my inventions with the improvements- much better, but still a failure.

I think by the 5th generation, the product was PERFECT!!!

What I experienced was the pinnacle and best purpose for a 3D printing/rapid prototyping company.

I will NOT use them for production. When you want thousands of something built, you would not use a 3D printer. For me, when I am ready for production, I will use injection molding.

How much did all of the above cost? Less than you expect. How much would it have cost me 20 years ago, before 3D printing? IDK. I think we would be looking at five different molds! Each mold is several thousand dollars. The difference is, with my meager budget, I was able to afford 3D printing, whereas I would not have been able to afford several iterations of traditional molds.

Anyway, if you think my experience is something you would like to emulate, call Walter at 3D Chimera in Coral Gables:

http://3dchimera.com/

Tell them Rapi sent you. And tell them you wanna see the Iron Man mask!

Good luck!

==>Rapi
I am slowly trying to start a company like this on my own so I would be more then willing to print something for you. I am not sure if my quality will be up to snuff yet because I do have a cheaper 3d printer that needs more tinkering but I will be able to make any CAD files you need and print it which would be good to atleast get your hands on it.
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Old 02-06-2015, 05:42 AM
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Originally Posted by chad13 View Post
I am slowly trying to start a company like this on my own so I would be more then willing to print something for you. I am not sure if my quality will be up to snuff yet because I do have a cheaper 3d printer that needs more tinkering but I will be able to make any CAD files you need and print it which would be good to atleast get your hands on it.
Whats the name of your company? Looks like we are both in the same area
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Old 02-06-2015, 05:52 AM
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If anyone is interested in purchasing a low high quality 3D printer my sign supply company has had machines developed and produced exclusively for them to sell. I think you can get the printer and software for somewhere around $1200

http://knp3d.com/


Beware, this is not something for the average home computer guy. There is a huge learning curve with working with 3D CAD. As it becomes more popular the software will become more user friendly, just not there yet.

Also, as mentioned, 3D printers are not for production, they are for R&D. For example, producing a 6'' tall figurine can take 5-6 hours!

The industry for the casual user is in it's infancy and it growing very quickly. Kids today will be using these printers like us older folks use a calculator (remember those)
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Old 02-06-2015, 07:00 AM
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Originally Posted by FASTFJR View Post
Whats the name of your company? Looks like we are both in the same area
I haven't gotten that far and I currently work as a project manager for a big company. I am looking into building a side business in design and prototyping but am currently only working on my own ideas hopefully after I get a few out there I will be able to base my company around my experience from products I designed for my own use. I live on the Chester county side of Valley forge.
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Old 02-06-2015, 07:08 AM
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Originally Posted by signmansez View Post
If anyone is interested in purchasing a low high quality 3D printer my sign supply company has had machines developed and produced exclusively for them to sell. I think you can get the printer and software for somewhere around $1200

http://knp3d.com/


Beware, this is not something for the average home computer guy. There is a huge learning curve with working with 3D CAD. As it becomes more popular the software will become more user friendly, just not there yet.

Also, as mentioned, 3D printers are not for production, they are for R&D. For example, producing a 6'' tall figurine can take 5-6 hours!

The industry for the casual user is in it's infancy and it growing very quickly. Kids today will be using these printers like us older folks use a calculator (remember those)
Nice looking machine. I missed that machine when I was looking a few months ago. I have a Robo 3D. It is nice with how easy it works and it prints decent but I have problems on the first 3-4 layers seem to not melt together it just stays like strings connected to each other. I Have only had it for 2 months and with most prints being 5-10 hours it is tough to fine tune it.
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Old 02-06-2015, 09:17 AM
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Wow...

Funny how a simple thread can have such a mind of its own. I love the fact that some of you may get sales orders or jobs from this. I love " paying it forward" and not doing any work besides start the thread. Good karma!

Now, with regards to the 3-D printer. A student I know wants to makes a WWII Tiger tank for a school project. I told him I would build it with him out of balsa, foam board, cardboard, etc.. He then asked me if I knew anyone with a 3-D printer which I guess can make a really good replica from a picture. I told him that I didn't know anyone but I had a place I could ask.

So, I am looking for info on these printers. The copy needs to be about the size of a shoe box, what would a person need to have the printer make something like this? Our budget is about $35.00. Please don't laugh to hard...�� it is what it is.

Let me know if I am nuts even asking.

Thanks
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Old 02-06-2015, 10:32 AM
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I'll ask my buddy if he wants to do one
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Old 02-06-2015, 10:41 AM
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Tell your student to do it old school........
Amazon Amazon
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Old 02-06-2015, 10:46 AM
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That would be great, no pressure though. If it happens, great, if not, we can have a great time building one out of some lite material.
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by spraynet 1 View Post
That would be great, no pressure though. If it happens, great, if not, we can have a great time building one out of some lite material.
The size would be a little big most print max dimensions of about 8" X 8" X 8". I do not have the ability to make a Picture an STL. file right now. Also just a estimate that is Probably $20-30 in material and a 24 hour printing time.
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:21 PM
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You can find the needed STL files online just do a google search. I would make it if my printer was printing better be then it currently is.
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Old 02-06-2015, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Rapi View Post
Spraynet, 3D printing may or may not be right for you.

I spent much of last spring working with a 3D printing company in Coral Gables. I had come up with a huge improvement on a standard, every day item that all of us use very often. While I was able to draw out 2D diagrams, I really needed to hold it in my hand to judge its true effectiveness.

That is when I approached 3D Chimera in Coral Gables. I showed them my design in person, but it was more than that. We spent many hours discussing why my invention was superior to existing products and they even suggested a few ways to improve my own design.

The next step was for them to convert my 2D drawings to a 3D CAD design. I inspected this design on the computer and it was EXACTLY what I wanted.

We then went ahead with rapid prototyping on a 3D printer. Guess what I found? While it was an amazing feeling to see my invention come alive in my hand, I realized almost immediately that my design did NOT accomplish the goals I had set for it. First generation- fail!

3D Chimera and I discussed changes. And when I say 3D Chimera and I, I mean it was me and their entire staff!!! Engineers, CAD guys, guys with decades of experience in injection molds, all kinds of bright guys who all brought together their talents to help me make my invention better.

Then, we printed off a few more of my inventions with the improvements- much better, but still a failure.

I think by the 5th generation, the product was PERFECT!!!

What I experienced was the pinnacle and best purpose for a 3D printing/rapid prototyping company.

I will NOT use them for production. When you want thousands of something built, you would not use a 3D printer. For me, when I am ready for production, I will use injection molding.

How much did all of the above cost? Less than you expect. How much would it have cost me 20 years ago, before 3D printing? IDK. I think we would be looking at five different molds! Each mold is several thousand dollars. The difference is, with my meager budget, I was able to afford 3D printing, whereas I would not have been able to afford several iterations of traditional molds.

Anyway, if you think my experience is something you would like to emulate, call Walter at 3D Chimera in Coral Gables:

http://3dchimera.com/

Tell them Rapi sent you. And tell them you wanna see the Iron Man mask!

Good luck!

==>Rapi
Rapi, - That is a very good synopsis of how the process does (and should) work. Thanks for sharing it.

Although I rarely use it, my training and degree is in a marine focused area of Industrial Design. One very wise old instructor used to say that the first of anything will never be the best - be that idea, ideation, or prototype. There is a learning process that goes along with good design.

We are a long way from usable 3D printing in a production application, both in technology and materials, but there will come a time. But for modeling, prototyping, and things like marketing or training aids, it's had to remember how we ever did without it.

One tip for people renting time on printers, or working with home units. For lack of a better way to explain it, most will print faster in a larger shorter layer stack, than a smaller footprint of larger height. So if you have the footprint space you can often save time and money by cutting the part (in the computer model) into sections, and printing them side by side. Then just glue them together to build the part. For display or presentation purposes you will need to do a lot of cosmetic work on the part anyway, so filling the joints isn't an issue. If the part is just for design validation in the shop, the join lines don't matter.
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