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Moving a pool table?

Old 01-14-2015, 05:36 AM
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Default Moving a pool table?

I was wondering if you guys have any tips for me, I was given a pool table by a family member under the conditions that I have to get it out of their basement. It's a 7'olhausen with a 3 piece slate. I'm gonna head up there this weekend and take it apart. I live a couple hours away otherwise I would pay somebody. My plan is to move it myself then pay somebody to set it back up when my basement is finished. Thanks in advance.
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Old 01-14-2015, 05:37 AM
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Two man job, slate will be in three pieces, moving blankets..be careful with the slate
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Old 01-14-2015, 05:38 AM
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Originally Posted by gumpire View Post
Two man job, slate will be in three pieces, moving blankets..be careful with the slate
Yeah I have a friend who volunteered to help.
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Old 01-14-2015, 05:40 AM
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The legs come off and then if tipped onto its edge onto furniture dolly's so it can be moved around and run up onto a ramp gated utility trailer.... but its going to take two people. Thats how I moved one. We took one leg off a time and lowered it to the floor then tipped it up.

Its been my experience the slate is joined. So it has to come out intact. So its just like moving a one piece. At least thats the way I moved mine. Its joined perfect so you want to leave it that way.

However... out of a basement? Yikes... unless it had an exit at ground level you can get too. Plywood up the stairs, a blanket on the side and slide it up on on its edge... but that takes some muscle. Maybe two on bottom one or two on top. Pushing up
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Old 01-14-2015, 05:48 AM
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Slate should have wax joining the edges... Just remove it.

Number the slates position...
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Old 01-14-2015, 05:57 AM
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I've done this a few times. Moved different tables, the process was the same. This is what worked for me.

Take the rubber off the rub rail to get to the screws holding the bumpers. Remove the bumpers, then the felt, followed by the slate pieces, being careful not to pinch anybody's fingers off and or damage the slate. The rest of the job...legs, & how the table comes apart should be easy enough to figure out visually. As mentioned above - moving blankets are a must.

You could easily put is back together yourself. Worst case, if you can't get the felt right, just pay someone to do that small job.

Good Luck
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by GH02050 View Post
I've done this a few times. Moved different tables, the process was the same. This is what worked for me.

Take the rubber off the rub rail to get to the screws holding the bumpers. Remove the bumpers, then the felt, followed by the slate pieces, being careful not to pinch anybody's fingers off and or damage the slate. The rest of the job...legs, & how the table comes apart should be easy enough to figure out visually. As mentioned above - moving blankets are a must.

You could easily put is back together yourself. Worst case, if you can't get the felt right, just pay someone to do that small job.

Good Luck
Thanks for the tips. Any special tools I should bring or just the usual suspects.
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:20 AM
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I moved pool tables three times.

Have you asked for two quotes...one to dismantle and move it and then rebuild it and the other quote to rebuild it where it sits?

In my case, the savings weren't adequate not to let them just handle it all.
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:26 AM
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Originally Posted by chrispnet View Post
I moved pool tables three times.

Have you asked for two quotes...one to dismantle and move it and then rebuild it and the other quote to rebuild it where it sits?

In my case, the savings weren't adequate not to let them just handle it all.
I thought about it. But I am operating on a secret budget as is to finish the basement, so I amgoing to try and do as much myself as possible. If it was across town I would but like I said it's like 2 hours away.also I'm not really ready for the table but I need to get it out of where it is before somebody else claims it.
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:34 AM
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I have had 3 Valley bar type table moved into my basements. All three times the crews removed the legs and moved the table in one piece with the rails attached. I would call the local amusement company that owns the tables in the bars and see what they will charge you to move it.
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Rival1 View Post
I thought about it. But I am operating on a secret budget as is to finish the basement, so I amgoing to try and do as much myself as possible. If it was across town I would but like I said it's like 2 hours away.also I'm not really ready for the table but I need to get it out of where it is before somebody else claims it.
,
Simple answer to the distance issue would be to have someone professional to take it apart, put it your truck/van/trailer and you and your friend unload and store it. When ready to reassemble, get a pro. The advice above makes it sound simple, but I suspect it is easy only if you have done it or watched someone do it before. Good luck on your adventure.
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:37 AM
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In college I used to do home installations and re-felt for Gandy Tables. Should just need socket wrench extension and I think I remember 1/2" socket. Bring a small crow bar and some door frame shims to get under the wood sections for the slate (the shims will give you room and time to get your fingers ready to move the slate) Everything unbolts from underneath (the bumper rails should be numbered underneath and on the felt under each one to correlate for reassembly). You will also need a small flat blade screwdriver to undo the staples holding the bed felt down and Lineman pliers work best for staple removal (If the felt is in decent shape it can be reused but it just looks great with new!)

1. Lay underneath table and undo 3 bolts for each rail section. Package away your rails for moving.
2. Undo the bed felt. Remove ALL staples and fold felt up neatly if you are going to re-use.
3. Un-bolt 6 bolts for each piece of slate. Wedge up carefully and insert shim to ease grabbing and picking up slate for moving.
4. Unbolt legs from inside table frame.

a 7' table, the slate sections should weigh about 70 to 80 lbs each.

Good Luck.. Its not difficult but when you rush is when you ding the table frame or the slate.
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:40 AM
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secret budget as is to finish the basement
hahahah - That is exactly what I did. The wife was on a need to know basis during the build out. In the end, my brother-in-law, was happy to take the fall for the cost over runs. He's the king of the low estimate..."it will only take a weekend and $1,000" guy. You gotta have a fall guy. Room came out great & everyone is happy in the end

You can do this yourself (with help), no special tools required.
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Old 01-14-2015, 07:27 AM
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Not very hard to take a pool table apart and move. The 3 slate pieces can be moved by 2 people with ezzz. You can put it back together yourself and pay someone to come put on new felt. I would not use the old felt and if you try doing the job yourself you can order felt on line.
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Old 01-14-2015, 08:22 AM
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I have done it once, I will stick to removing "popcorn ceilings".





It's not to hard too do with two people, just takes some time. There are tons of videos on youtube. Don't forget the wax part for the seams.

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Old 01-14-2015, 09:32 AM
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I used to be a serious pool player - one pocket is my game of choice.

There ain't no way in hell you will ever get a table put back together right if you haven't done it MANY MANY times.

I guarantee you it won't roll true.

Take it down yourself. Move it into the basement yourself.

Go to the pool hall where the big money gambling takes place. If you don't know which one it is start going to the pool halls and look for the one where everyone is drinking coffee (not alcohol).

Ask who they use to do their tables.

Put new cloth on it, I like Simonis 760.

Keep the humidity low in the basement, the balls will roll a lot better (if it's humid chalk in the cloth sticks to the ball and it won't roll as far).

You can probably go to A Z BILLIARDS dot com and read more than you can comprehend regarding tables, cloth, balls etc.

PS I'm still pretty good at one pocket do any of you guys on here play one pocket? If so I'll give you 8-7 sight unseen, we can adjust if necessary after a few games

PSS don't EVER gamble on a pool game unless you know who you're playing - hustling is alive and well.
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Old 01-14-2015, 09:39 AM
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There ain't no way in hell you will ever get a table put back together right if you haven't done it MANY MANY times.
I disagree. Based on everything the OP stated do you think this is anything more than a family game room / man cave? Big stakes table ..new professional felt ... on the under the radar budget, I don't see it happening.
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Old 01-14-2015, 09:43 AM
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^^^^ you have no idea what you're talking about

A 9' table (op has a 7' table) covered in Simonis 760 the material is about $220 (op's should be less).

A local guy that does the tables for the pool hall will probably set it up for $50 - $100.

OP can assemble most of the frame let the expert handle the slates, wax, felt and rails.

OP you will NEVER get it to roll true, that I can GUARANTEE you.
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Old 01-14-2015, 10:01 AM
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^^^ sorry to piss in you cheerios but my table rolls true. I didn't hire an expert or use new felt... and guess what I haven't done it many times. I gave him the exact advise you did above minus all the bullshit about never being able to do it correctly himself. Have a nice day.

Last edited by GH02050; 01-14-2015 at 10:25 AM.
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Old 01-15-2015, 02:29 PM
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Originally Posted by rbhankins001 View Post
^^^^ you have no idea what you're talking about

A 9' table (op has a 7' table) covered in Simonis 760 the material is about $220 (op's should be less).

A local guy that does the tables for the pool hall will probably set it up for $50 - $100.

OP can assemble most of the frame let the expert handle the slates, wax, felt and rails.

OP you will NEVER get it to roll true, that I can GUARANTEE you.
Having spent 10 years+in a pool room and 5 of those running a pool room I am sure that yall have different definitions of a table rolling true. And one pocket and golf are games that demands a table roll very true because of the slow roll of the ball. BUT to set the table up the best you can and kick the can down the road and have it done professionally later when the rails go dead from kids slamming balls into them wont hurt anything. Just make sure you use a cloth with a rubber backing the Simonis 760 is gonna be too fast.

One pocket now there is a great game that I aint thought of in years. I will spot you two balls if you let me pick your pocket or give you the last two in Texas express eight.
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