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Career change, who has made a fairly major change sucessfully

Old 12-23-2014, 04:36 PM
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Default Career change, who has made a fairly major change sucessfully

Owned few small business that were automotive related, worked as shift supervisor at a plant that did wide web flexographic printing, just to high light some of what I have done. I have lots of experience that seems almost worthless when you start looking for a job. I had never finished college, in fact had dropped out only a few months into the first semester. I started going to the local community college about 2 years ago part time, I am about half way through. I have most of my electives and core requirement done. Originally I was going to take mechanical engineering but the math is proving to a challenge. So I think I am going to switch to civil technology, less math and seems to be more jobs available for someone with a 2 year degree. Anyone have any suggestions?
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Old 12-23-2014, 09:07 PM
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Old 12-24-2014, 01:58 AM
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Insurance business
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Old 12-24-2014, 02:54 AM
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Retired. Invested years figuring out what I would do with myself without a building full of employees to babysit. Dunno how I ever had time to work
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Old 12-24-2014, 03:29 AM
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Biomedical Engineering, or anything health care related.
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Old 12-24-2014, 05:44 AM
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In civil engineering the glass ceiling is not having a PE license, you'll need a Bachelors and 4 years experience to break through. A two year degree in civil technology doesn't help a whole lot unless you have strong CAD skills as well. I know folks in the second category with years of experience topping out under $50k.

It sounds like your past interests and experiences might favor the mechanical side. The math isn't fun but you need to suck it up. I took six calculus classes in college (2 years x 3 quarters) and hated all of it, but brute forced my way through it. I surely didn't ace any of them, but survived. Haven't had to do a Laplace transformation since 1982 and it not once have I needed to use calculus in my day to day job. A BSME is going to get you a lot further than a AS in CT. Hang in there!
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Old 12-24-2014, 05:50 AM
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IT field if it's your thing... You can be making 6 figures within ten years if you work hard and get a few certifications. That would also require some job hopping, but that's easy as IT is ever expanding and depending on which direction you go in and your level of experience and expertise later on, finding new opportunities is extremely easy as long as you keep an updated resume on dice.com.

I have a 2 year degree only (AA) but it is certainly not required. One of my previous bosses hadn't been to college a day in his life and was one of the smartest people I have ever known. (and was getting paid accordingly)
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Old 12-24-2014, 06:14 AM
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If you are under 40 and you want to make a change including going back to get a degree then go for it. Over 40? Not sure the payback is there. The company I work for wants young, groomable, engineers for cheap. I'll be 51 on the first of January, I babysit all these young engineers, keep them from mavericking around and making stupid mistakes. I can't imagine reinventing and trying to find a job in today's market.

My reinvent is that I plan on working for myself in 3 years building high end guitars. My advise is find something you love that you can make a living at. That way you never have to work a day in your life.
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Old 12-24-2014, 06:54 AM
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I guess you CAN imagine it...
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Old 12-24-2014, 07:11 AM
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I am 38 so spending 4-6 more years on a degree is doable but not really sure that's what I want to do. I do have income from rental properties and my wife makes six figures. So a job making 40k-50k would be fine. We have pretty low overhead, except for this addiction called offshore fishing, I work to put fuel in the boat . Yes mechanical would be a better a fit, I do have some experience drawing and designing products in cad. I really feel as said it's something that is required that one may never use. However it is required for a degree. I did take two courses in solid works and did very well, I would be content to just draw products or parts. That is why I am thinking about moving towards civil, I enjoy drawing in cad. I assume I will pickup micro station or what ever else is used. The two year civil program does not require near amount of difficult the math. There are jobs hiring for civl with 2 year degrees currently, 2 me degrees not so much. In regards to the math, I had to take math 051 before taking college level math, I got a c in that. About a month into college algebra I was just lost. The math course moves way too fast for me, I can't keep up. If I am having issues in college algebra what is calculus, statics and dynamics going to be like, was my thought.
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Old 12-24-2014, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by MayhemFT View Post
Insurance business
I have applied for a few jobs as adjuster trainee, with no success. I have years experience working on cars as both mechanic and in a body shop. I also have a some experience relating to construction and remodeling. I could absolutely do the job of adjuster and would probably enjoy it.
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Old 12-24-2014, 07:19 AM
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Mechanical for sure. Algebra is cake walk and pales in comparison to analytical statistics, organic chemistry, trig, calculus and so on and so on. My wife is a math wiz, me I do ok with 2+2 LOL.
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Old 12-24-2014, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by NiteStalker View Post
IT field if it's your thing... You can be making 6 figures within ten years if you work hard and get a few certifications. That would also require some job hopping, but that's easy as IT is ever expanding and depending on which direction you go in and your level of experience and expertise later on, finding new opportunities is extremely easy as long as you keep an updated resume on dice.com.

I have a 2 year degree only (AA) but it is certainly not required. One of my previous bosses hadn't been to college a day in his life and was one of the smartest people I have ever known. (and was getting paid accordingly)
It just doesn't really interest, me wife works with data for a large insurance company has a job title that is a mile long. She works remote which is a plus. It's just not my bag.
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Old 12-24-2014, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Reelintime View Post
It just doesn't really interest, me wife works with data for a large insurance company has a job title that is a mile long. She works remote which is a plus. It's just not my bag.
Totally understood. It is definitely not for everybody, and is something you have to get a little enjoyment out of to be successful at. Good luck figuring out your next step!
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Old 12-24-2014, 07:28 AM
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If you can finish in 4-6 years then go for it. It took me 10 working full time and class in the evenings.
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Old 12-24-2014, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Reelintime View Post
I have applied for a few jobs as adjuster trainee, with no success. I have years experience working on cars as both mechanic and in a body shop. I also have a some experience relating to construction and remodeling. I could absolutely do the job of adjuster and would probably enjoy it.
Go to the local body shops and try to get a job as an estimator...you can make decent change and you basically write estimates and manage the repair of vehicles. Once you are in that position, you should be able to make the move to the insurance side with some looking. From there, you can go a bunch of directions.

Good luck!
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Old 12-24-2014, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Reelintime View Post
Owned few small business that were automotive related, worked as shift supervisor at a plant that did wide web flexographic printing, just to high light some of what I have done. I have lots of experience that seems almost worthless when you start looking for a job. I had never finished college, in fact had dropped out only a few months into the first semester. I started going to the local community college about 2 years ago part time, I am about half way through. I have most of my electives and core requirement done. Originally I was going to take mechanical engineering but the math is proving to a challenge. So I think I am going to switch to civil technology, less math and seems to be more jobs available for someone with a 2 year degree. Anyone have any suggestions?
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Old 12-24-2014, 07:36 AM
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Was in the retail grocery business for almost 25 years, then had to leave. Looked for a sales position in the food industry at 40 years of age, told by one firm (Campbell's) I was too old. Got my real estate licence and have been selling since 1991. I wish I did this when I was in my early 20's.
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