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Is 3/4" pipe ok for this propane application?

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Is 3/4" pipe ok for this propane application?

Old 06-14-2014, 05:35 AM
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Question Is 3/4" pipe ok for this propane application?

I think it's ok... but wanted me make sure I didn't have another problem to add to the pile...

All items fed from propane source:
1) BBQ Grill (Listed on permit as 75kBTU)
2) Tankless Water Heater (Listed on permit as 199KBTU)
3) Range (150kBTU) (Listed on permit as 75kBTU)

The folks (very neat and great quality work) said that it was fine that the range was actually 150kBTU instead of 75kBTU. They said something about having "2 Pounds (PSI?) listed on the plans so it would no problem".

I really don't know what that means... I trust them and was very happy with how they worked (They just finished the rough-in part, which gets followed up by the actual appliance connections). Just want to make sure they'll be enough "whatever" to power that range.

Thanks!
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Old 06-14-2014, 05:56 AM
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Main thing you need to know is the max BTU's you can use.

http://www.amerigas.com/pdfs/Propane-Fast-Facts.pdf

John
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Old 06-14-2014, 06:12 AM
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Hi John,

If I'm reading that Table 1 correctly... 3/4" pipe can handle almost 2,000,000 BTU at 100 feet?

(I have FAR less than 100 feet of pipe...and waaaaaaaaaaaaay less than 2M BTU...)

So, that would tell me that I'm perfectly good to go?

Thanks!
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Old 06-14-2014, 06:48 AM
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overkill, but erring on the premise that if all items were turned on to full blast, there would be zero hiccups.

IF there's a countable dollar difference from 3/4 to 1/2, ask the guys what they think...and make sure the inspections dept is OK with either size.
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Old 06-14-2014, 07:42 AM
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Our old house ran clothes dryer, range, hot water heater, forced air furnace, and propane fireplace. The entire house was rigged with 1/2" pipe. No issues. Keep in mind that it would be rare to have all appliances running the same time, but should have capacity to do so.
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Old 06-14-2014, 08:24 AM
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Overkill....
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Old 06-14-2014, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by JinxCar View Post
Hi John,

If I'm reading that Table 1 correctly... 3/4" pipe can handle almost 2,000,000 BTU at 100 feet?

(I have FAR less than 100 feet of pipe...and waaaaaaaaaaaaay less than 2M BTU...)

So, that would tell me that I'm perfectly good to go?

Thanks!

at 10 psi....your appliances only run at 1/2 psi. You cannot pipe high pressure into a building.

3/4 is fine for your application, and not overkill at 1/2 psi.
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Old 06-14-2014, 01:40 PM
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Thanks guys. Looks like we should be good then.
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Old 06-14-2014, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by JinxCar View Post
Thanks guys. Looks like we should be good then.
That's how I would plumb it.
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Old 06-14-2014, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by outerbanxer View Post
at 10 psi....your appliances only run at 1/2 psi. You cannot pipe high pressure into a building.

3/4 is fine for your application, and not overkill at 1/2 psi.
Don't know what they consider high pressure in propane but in natural gas 10 psi isn't high it's medium and it can be piped into a building
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Old 06-14-2014, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by outerbanxer View Post
That's how I would plumb it.
Thanks again! It was Suburban that did the job (they actually subbed it out)... but they did an EXCELLENT job. I mean, at one point the guy dropped a tiny piece of the metal from the Trackpipe. It was tiny. The guy rooted around on the ground until he found it... I didn't care and even told him not to sweat it. He wouldn't hear of it.

They were a class act. I called the supervisor and let them know that they had a great team.

It was a pleasure to deal with them.

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Old 06-14-2014, 06:40 PM
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You said Trac pipe ? So it is the corrugated stainless steel pipe?

If that's what it is make sure it's bonded to the ground correctly.
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Old 06-15-2014, 04:30 AM
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Originally Posted by ThumperVII View Post
You said Trac pipe ? So it is the corrugated stainless steel pipe?

If that's what it is make sure it's bonded to the ground correctly.
Interesting... I've been reading about this very thing.

Here's how it set up:

200# tank on the ground. The tank is plumbed up to the attic with 3/4" Galvanized pipe.
The 3/4" Galvanized pipe has a fitting that converts from 3/4" Pipe to Track Pipe.

The Track Pipe then runs across the attic to a "T" where one leg goes down to the kitchen (the drop to the kitchen is 3/4" Galvanized) the other leg goes to more Track Pipe that then goes down to another drop of the outside grill and a water heater...

(The water heater isn't being installed yet... that's a "future use" thing (it has a "T" with a cap on the drop).

I've been reading about lightning and Track Pipe... not sure if this application needs anything else on account of of this concern?

Thanks for bringing it up.
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Old 06-15-2014, 02:51 PM
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http://www.tracpipe.com/CSST_Gas_Pip...erStrike_CSST/

This is what they used... apparently... it doesn't need to be bonded?
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Old 06-15-2014, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by JinxCar View Post
http://www.tracpipe.com/CSST_Gas_Pip...erStrike_CSST/

This is what they used... apparently... it doesn't need to be bonded?
® CounterStrike® is to be bonded in accordance with current requirements of the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70), and the National Fuel Gas Code (NFPA 54), and with any local requirements that may be in excess of the national codes. This may result in the avoidance of additional bonding costs which are required for conventional CSST.

To the best of my knowledge this "new" pipe is in response to the fires caused by lightning.

BTW CSST has a slightly different capacity then hard pipe but you should be fine.
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Old 06-15-2014, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by ThumperVII View Post
® CounterStrike® is to be bonded in accordance with current requirements of the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70), and the National Fuel Gas Code (NFPA 54), and with any local requirements that may be in excess of the national codes. This may result in the avoidance of additional bonding costs which are required for conventional CSST.

To the best of my knowledge this "new" pipe is in response to the fires caused by lightning.

BTW CSST has a slightly different capacity then hard pipe but you should be fine.
Hmmm... that's curious... (the bonding part)... I guess that's why this sort of thing gets inspected...
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Old 06-15-2014, 06:12 PM
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Originally Posted by JinxCar View Post
Hmmm... that's curious... (the bonding part)... I guess that's why this sort of thing gets inspected...
Yes codes are written to protect life and property. Not a bad thing most of the time. Some can be a pita.
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