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Any plane owners. A Local surgeon killed in his beech craft yesterday

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Any plane owners. A Local surgeon killed in his beech craft yesterday

Old 12-19-2013, 06:20 AM
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Bly
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Default Any plane owners. A Local surgeon killed in his beech craft yesterday

My wife worked with this doctor at her hospital job. He was flying in to pick his kid up for the holidays at UVA. I remember the old V tails being called doctor killers. It seems they still are even with the conventional tail. Seemed like good weather too? Light winds clear skies. Except maybe Icing from extreme cold?
This makes me reflect back to the early 70s when I walked away from getting a pilots liscence when I was at the soloing stage. Just decided I would probably kill my self if I continued.
One other plus out of my days as a student pilot. I always thought that at least if something happened to a pilot when I was flying into the bahamas small airports when fishing over there. I could maybe land us safely. So I guess it just gave me a little more confidence. One of my friends with a big boat hates flying in small planes. I am the opposite. I like light planes as long as I am not responsible.

The one thing in life I was not over confident at. Flying. Everything else did not matter. Never worried about not coming back in a boat.

Are the beech crafts just dangerous because of the 200 mph cruise? Is it true that part of the controls are interconnected with bungee cords. I know we have some pilots on THT.
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Old 12-19-2013, 06:28 AM
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The plane(s) ain't the problem.
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Old 12-19-2013, 06:31 AM
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The plane he was killed in was not a "V" tail known as the Dr.Killer! Also there are NO bungee cords connected anywhere in the controls of these planes!
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Old 12-19-2013, 06:36 AM
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The saying was: "If were not for Beechcraft, the world would be overpopulated with doctors and lawyers". Most of the time it is pilot error. With that being said, pilot error comes in many forms. Some airplanes are more forgiving than others when straying away from the "numbers". The Beech ruddervator really did not like speed excursions over Never Exceed Speed (VNE). Most airplanes have their Achilles Heel. I am sure the last few moments were very exciting............
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Old 12-19-2013, 06:40 AM
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Originally Posted by KJ6TQG View Post
I am sure the last few moments were very exciting............

Unless he was sleeping, or gasping for breath while holding his chest.......
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Old 12-19-2013, 06:41 AM
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What was his experience level?
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Old 12-19-2013, 07:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Bly View Post
Seemed like good weather too? Light winds clear skies. Except maybe Icing from extreme cold?
Icing can't happen in clear skies regardless of temp.

Saying the V-Tail is a Dr. Killer is like saying the AK is a Mall Rampage Gun.

I know nothing of your Dr., but similar experience here in Upstate. Surgeon was commuting from NJ to upstate NY (Elmira) in the Dark, stormy weather. Qualified for the conditions where he and his ride.

When the conditions worsened he made no alternative, ended up being controlled flight into terrain. Toxicology found Xanax, investigations found a prescription as well as a history of anxiety, previously unreported to OKC.

(paraphrasing here)
Factors in the crash included the pilots inability to ascertain a viable alternative possibly because he had an overwhelming calmness and a false sense of security do to the effects of the Xanax. In layman terms, he didn't give a shit. Kinda what Xanax does to you.

Obviously too hard to prove for the NTSB, but the moral of the story, and how it relates to your Wife's colleague, is that there are only a few ways that pilots continue to kill themselves, and very rarely is it the planes fault.
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Old 12-19-2013, 07:17 AM
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A hobbiest and a complex aircraft are a bad combination.
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Old 12-19-2013, 07:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Bly View Post
Is it true that part of the controls are interconnected with bungee cords. I know we have some pilots on THT.
I cant think of one aircraft that has the controls connected to bungees. There are however quite a few older aircraft and even some of the new kit aircraft that use bungees for the landing gear.
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Old 12-19-2013, 07:32 AM
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According to reports, the plane was experiencing engine troubles. From the crash site photos, it looks like he tried to put it down.

Could be any number of things, but running out of fuel would be looked at.
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Old 12-19-2013, 07:34 AM
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Beech Bonanza's were the doctor killers, the new doctor killer is the Cirrus. It is not because they are bad planes. It is because "doctors" (basically referring to a group of professionals with plenty of discretionary income to buy what they want, but not necessarily the time to properly train in it) can buy these, but not fly them enough to stay proficient. The old Beech's and new Cirrus are basically the Mercedes of light aircraft. So that is why they are known as Dr killers.
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Old 12-19-2013, 07:35 AM
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He declared an emergency, stated engine trouble. It was a straight tail, didn't burn on impact. Didn't choose or have a survivable spot to land. His fuel status not reported.
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Old 12-19-2013, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by yachtjim View Post
Beech Bonanza's were the doctor killers, the new doctor killer is the Cirrus. It is not because they are bad planes. It is because "doctors" (basically referring to a group of professionals with plenty of discretionary income to buy what they want, but not necessarily the time to properly train in it) can buy these, but not fly them enough to stay proficient. The old Beech's and new Cirrus are basically the Mercedes of light aircraft. So that is why they are known as Dr killers.
Yeah and the Cirrus even comes with a ballistic parachute. Go figure?
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Old 12-19-2013, 08:04 AM
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Another died two weeks ago in Jacksonville, killing his 20 year old daughter too.
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Old 12-19-2013, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Qb1rdman View Post
A hobbiest and a complex aircraft are a bad combination.
I don't believe this is true. It is possible to be safe and very competent with the complexities of these aircraft while maintaining another profession.

Lumping "hobbiests" together is not brilliant.
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Old 12-19-2013, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by HuntressJax View Post
Another died two weeks ago in Jacksonville, killing his 20 year old daughter too.
Yep, right here close to us. And now this.....wife's gonna have a conniption (SP?) fit. I start training to get my license next month. Why does she keep asking about my life insurance?
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Old 12-19-2013, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike Boehler View Post
I don't believe this is true. It is possible to be safe and very competent with the complexities of these aircraft while maintaining another profession.

Lumping "hobbiests" together is not brilliant.
Yeah, it was a broad brush. I'll own that.

I've just seen too many low time guys with big wallets flying planes that they ought not to be flying. Jaded.
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Old 12-19-2013, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by JMT34 View Post
Yep, right here close to us. And now this.....wife's gonna have a conniption (SP?) fit. I start training to get my license next month. Why does she keep asking about my life insurance?
Tell her that to make her happy, you have quit driving, using the boat and walking... just to be safe.
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Old 12-19-2013, 08:49 AM
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Sorry to hear about your wife's colleague. Heard about the plane and location and immediately wondered if it was a doc.

about 10 years ago had a plane crash by my house one night. Was a nasty, raining, low ceiling, low visibility night. Doctor from NJ was in Richmond for the day. Left the little Hanover airport and decided he should not be up there and try to return to the AP. He approached low behind my house and it startled me from bed.

I sat up, heard the engine go to full power and THUMP. Straight into the ground near the runway. The fire dept covered it with a tarp and came back the next morning to extract it.

Also know a guy whose brother/pilot for his Cirrus crashed in Md. Died a few days later. He was an experienced pilot I believe.

My Father's oncologist also died in a small plane crash, think it was near Charlottesville as well. He was, 51 crashed into a tree.
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Old 12-19-2013, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Qb1rdman View Post
I've just seen too many low time guys with big wallets flying planes that they ought not to be flying. Jaded.
Well, that's certainly true enough.

A good decision maker will outperform a good stick and rudder guy in my book any day of the week.

We can probably agree that it is possible for Part 91 pilots to operate safely and effectively.

Most accident chains start before the ride to the airport.
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