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Old 11-03-2013, 04:59 PM
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:04 PM
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What type of work do you do?
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:14 PM
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I am 53 and the wife is 49 and we got terminated one week apart. I feel your pain. Neither of us saw it coming.
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:19 PM
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I've been a pimp for almost 20 years and 45 years old is no problem in the market....unless you are competing with 30 year olds.

Most of my placements are very specialized and I place people in their mid/upper 50's regularly. The caveat is, those people have very unique skills that cannot be filled elsewhere.
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:24 PM
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At least you see it coming and and are trying to do something about it before it happens. You will be okay. Just keep your head up.
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Joe View Post
I'm in IT..management. I'm prepping for the very real possibility of never working full time again. Think I'm exagerrating? Read some of those stories.

You need to quit reading internet stories..... except THT.

Put yourself on the market with a couple of good IT recruiters... do not limit yourself geographically and go on a few interviews. It's not going to be that bad.
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:37 PM
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Seems like IT is an in demand field why would you not be able to find another job. Where do you live is it your area?
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:42 PM
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I know nothing about IT, management or otherwise, but I can tell you, I've had numerous kids on my payroll. Big bull type kids, who I thought would want to prove themselves to the world with pride in workmanship and stamina. Huge let downs.

I'd hire a 45 year old in a heartbeat over a 23 year old, entitlement kid.

I had a 21 year old tell me with a straight face "Man, I hope I'm in your shape at 49 because I can't keep up with you"....Seriously? That's what you get with kids these days, lots of "give up" and "can't do" people.

The young work force sucks so bad, I wonder why guys/girls in their 40's are always in panic mode about losing work. I must be totally out of touch and old school.

I guess, if its that bad, I must be wrong.
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Joe View Post
I've spoken to 5-10 IT recruiters (didn't we speak via PM once?). I've tried to stay in SC, so admittedly, I've limited myself to this area. It's dead here. When its over where I am..I'll have to widen the scope.
Joe. Why would you wait until l it's over? Make the move now while you can.
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:57 PM
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Where are you located
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Old 11-03-2013, 06:12 PM
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I understand your concern. I'm in IT as well and I went thru about a year jobless (and I'm in my 30's). Best advice I can give you is start your own consulting business. I had no choice. Start now, and in a year or so you should be semi established with your own clients.
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Old 11-03-2013, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Joe View Post
I'm in IT..management. I'm not sure if its good I see it coming or not. I've sold my boat in preparation..I'll start letting go of anything else I have that has any value early next year. When it happens, I'll sell my truck and be down to one car. I have a year or so of expenses saved..but then what? I'm prepping for the very real possibility of never working full time again. Think I'm exagerrating? Read some of those stories.

I guess now when you're 15 you need to start prepping for retirement ..for when you're 40. I feel sorry for you folks with kids.

Some interesting stuff here, too..I'd suggest anyone who works for someone else take a look. Oddly, I see a lot of the gov't workers everyone here scoffs at noted in quite a few of these anecdotes.

Science is working hard to make us live longer...almost seems fruitless. I can't think of anything worse than not being able to earn a living and running out of money to support yourself.
Dude. Get a hold of yourself. You think you may be getting sacked and you already sold the boat because of it? I think you're overreacting a bit. I'm all for being prepared and not living beyond your means, but there are IT management jobs out there. Granted, if you have no degree and are currently making $150k/year, it will be more difficult to find a lateral move, but this isn't the end of the world.

Just one month ago another IT manager is his 40's left his current job to take another with a different company - even closer to home and a little more money to boot. One thing is for sure. If you come across with that defeatist attitude it can become a self fulfilling prophecy.
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Old 11-03-2013, 06:37 PM
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Also keep in mind (and this is nothing against recruiters) that the job of a recruiter is to find people to fill job openings, which is different than finding jobs for people. Reach out to some of the vendors you currently deal with. Start looking now, as you are worth more employed than you are once you're unemployed. If you were turned down for an internal job, try and find out what you were lacking.
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Old 11-03-2013, 06:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Joe View Post
Perhaps; I'm just very concerned at what I see happening around me, and how it looks "out there".
You're right to be concerned, but don't let it get to you! Keep in mind a lot of those stories are by people not giving you the whole story. I once had a boss who was a complete jerk. He treaded on thin ice with hr, he was universally despised by all women in the company, and most men felt he was untrustworthy. Vendors didn't want to deal with him. When he was finally let go, he had difficulty in finding another job. I'm not sure he realized why he could never get a decent reference check.

I knew another person looking for a developer position, and was looking for over a year, so when I saw something that fit, I sent it their way. The response I got was "it's too far away". The job was a 16 mile commute each way. Another posting came which I forwarded, and the response was "they want me to do x,y, and z. I've been doing this for 20 years and have gotten along fine only doing x and y."

Another manager I knew had only a HS diploma. I mentioned to him that he really should go back to school, and that work would pay for it, but he was always too busy, didn't see the need, etc. Once the company was acquired, a lot of manager were let go. Many found jobs quickly, but he struggled in getting his resume past HR.

There are cases where people are doing all the right things and just not finding anything, but most of the doom and gloom people out there have some limiting factor that's affecting their job search. That's the part that doesn't get advertised.

I don't claim to have all the answers, but these are just some of the things I've noticed. If it's any consolation, I hired a 58 year old programmer! He may not know all of the latest and greatest stuff, but he's willing to learn. You can present him with something he's never seen before and his answer is "I've no idea - let me take a look at it". He has the attention span to concentrate on something that takes more than 5 minutes to solve. If I could only keep one developer, guess which one I'd keep?
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Old 11-03-2013, 07:02 PM
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Originally Posted by kiddcloud View Post
I understand your concern. I'm in IT as well and I went thru about a year jobless (and I'm in my 30's). Best advice I can give you is start your own consulting business. I had no choice. Start now, and in a year or so you should be semi established with your own clients.
This!

If you do finally get laid off, look at the lay-off as a Golden Opportunity to go out on your own. You need to stop the defeatist stuff and get aggressive!

There are a pile of companies out there that might not want to have an IT guy on their payroll but would just LOVE to have a PT IT guy set up their networks or trouble shoot what they already have. They'll pay a premium if they don't have to dig into their pockets for payroll tax or health insurance.

If you're semi-competent, word travels quick and there'll be a Magic Moment for you when one day, you wake up and find that you don't have to chase business any more---it'll chase you and you might have the luxury of turning it down because you're too busy and making more then you need.

I got laid off and divorced, all in the same year. I started doing Craigslist stuff, repairing inflatable rafts and outboards just to keep some $$ coming in (you could do this also with your IT skills) . All the while, I started a small import business for commercial fishing bait.

It took 3 years to get things off the ground. Business is nuts now. I never lost my house or my fishing cabin because I went into bunker-mentality with my spending, and after a bit of sweat and tears, managed to come out smiling. Now I have three houses and a nice boat and get to play guitar 4 or 5 hours a day. Best thing that ever happened to me (both the divorce and the lay-off)

You know that goofy saying about when someone shoves a lemon in your face you gotta make lemon aid?

It ain't such a goofy saying if you have the right attitude...

good luck
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Old 11-03-2013, 07:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Joe View Post
Have you started working again?
No, only been a month. I am an electrician and may have to work out of town. Wife has an interview Tuesday.
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