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Suggestions on putting family dog down.

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Suggestions on putting family dog down.

Old 10-08-2013, 04:52 PM
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Default Suggestions on putting family dog down.

Looks like we are at the end of our family dogs life. She is 15 years old and a big part of our family. We got her a month after being married and she has been here for the birth of all 3 of our kids. The wife adores the dog as does the kids. She hasn't eaten for days, barely drinks, has been having accidents in the house, and doesnt do much but sleep now. It is her time.

Any suggestions on handling this that has worked for your family to ease the hardship of letting a family dog go?
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Old 10-08-2013, 04:55 PM
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I had my vet come to the house ...... it really made all the difference !
I also had another dog in the house, that was very helpful.
when I put that second dog down.... Getting out and getting another puppy was good for me.
I will always have a dog !!!

Good luck, I know what your going through ....
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:03 PM
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If you plan on burying her at home, slip out and dig the grave beforehand. Have the vet come t the house.

Doesn't hurt to talk about it with the kids for a week or whatever you think is appropriate.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:07 PM
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Home or vet, I couldn't take mine to the vet, admiral did, I just cried...

Wouldn't do it with the kids around, better off come home from school and " she went to sleep "

Time does go on, and heals all wounds..my prayers
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:08 PM
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I hate to say it but the last time I had to do this it was a cat and I wussed out and lied. I took her to the vet by myself to have her "checked out" and the cat "died" while we were there. My wife knew but our daughter was about 14 at the time and I took the easy way out.

That said, we are treating our 9 year old shepherd-lab mutt for cancer and I know the time will come again. I will handle it differently.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:09 PM
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I'm really sorry to hear that, I have a dog for ptsd and I couldn't imagine it. But my old dog when I was a spry young boy, was put down. We had the vet come to the house so we could home him as he went. Made the world of a difference.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:09 PM
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You should ( if you are able) take the dog alone to the vet for this. I took my dog of 14 years and it will stay with you for a very long time. No reason to make the whole family go through this. Let everyone know what is happening and when, then let everyone say goodbye however they feel like. Get the tissues ready, this is no easy task.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:16 PM
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My old boy is a shepherd that is 10 going on 11 so he is in his late period of life and I will not look forward to that when it is his time. He still moves around pretty good and we have a 5 year old chocolate lab that helps keep him feeling young I think and gets him to exercise. When we had our rotties the oldest one got sick and looked really bad so I had to take her to the vet. She died on the table a few minutes after we got there right in front of us. That was tough,
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by iFishMD View Post
Looks like we are at the end of our family dogs life. She is 15 years old and a big part of our family. We got her a month after being married and she has been here for the birth of all 3 of our kids. The wife adores the dog as does the kids. She hasn't eaten for days, barely drinks, has been having accidents in the house, and doesnt do much but sleep now. It is her time.

Any suggestions on handling this that has worked for your family to ease the hardship of letting a family dog go?
It sucks to hear that. I've been down that road a few times and it's never easy.

15 years is pretty long for a dog and you have done well by recognizing the signs and looking out for her comfort when she's winding down.

Make sure you're with her when the time comes but leave the wife and kids at home. The dog will be fine...you won't. Compose yourself before celebrating her life with the family and looking forward to a new best friend.

Good luck, and sincere condolences.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:30 PM
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Have the vet come to your house. I had to do it recently. No way could I have let my emotions fly at a public vet office like I did at home. It was pretty peaceful, laying there with her on her bed while she passed.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:33 PM
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feelings go out to you, no thoughts for this one
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:42 PM
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have the vet come to your house and don't wait till he is suffering
no matter what it will be heartbreaking
Coming up on one year for me

RIP rusty
Best dog there ever was
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:45 PM
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Had to put down our 19 yo last month. My heart goes out to ya'll.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:58 PM
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Sucks for sure .... We put down our lab last year.... I cried like a baby ...

Another dog right away helps ... but its a terrible feeling putting down a friend
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by iFishMD View Post
Looks like we are at the end of our family dogs life. She is 15 years old and a big part of our family. We got her a month after being married and she has been here for the birth of all 3 of our kids. The wife adores the dog as does the kids. She hasn't eaten for days, barely drinks, has been having accidents in the house, and doesnt do much but sleep now. It is her time.

Any suggestions on handling this that has worked for your family to ease the hardship of letting a family dog go?
Well....we just went through this yesterday. She was 15 also and with my kids since they were young. Its not easy no matter the age. You will know when its time, you just will. Talk about this reality with the kids, I think it eases the blow. In my case my wife is the one that had to make the call, she is/was very attached and is heart broken, just so sad to see her like this. Ironically the kids took it much better, understanding its a fact of life. She served us well and protected my family all these years and she will be missed.. As soon as she started hurting that was it. I think if you explain this to the kids, try to hold off a couple days, then when you have to decide it will be a little easier as the thought is already being processed in there minds and makes things a little softer, in my opinion. Good luck to you and the family.
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Old 10-08-2013, 10:44 PM
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My wife and I have been thru this three or four times ourselves. Prepping the kids in the weeks and days prior will help them get through it. Kids tend to "forget" the pain sooner than you will. But, you and they will have to go through it anyways! Life,..... It's a bitch !! I am always stuck with the notion that we gave each of our animals the best years that they ever could have experienced. And they to us! Unless you are as old as I, start looking for a replacement. Difficult to comprehend now, but you'll eventually wish for another puppy and relish the end of each work day so you can zoom home to play with the new little fido and watch the kids learn to love yet another family pet. I think I'll go hug mine now!! Sorry.
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Old 10-09-2013, 12:34 AM
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WHY DOGS DON'T LIVE AS LONG AS PEOPLE.

by Robin Downing, DVM

Being a veterinarian, I had been called to examine a ten-year-old Irish Wolfhound named Belker. The dog's owner, his wife, and their little boy were all very attached to Belker and they were hoping for a miracle. I examined Belker and found he was dying of cancer. I told the family there were no miracles left for Belker, and offered to perform the euthanasia procedure for the old dog in their home.

As we made arrangements, the owners told me they thought it would be good for the four-year-old boy to observe the procedure. They felt he could learn something from the experience.

The next day, I felt the familiar catch in my throat as Belker's family surrounded him. The little boy seemed so calm, petting the old dog for the last time, that I wondered if he understood what was going on.

Within a few minutes, Belker slipped peacefully away. The little boy seemed to accept Belker's transition without any difficulty or confusion.

We sat together for a while after Belker's death, wondering aloud about the sad fact that animal lives are shorter than human lives.

The little boy, who had been listening quietly, piped up, "I know why."

Startled, we all turned to him. What came out of his mouth next stunned me. I'd never heard a more comforting explanation. He said, "Everybody is born so that they can learn how to live a good life - like loving everybody and being nice, right?" The four-year- old continued, "Well, animals already know how to do that, so they don't have to stay as long."

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Old 10-09-2013, 01:54 AM
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Originally Posted by semperfifishing View Post
WHY DOGS DON'T LIVE AS LONG AS PEOPLE.

by Robin Downing, DVM

Being a veterinarian, I had been called to examine a ten-year-old Irish Wolfhound named Belker. The dog's owner, his wife, and their little boy were all very attached to Belker and they were hoping for a miracle. I examined Belker and found he was dying of cancer. I told the family there were no miracles left for Belker, and offered to perform the euthanasia procedure for the old dog in their home.

As we made arrangements, the owners told me they thought it would be good for the four-year-old boy to observe the procedure. They felt he could learn something from the experience.

The next day, I felt the familiar catch in my throat as Belker's family surrounded him. The little boy seemed so calm, petting the old dog for the last time, that I wondered if he understood what was going on.

Within a few minutes, Belker slipped peacefully away. The little boy seemed to accept Belker's transition without any difficulty or confusion.

We sat together for a while after Belker's death, wondering aloud about the sad fact that animal lives are shorter than human lives.

The little boy, who had been listening quietly, piped up, "I know why."

Startled, we all turned to him. What came out of his mouth next stunned me. I'd never heard a more comforting explanation. He said, "Everybody is born so that they can learn how to live a good life - like loving everybody and being nice, right?" The four-year- old continued, "Well, animals already know how to do that, so they don't have to stay as long."

WOW
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Old 10-09-2013, 04:14 AM
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100% Vet at the house.
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Old 10-09-2013, 04:26 AM
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Just did the same last month with our lab. We took my daughter to school and explained that AJ was going to sleep. Someone above posted that you will know when it is the right thing to do and you do. Been a month or more now and my daughter still says she missed that dog almost every morning.

Good luck and sorry for the loss. Damn, kinda tearing up just writing this.
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