Notices

Computer Backup

Old 09-29-2013, 03:19 PM
  #1  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: NoneYa
Posts: 4,507
Default Computer Backup

What online service do you use for backup? And does it backup everything? Like all your programs? Had a blue screen of death at work and now wondering what would happen to my home computer.
Mr. Paul is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 03:43 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Port St. Lucie, FL
Posts: 1,176
Default

I'm too paranoid to use an online service, I have two backup drives, one USB and one internal. Every Monday a complete system image gets backed up to the internal, once a month I back up all photos, docs, etc to the USB.
Craash420 is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 05:16 PM
  #3  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Northport LI
Posts: 2,511
Default

I don't have anything mission critical except pictures. I use dropbox/google drive/ and two hard drives the piggy back everything.

Personally I recommend Acronis true image or WD backup for important files. I have found carbonite to be very slow on the last few pc's I worked on that had it.
muffinman51432 is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 05:20 PM
  #4  
Admirals ClubCaptains Club Member Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Lighthouse Point
Posts: 4,974
Default

Originally Posted by Mr. Paul View Post
What online service do you use for backup? And does it backup everything? Like all your programs? Had a blue screen of death at work and now wondering what would happen to my home computer.
I use spideroak. Not sure if the NSA has cracked it yet. Basically it backs up what you want backed up but the data is encrypted as it leaves your PC. If you lose the password you are out of luck, No one can get the data aside from you. As far as I know aside from Mega (pirate server run by dotcom) it is the only encrypted backup solution.
joe.giuliano is online now  
Old 09-29-2013, 05:34 PM
  #5  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Kent Narrows, MD
Posts: 7,087
Default

Backup data only, no need to backup programs

I am also not comfortable with online backup, and physical storage is cheap

For desktop machines, I order them with 2 HDD that are setup in a RAID 1 where one
drive mirrors the other. If 1 drive fails, you replace it and lose nothing (including programs)

I store all data on a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device. The NAS is backed up to multiple places daily including my desktop so I can get to anything quickly if necessary.
Elusive is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 05:38 PM
  #6  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: NoneYa
Posts: 4,507
Default

Why no need to back up the programs?
Mr. Paul is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 05:53 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: North Coast of America
Posts: 7,106
Default

I use Acronis True Image and back up my entire hard drive to an external hard drive once/week. Set it and forget it.
osudaddy is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 06:05 PM
  #8  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Greenville NC
Posts: 597
Default

Originally Posted by Elusive View Post
Backup data only, no need to backup programs

I am also not comfortable with online backup, and physical storage is cheap

For desktop machines, I order them with 2 HDD that are setup in a RAID 1 where one
drive mirrors the other. If 1 drive fails, you replace it and lose nothing (including programs)

I store all data on a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device. The NAS is backed up to multiple places daily including my desktop so I can get to anything quickly if necessary.
Raid 1 is the ticket, with an incremental off line backup to an external device or another machine on your home network. If data loss would cause major difficulties, I would recommend three removable device rotation with at least one in a secure location (only use this if you are fearful of online source such as carbonite etc.).
Coork is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 06:27 PM
  #9  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3
Default

Elusive is doing one of the coolest backup tricks with the RAID setup. I'm not that sophisticated, but I feel pretty secure:
~Once a week or so, I create a full system image on an external 2TB USB drive in case of HD failure or viral issues.
~I don't let anyone touch my computer--no one DLs anything but me. (That way I never have to get mad at anyone else if things go horribly wrong...)
~I'm only home network connected to my own laptop.
~MS Security Essentials and AVG pro both running.
~My working files, in use all the time and critical, I save to Skydrive, and ALSO to Google Drive.
~Both of the free online services sync to my laptop as well.

Hope that adds to the knowledge bank.
AustinWriter is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 06:58 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Pacific NW coast~!
Posts: 2,287
Default

One good electrical surge, or your computer decides to go up in flames ... and you loose everything.

There is so much data in cloud storage / online backup ... who is going to care about your stuff?

Stick with a big company like Microsoft (Skydrive), Apple (iCloud), Google (Google Drive), Dropbox that has a lot ot loose if they mishandle your privacy.
makonnen is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 07:20 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Pacific NW coast~!
Posts: 2,287
Default

Originally Posted by Elusive View Post
Backup data only, no need to backup programs

I am also not comfortable with online backup, and physical storage is cheap

For desktop machines, I order them with 2 HDD that are setup in a RAID 1 where one
drive mirrors the other. If 1 drive fails, you replace it and lose nothing (including programs)

I store all data on a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device. The NAS is backed up to multiple places daily including my desktop so I can get to anything quickly if necessary.
The problem I have with RAID setups is ... well, at least with our RAID (3ware controller) ...

We're using a simple RAID 1 on most of our servers. Then we back up to another server at a different physical locations every night. But even with our RAID 1 ("mirroring" two hard disks), the data on the hard disk is encrpyted. Anyone who plugs in the hard disk won't see anything but a bunch of junk. I mean this server is now 5 years old. But from what I understand from the documentation way back then ... is that the encryption is tied to the RAID controller itself.

Of course the whole point of encryption is to make it very difficult to break. So if you lost that RAID controller, lets say it burns up or gets physically damaged...how do you recover the data on your encrypted hard disks? YOu can't plug in a different RAID controller, the encryption keys are different.

Maybe I'm wrong and read the documentation incorrectly. Maybe things have changed in the last 5 years since I bought a RAID controller.

RAID is too complicated for home use IMO. Besides, how much is it going to help if the computer gets stolen?
makonnen is offline  
Old 09-29-2013, 09:15 PM
  #12  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Kent Narrows, MD
Posts: 7,087
Default

If you have a HDD failure and you don't have a mirrored drive, then you will have to replace the drive, reload the OS and all programs. Therefore backing up programs is useless

RAID 1 on the workstation eliminates the need to backup except in the case of theft,fire,etc. A NAS with RAID 10 is the next incremental step for storage and backup and can be used on a small network. It also eliminates a single point of failure. The next step is to have the NAS back up to a 2nd NAS offsite which eliminates loss of data due to theft, fire, flood, etc. Nothing has to be encrypted unless it is needed or required

Most NAS devices come with automated backup software that allow scheduled backups which eliminates forgetting to back up

None of this is expensive or terribly difficult to setup
Elusive is offline  
Old 09-30-2013, 03:48 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Lake Murray, SC
Posts: 4,234
Default

Originally Posted by Elusive View Post
If you have a HDD failure and you don't have a mirrored drive, then you will have to replace the drive, reload the OS and all programs. Therefore backing up programs is useless
Not accurate. Creating an image is backing up the programs and the entire hard drive. It creates an exact copy of the hard drive. The whole point of creating a system image is to avoid having to reload the OS and all the programs stored on that drive. Reloading the image restores that hard drive image to the new one and all the programs and settings saving a lot of time over a fresh install. Here are some instructions on how to load an image.
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/7702/...-image-backup/
jrolin1 is offline  
Old 09-30-2013, 04:12 AM
  #14  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Kent Narrows, MD
Posts: 7,087
Default

Originally Posted by jrolin1 View Post
Not accurate. Creating an image is backing up the programs and the entire hard drive. It creates an exact copy of the hard drive. The whole point of creating a system image is to avoid having to reload the OS and all the programs stored on that drive. Reloading the image restores that hard drive image to the new one and all the programs and settings saving a lot of time over a fresh install. Here are some instructions on how to load an image.
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/7702/...-image-backup/

I am definitely no expert, but I have never had a restored image with OS, drivers, programs, work perfectly. I have found it to be less time consuming to do a fresh install of the OS & programs than to troubleshoot why the image did not fully work. There is also the "benefit" of a fresh install which is to get rid of accumulated and unneeded programs.

The point is, for the cost of a 2nd drive (cheap) you can do a RAID 1 (mirror) and eliminate the need to backup or store a regular image to prevent loss due to a HDD failure. YMMV
Elusive is offline  
Old 09-30-2013, 08:12 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Lake Murray, SC
Posts: 4,234
Default

Images work fine. That is how most computers are loaded initially. The image is not a replacement for a backup of your data though. Raid 0 is not either. Doing raid 0 to prevent loss from a crashed hard drive is fine. But it should not replace your backup of data. If someone (or malware on purpose) accidentally deletes or corrupts something you cannot go to the backup to restore it since it is mirrored and both copies are bad. Having a non-attached backup (like a USB hard drive or a nas like you use) and storing it offsite is safer. In my case I make an image of my OS partition and a backup of my data partition to the portable hard drive every month or whenever I load personal data (mostly pictures) that I care about.
jrolin1 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread